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INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER IN 1841 


Calendar 

OF 

The Faculty of Applied 
Science 


FORTY-SEVENTH SESSION 


1939-1940 


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Calendar 

OF 

The Faculty of Applied 
Science 


FORTY-SEVENTH SESSION 
1939-1940 

PRINTED FOR THE UNtVERSITY BY 
HANSON & EDGAR 
KINGSTON 
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CALENDAR 


















1939 











JANUARY 



FEBRUARY 




MARCH 





APRIL 



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1940 


JANUARY 



FEBRUARY 




MARCH 





APRIL 



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MAY 





JUNE 





JULY 





AUGUST 



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SEPTEMBER 



OCTOBER 



NOVEMBER 



DECEMBER 


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TABLE OF CONTENTS 


PAGE 

Academic Year 5 

Admission to the Faculty of Applied Science 

By Matriculation 

By Equivalent examination 24 

To Advanced standing 

Special Students 25 

Administration and Government 15 

Board of Trustees 15 

University Council 15 

University Senate 16 

Faculty Boards 17 

Athletics 22 & 118 

Calendar 2 

Courses of Study Leading to Degrees 44 

To B.Sc 44 

To B.A. and B.Sc. (6 years) 59 

To M.Sc 42&83 

Degrees, B.Sc. and M.Sc 41 & 42 

Degrees Awarded 122 

Equipment and Special Facilities 20 

Engineering Society 22 

Examinations 34 

Sessional 34 

Mid-term 35 

Mid-session 35 

Supplemental 35 

Field Work 22 

Fees 39 

Fellowships 25 

General Information 37 

Fraternities 38 

Expenses 37 

Student Self-Government 37 

Canadian Officers’ Training Corps 38 

Employment Service 33 

Physical Welfare of Students 37 

Vaccination 37 

Graduate Course in Commerce 58 

Graduate Course in Geology 59 

Historical Note 18 

Library 20 

Medals — Governor General’s and Departmental 25 

Officers of Administration 6 

Trustees 6 

Council 8 

Senate 9 


174159 


PAGE 

Officers of Instruction Iq 

Plan of University Grounds I 35 

Regulations 34 

Scholarships and Prizes 25 

Scholarships Awarded Session 1937-38 119 

Subjects of Study 61 

Biology 62 

Qiemistry 71 

Chemical Engineering 94 

Civil Engineering 98 

Descriptive Geometry 117 

Drawing 116 

Economics 62 

Electrical Engineering 106 

Engineering Economics 103 

English 61 

Field Work 106 

Fire Assaying 94 

French 62 

General Engineering 98 

Geology 79 

German 61 

Highway Engineering 104 

Hydraulic Engineering 101 

Mathematics 63 

Mechanical Engineering 109 

Metallography 93 

Metallurgy 91 

Milling 90 

Mineralogy 84 

Mining Engineering 88 

Municipal Engineering 103 

Ore dressing 90 

Physical Training 118 

Physics 66 

Projection 117 

Railway Engineering 102 

Shop Work 115 

Structural Engineering 100 

Surveying 104 

Thermodynamics 113 

Time Table of Classes 126 


5 


ACADEMIC YEAR 

1939 

May 1 Written notice due at the Registrar’s Office of candidates’ inten- 
tion to compete for Provincial Scholarships and Ontario 
Matriculation Scholarships. 

July 15 Last day for applying for September examinations, or for degrees. 

Students applying after this date will be required to pay a 
late fee of $3. 

Aug. 24 Shop Work for Courses F. and G. begins. 

Aug. 29 Arts Supplemental Examinations begin. 

Sept. 1 Last day for receiving applications for the Robert Bruce Bursaries. 

Sept. 7, S, 9 Supplemental Examinations in Applied Science. 

Sept. 11 Surveying Field Class opens. 

*Sept. 26 Registration of First Year Students. Late fee after this date. 

($3 on Wednesday and $1 more for each day after that date). 

Sept. 27 Classes of First Year open at 8 a.m. 

Sept. 27 Registration of Second, Third and Fourth Years. Late fee after 
this date, ($3 on Thursday and $1 more for each day after 
that date.) 

Sept. 28 Classes of Second, Third and Fourth Years open at 8 a.m. 

Oct. 7 Last day of registration (with extra fee) of students in Applied 
Science who have not previously obtained from the Faculty 
permission to register later. 

Dates of the Christmas examinations for 1st and 2nd years to be announced. 

Dec. 21 Christmas holidays begin at 5 p.m. 

1940 

Jan. 3 Final examinations in half courses begin. 

Jan. 8 Classes re-open (2nd term) at 8 a.m. 

Feb. 16-17 Mid-term holiday. 

i\Tar. 15 Last day for receiving applications for graduation. 

Mar. 22 Good Friday. 

Apr. 1 Last day for receiving manuscripts and essays for prizes. 

Apr. 6 Classes close at 12 o’clock noon. 

Apr. 10 Examinations begin. 

May 17 Convocation for distributing prizes, announcing honours and con- 
ferring degrees. (This date is provisional). 

A student entering the Faculty of Applied Science for the first time 

must submit a certificate showing successful vaccination. 


6 


OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 


CHANCELLOR 

James A. Richardson, B.A., LL.D. 

PRINCIPAL AND VICE-CHANCELLOR 
Robert C. Wallace, M.A, D.Sc, Ph.D, LL.D., F.G.S., F.R.S.C. 

RECTOR 

The Honourable Norman McLeod Rogers, M.A., B.Litt., B.C.L, 
VICE-PRINCIPAL AND TREASURER 

W. E. McNeill, M.A., Ph.D., D.C.L., LL.D., F.R.S.C. 

REGISTRAR 

Jean I. Royce, B.A. 


THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 


CHAIRMAN 

J. M. Macdonnell, M.C., M.A. 
SECRETARY 

W. E. McNeill, M.A., Ph.D., D.C.L., LL.D., F.R.S.C. 


EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS 

James A. Richardson, B.A., LL.D Chancellor 

Robert C. Wallace, M.A., D.Sc., Ph.D., LL.D., F.G.S., F.R.S.C. . . Principal 
The Honourable Norman McLeod Rogers, M.A., B.Litt., B.C.L. ... Rcclot 


7 


Retire 1939 

Rev. G. a. Brov^^n, M.A., B.D., D.D.^ 

R. Crawford, B.A.^ 

Elmer Davis, Esq.® 

A. J. Meiklejohn, B.A.® 

Mrs. George Ross, B.A.® 

Retire 1940 

Jackson Booth, Esq.^ 

W. C. Clark, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D.® 

Senator A. C. Hardy, B.A., LL.B., P.C., K.C.® 

Dennis Jordan, B.A., M.D., C.M.® 

Alexander Longwell, B.A., B.Sc.i 

J. C. Macfarlane, M.A., K.C.^ 

A. E. MacRae, B.Sc.7 

Rev. Leslie Pidgeon, B.A., D.D.® 

Fraser D. Reid, B.Sc.^ 

Charlotte E. Whitton, C.B.E., M.A.s 

Retire 1941 

G. C. Bateman, B.Sc.^ 

J. M. Campbell, Esq.'^ 

J. G. Dwyer, M.D., LL.D.® 

T. H. Farrell, M.D.^ 

V. K. Grefj^, M.A.® 

John Irwin, Esq.^ 

T. A. McGinnis, B.Sc.2 

D. I. McLeod, B.A.® 

O. D. Skelton, M.A., Ph.D., F.R.S.C., LL.D.-^ 
R. M. Smith, B.Sc.® 

Retire 1942 

D. D. Calvin, B.A.® 

E. A. Collins, B.Sc.® 

J. M. Farrell, B.A., K.C.® 

R. D. Harkness, B.Sc.'^ 

Senator H. H. Horsey, B.A.^ 

D. H. Laird, M.A., K.C.i 

J. M. Macdonnell, 'M.A.^ 

Sir Edward Peacock, M.A., D.C.L., G.C.V.O.® 

B. M. Stewart, M.A., Ph.D.® 


Kingston, Out. 
Kingston, Ont. 
Kingston, Ont. 
Kingston, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 


.... Ottawa, Ont. 
.... Ottawa, Ont. 
. . Brockville, Ont. 
. . . . Toronto', Ont. 
. . . . Toronto', Ont. 
. . . Toronto, Ont. 
.... Ottawa, Ont. 
. . . Alontreal, P.Q. 
. . . Toronto, Ont. 
.... Ottawa, Ont. 


, . . . Toronto, Ont. 
. . . Kingston, Ont. 
. New York, N.Y. 

Utica, N.Y. 

. . . . Toronto, Ont. 
. . . Alontreal, P.Q. 
. . . Kingston, Ont. 
. . . . Toronto, Ont. 
.... Ottawa, Ont. 
. . . . Toronto', Ont. 

. . . . Toronto, Ont. 
Copper Cliff, Ont. 
. . . Kingston, Ont. 
. . Alontreal, P.Q. 
.... Ottawa, Ont. 

, . Winnipeg, A4an. 
. . . . Toronto, Ont. 

. . . . London, Eng. 
New York, N.Y. 


Retire 1943 

D. K. AIacTavish, B.A., K.C . 2 Ottawa, Ont. 

lEIectecl by the University Council for three years. 

2EIected by the Benefactors' for four years. 

3Elected by the Graduates for three years. 

4EIected by the Board of Trustees to represent the Faculty of Applied Science for three 
years. 

^Elected by the Faculty of Queen’s Theological College for one year. 

^Elected by the Board of Trustees for four years. 

tElected By Benefactors to represent the Faculty of Applied .Science for three years. 


8 

THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

Secretary 

Gordon J. Smith, B.A., B.Sc. 

Ex-of¥icio Members 

The Chancellor 
The Principal 

The Members of the Board of Trustees 
The Members of the Senate 

Elective Members 
Retire 1940 

J. A. Bannister, B.A., D.Paed Peterborough, Ont, 

C. W. Greenland, B.Sc Toronto, Ont. 

Campbell Laidlaw, B.A., M.D., C.M Ottawa, Ont. 

E. L. Longmore, B.Sc Timmins, Ont. 

B. E. Norrish, M.Sc Montreal, Que. 

G. S. Otto, M.A Hamilton, Ont. 

L. A. Pierce, B.A., S.T.D., LL.D., D.Litt Toronto, Ont. 

Mrs. R. O. Sweezey, B.A Kingston, Ont. 

James Wallace, M.A., B.D., M.D., C.M New York, N.Y. 

Retire 1941 

J. C. Elliott, M.A Toronto, Ont. 

J. F. Houston, M.D., C.M Hamilton, Ont. 

N. M. Leckie, B.A., B.D., D.D Grimsby, Ont. 

A. A. MacKay, B.Sc Montreal, Que. 

A. G. MacLachlan, B.Sc Ottawa, Ont. 

G. G. McNab, M.A., D.Paed Guelph, Ont. 

G. C. Monture, B.Sc Ottawa, Ont. 

D. W. Stewart, B.A Renfrew, Ont. 

N. B. WoRMiTH, M.A Toronto, Ont. 

Retire 1942 

C. H. Bland, B.A Ottawa, Ont 

C. A. Cameron, B.A Belleville, Ont 

Mrs. D. M. Chown, B.A Kingston, Ont 

A. D. Cornett, M.A., B.D Smith’s Falls, Ont 

D. G. Geiger, B.Sc Toronto, Ont 

^Alexander Longwell, B.A., B.Sc Toronto, Ont. 

R. K. Paterson, M.D., CM Ottawa, Ont 

G. J. Smith, B.A., B.Sc Kingston, Ont 

Judge M. B. Tudhope, B.A Brockville, Ont 

Retire 1943 

*G. C. Bateman, B.Sc Toronto, Ont. 

W. G. Cornett, B.A., M.D., C.M Hamilton, Ont. 

W. C. Dowsley, M.A Brockville, Ont 

W. S. Kirkland, M.A., LL.D Toronto, Ont. 

Mrs. H. a. Lavell, B.A Kingston, *Ont 

J. Y. MacKinnon, M.A., B.D., Ph.D London, Out 

N. B. MacRostie, B.A., B.Sc Ottawa, Ont. 

Mrs. Etta Newlands, M.A Kingston, Ont. 

J. M. Young, B.A., M.D., C.M Windsor, Ont. 


9 


Retire 1944 

E. T. CoRKiLL, B.Sc Toronto, Ont. 

C. W. Drury, B.Sc., Ph.D Toronto, Ont. 

A, G. Farrell, B.A Toronto, Ont. 

D. D. Findlay, B.Sc Carleton Place, Ont. 

*J. C. Macfarlane, M.A., K.C Toronto, Ont. 

B. R. MacKay, B.Sc., Ph.D Ottawa, Ont. 

W. A. Newman, B.Sc Montreal, Que. 

E. T. Sterne, B.Sc Brantford, Ont. 

E. J. F. Williams, B.A., M.D., C.M Brockville, Ont. 

Retires 1945 

R. W. Anglin, M.A Toronto, Ont. 

J. E. S. Dunlop, B.A Winnipeg, Man. 

J. A. Edmison, B.A Montreal, P.Q. 

^T. H. Farrell, M.A., M.D., C.M Utica, N.Y. 

*H. H. Horsey, B.A Ottawa, Ont. 

D. E. Keeley, B.Sc Schumacher, Ont. 

Francis King, M.A., K.C Kingston, Ont. 

*D. H. Laird, M.A., K.C Winnipeg, Man. 

Mrs. G. S. Silverthorne, B.A., M.D., C.M Toronto, Ont. 


•Representative of the Council on the Board of Trustees. 

THE SENATE 
Ex-O'fficio Members 

Robert C. Wallace, M.A., D.Sc., Ph.D., LL.D., F.G.S., F.R.S.C, .. Principal 

W. E. McNeill, M.A., Ph.D., D.C.L., LL.D., F.R.S.C Vice-Principal 

John Matheson, M.A Dean of the Faculty of Arts 

A. L. Clark, B.Sc., Ph.D., F.R.S.C.. . Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science 
Frederick Etherington, M.D., F.R.C.S.(C.), C.M.G., 

Dean of the Faculty of Medicine 
Rev. H. a. Kent, M.A., D.D., F.R.S. A.. . Principal Queen’s Theological College 


Elective Members 
The Faculty of Arts 

R. G. Trotter, M.A., Ph.D., F.R. Hist. S. Retires 1940 

W. M. Conacher, B.A., D.esL Retires 1941 

Norman Miller, M.A., Ph.D Retires 1942 

The Faculty of Applied Science 

E. L. Bruce, B.Sc., M.A., Ph.D., F.R.S.C, F.G.S.A Retires 1940 

M. B. Baker, B.A., B.Sc., F.G.S.A., F.R.S.C Retires 1941 

W. P. WiLGAR, D.S.O., B.Sc Retires 1942 

The Facultv of Medicine 

' G. B. Reed, B.Sc., Ph.D., F.R.S.C Retires 1940 

D. C. Matheson, M.B Retires 1940 

W. A. Jones, M.D., F.R.C.P., F.F.R Retires 1940 

Queen’s Theological College 

Rev. j. R. Watts, B.A., D.D Retires 1940 

Rev. j. M. Shaw, M.A., D.D Retires 1940 


10 


OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

I.— EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

S. F. Kirkpatrick, M.Sc., 

Emeritus Professor of Metallurgy, Ottawa 

W. L. Goodwin, B.Sc., D.Sc., F.R.S.C., 

Emeritus Professor of Chemistry, Montreal 

II.— IN THE FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE 

A. L. Clark, B.Sc., Ph.D., F.R.S.C., 

Professor of Physics and Dean of the Faculty, 200 Albert Street 

A. Macphail, C.M.G., D.S.O., B.Sc., LL.D., 

Professor of General Engineering, 50 Clergy Street East 

M. B. Baker, B.A., B.Sc., F.G.S.A., F.R.S.C., 

Professor of Geology, 120 University Avenue 

J. Matheson, M.A., 

Professor of Mathematics, and Dean of the Faculty of Arts, 

51 Queen’s Crescent. 

W. P. WiLGAR, D.S.O., B.Sc. 

Professor of Civil Engineering, 56 Earl Street. 

L. F. Goodwin, A.C.G.I., Ph.D., F.I.C. 

Professor of Industrial Chemistry aiid Chemical Engineering, 

311 King Street West. 

A. C. Neish, A.M., Ph.D., F.C.I.C. 

Professor of Chemistry, 181 King Street W. 

E. L. Bruce. B.Sc., M.A., Ph.D., F.R.S.C., F.G.S.A. 

Miller Memorial Research Professor in Geology, 140 Beverly Street. 

L. M. Arkley, M.Sc., 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 22 Kensington Avenue. 

S. N. Graham, B.Sc. 

Professor of Mining Engineering, 11 Kensington Avenue. 

D. M. Jemaiett, B.Sc., M.A. 

Professor of Electrical Engineering, “Elmhurst”, Centre Street. 


T. A. Gray, O.B.E., D.Sc., F.R.S.C., F.R.S. 
The Chown Research Professor of Physics, 


26 Wellington Street. 


11 


J. E. Hawley, M.A, Ph.D.. F.G.S.A, 
Professor of Mineralogy, 

T. V. Lord, B.Sc. 

Professor of Metallurgy, 

C. F, Gummer, M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Mathematics, 

J. K. Robertson, M.A., F.R.S.C. 

The Robert Waddell Professor of 

J. A. McRae, M.A., Ph.D., F.I.C. 
Professor of Chemistry, 

N. Miller, M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Mathematics, 

E. Flammer, B.Sc., Ph.D. 

Professor of Physics, 

D. S. Ellis, D.S.O., B.Sc., M.A., M.C.E 
Professor of Ciznl Engineering, 

A. Jackson, B.Sc., 

Professor of Dra^ighting, 

Secretary of the Facidty of Applied 


'.R.S.C. 

123 Queen’s Crescent. 

428 Earl Street. 

149 Collingwood Street. 

Experimental Physics, 

105 Albert Street 

226 Erontenac Street. 

28 Kensington Avenue. 
68 Collingwood Street, 

418 Earl Street. 
317 King Street W. 

Science, 


B. Rose, B.Sc., Ph.D., F.R.S.C, F.G.S.A. 

Professor of Geology, 208 Albert Street. 

C. E. Walker, B.Sc.(Acc.), C.A., 

Professor of Commerce, 84 College Street 

L. T. Rutledge, B.A.Sc., * 

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering , 604 Earl Street. 

K. P. Johnston, B.A., B.Sc., 

Associate Professor of Mathematics, Annandale Apts,, Sydenham Street 
G. B. Frost, B.A., Ph.D., 

Associate Professor of Chemistry, Annandale Apts., Sydenham Street 
John Stanley, M.A., Ph.D., 

Associate Professor of Biology, 23 West Street. 

L. A. Munro, M.A., Ph.D., F.C.I.C., 

Associate Professor of Chemistry, 


104 Collingwood Street. 


12 


R. L. Dorrance, M.A., F.C.I.C, 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry, 

O. A. Carson, B.Sc., A.M., Ph.D., 

Assistant Professor of Metallurgy, 

G. L. Edgett, M.A., Ph.D., 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, 

B. W. Sargent, M.A., Ph.D., 

Assistant Professor of Physics, 

E. E. Watson, M.Sc., Ph.D., 

Assistant Professor of Physics. 

H. M. Cave, M.A., Ph.D., 

Assistant Professor of Physics, 

H. H. Stewart, B.Sc., M.S., 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, 

R. A. Low, B.Sc., M.C.E., 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering , 

]. B. Baty, B.Sc., 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, 

H. W. Darkness, M.Sc., M.A., Ph.D., 

Assistant Professor of Physics, 

J. O. Watts, M.A., 

Lecturer in Mathematics, 

S. M. Gil HOUR, Ph.D., 

Lecturer in German, 

H. J. Styles, B.Sc., 

Lecturer in Draughting, 

C. J. Vincent, A.M., Ph.D., 

Lecturer in English, 

William Angus, A.M., Ph.D., 

Lecturer in English, 

N. W. Buerger, S.M., 

Lee hirer in Geology and Mineralogy, 


81 Lower Union Street 

72 Barrie Street. 

41 Traymoor Avenue. 

85 Nelson Street. 

574 Union Street. 

85 Nelson Street. 

435 Frontenac Street. 

86 Sydenham Street. 

137 Union Street West. 

181 University Avenue. 

Y.M.C.A. 

21 Beverly Street. 
97 Wellington Street. 

207 William Street. 

22 Collingwood Street. 

130 Beverly Street. 


13 


H. G. Conn, B.Sc, 


Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering, 
H. S. Pollock, M.Sc., 


376 Earl Street. 


Lecturer in Electrical Engineering, 
J. D, Stewart, M.A., 


471 Earl Street. 


Lecturer in Mathematics, 
M. W. Huggins, M.A.Sc., 


404 Albert Street. 


Lecturer in Civil Engineering, 
G. A. Revell, M.Sc., 


109 Wellington Street. 


Lecturer in Chemical Engineering , 

E. G. Taylor, B.Sc., Sc.M., Ph.D., (Wales) A.I.C., 


36 Wellington Street. 


Lecturer in Chemistry, 


152 University Avenue. 


Instructor in Chemistry : J. A. Martin, M.A. 

Instructor in Physical Training: J. G. Bews. 

Instructor in Shop Work: A. C. Baiden. 

Instructor in Blacksmithing : W. E. Connolly. 

Assistant Instructor in Physical Training : J. F. Edwards, B.A. 


ASSISTANTS AND DEMONSTRATORS 


Physics : J. E. Kennedy, B.A., C. M. Cross, B.A. 

Chemistry: A. J. Abbott, B.Sc., H. K. Coulthart, B.A., A. K. Edwards, B.Sc., 
J. E. Hanna, B.A., J. A. Pearce, B.A. 

Mining and Metallurgy: J. T. Corkill, B.Sc., W. M. Robinson, B.Sc. 
Draughting: A. O. Monk, B.Sc. 

Electrical Engineering : D. M. Bews, B.Sc., R. A. Doherty, B.Sc. 
Mechanieal Engineering: H. A. Davis, B.Sc. 

Geology : W. C. Giissow, M.Sc., Ph.D., W. T. Love, B.Sc., H. F. Morrow, B.Sc. 
Mineralogy: W. J. McGill, B.Sc. 

Ck’il Engineering: A. Dolan, B.Sc., C. O. P. Klotz, B.Sc. 

UNDERGRADUATE ASSISTANTS AND DOUGLAS TUTORS 

N. Z. Alcock, L. S. Brooks, W. W. Donaldson, L. G. Henry, J. A. Jarvis, 
R. W. Kraft, J. A. McLaren, W. M. Newby, E. W. Niergarth, 
G. M. Robson, R. G. Rowan, C. N. Si.mpson, N. J. Southern, 
J. A. Waghorne, W. a. Youn(;. 


14 


OTHER OFFICERS 


LIBRARIAN 
E. C. Kyte 

CURATORS OF THE LIBRARY 

1'RiNcii‘AL Wallace, Principal Kent, Vice-Principal McNeill, Dean Ci-ark, 
Dean Matheson, Dean Etherington, Professors M. B. Baker, 
James Miller, Knox, Roy and Shaw. 

CURATORS OF THE MUSEUM 

The Professors of Biology and Geology 

DIRECTOR OF ENDOWMENT 
Gordon J. Smith, B.A., B.Sc. 

DIRECTOR, DEPARTMENT OF UNIVERSITY EXTENSION 
R. M. Winter, M.A. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF BUILDINGS 

James Bews 

SECRETARY-TREASURER ATHLETIC BOARD OF CONTROL 
Charles Hicks 

ACTING SECRETARY-TREASURER GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 
MANAGER OF EMPLOYMENT BUREAU 

H. J. Hamilton, B.A. 

MEDICAL OFFICER 
J. T. T WEDDELL, M.D,, CM, 


15 


ADMINISTRATION AND GOVERNMENT 

The administration of the University is vested in the Board of 
Trustees, the University Council, the Senate, and the Faculty Boards. 


THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

The Board of Trustees consists of ex-officio and elective members. 
The former are the Chancellor, the Principal and the Rector. The latter 
consist of (1) one representative from each affiliated college, (2) repre- 
sentatives as provided for by the Statutes from (a) the University Council, 
(6) the Benefactors, {c) the Graduates, and (3) members elected by the 
Board of Trustees. 

The functions of the Board of Trustees are to manage the finances, 
to possess and care for the property, to procure legislation, to appoint 
instructors and other officers, and in general to attend to sueh external 
matters as do not relate directly to instruction. 


THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

The University Council consists of the Chancellor, the Trustees, the 
members of the Senate, and an equal number of members elected by the 
graduates from their own members. 

The Functions of the Council are : 

(1) To elect the Chancellor, except when two or more candidates are 
nominated, in which case the election is by registered graduates. 

(2) To elect six trustees, two of whom shall retire annually. 

(3) To make by-laws governing the elections of (a) the Rector by the 
registered students, {h) seven trustees by the benefactors, (c) six trustees 
by the University Council, and (d) six trustees by the graduates. 

(4) To discuss all questions relating to the University and its welfare. 

(5) To make representation of its views to the Senate or the Board 
of Trustees. 

(6) To decide on proposals for affiliation. 


16 


(7) To arrange all matters pertaining to (a) its own meetings and busi- 
ness, (b) the meetings and proceedings of Convocation, (c) the installation 
of the Chancellor, and (d) the fees for membership, registration, and voting. 

Ordinarily the annual meeting of the Council is held on the day before 
the spring Convocation. 


THE SENATE 

The Senate consists of : 

The Principal. 

The Vice-Principal. 

The Principal of Queen’s Theological College. 

The Dean of the Faculty of Arts. 

The Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science 

The Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. 

Three Professors elected by the Faculty of Arts. 

Three Professors elected by the Faculty of Medicine. 

Three Professors elected by the Faculty of Applied Science. 

Two Professors elected by the Faculty of Queen’s Theological College. 

The Registrar. 

The Functions of the Senate are : 

(1) To determine all matters of an academic character which concern 
the University as a whole. 

(2) To consider and determine all courses of study leading to a degree, 
including conditions of Matriculation, on recommendation of the respective 
Faculty Boards ; but the Senate shall not embody any changes without having 
previously presented these to the Faculty. 

(3) To recommend to the Board of Trustees the establishment of any 
additional Faculty, Department, Chair, or Course of Instruction in the 
University. 

(4) To be the medium of communication between the Alma Mater 
Society and the Governing Boards. 

(5) To determine all regulations regarding the social functions of the 
students within the University, and regarding the University Library and 
University Reading Rooms. 

(6) To publish the University Calendars. 

(7) To conduct examinations. 


17 


(8) To grant Degrees. 

(9) To award University Scholarships, Medals and Prizes. 

(10) To enforce the Statutes, Rules and Ordinances of the University. 

(11) And generally, to make such recommendations to the Governing 
Boards as may be deemed expedient for promoting the interests of the 
University. 


THE FACULTY BOARDS 

The Faculty Boards are constituted as follows : 

For the Faculty of Arts and for the Faculty of Applied Science, the 
Dean, Professors, Associate Professors, Assistant Professors, and Lecturers 
of each Faculty have power to meet as separate boards, and to administer 
the affairs of each Faculty under such regulations as the Board of Trustees 
may prescribe. 

For the Faculty of Medicine, the Dean, Professors, Associate Professors, 
and Assistant Professors have power to meet as a separate board, and to 
administer the affairs of the Faculty under such regulations as the Board of 
Trustees may prescribe. 

The Principal and Vice-Principal are ex-officio members of each of the 
Faculty Boards. 

' The Functions of the Faculty Boards are: 

(1) To recommend to the Senate courses of study leading to a degree, 
and the conditions of admission. 

(2) To decide upon applications for admission or for change of course, 
subject to the regulations of the Senate. 

(3) To submit to the Senate names for both ordinary and honorary 
degrees. 

(4) To arrange the time-table for classes and to edit the Faculty 
Calendar, subject to the approval of the Senate. 

(5) To control registration, and to determine the amount of fees and 
manner of payment, subject to the regulations of the Senate and the approval 
of the Board of Trustees. 

(6) To deal with class failures. 

(7) To exercise academic supervision over students. 


18 


(8) To make such recommendations to the Senate as may be deemed 
expedient for promoting the efficiency of the University. 

(9) To award Faculty Scholarships, Medals and Prizes. 

(10) To appoint, within the limits of the funds made available by the 
Trustees, such sessional assistants, fellows, tutors and demonstrators as 
shall be needed to give instruction in the subjects taught by the Faculty. 

(11) To pass such regulations and by-laws as may be necessary for the 
exercise of the functions of the Faculty. 


HISTORICAL NOTE 

The School of Mining, now the Faculty of Applied Science, Queen’s 
University, was founded in 1893 under an Ontario Charter which placed its 
management in the hands of a Board of Governors elected by its shareholders, 
i.e., the subscribers to its funds. While originally a Mining School it has 
been expanded to include courses of study for degrees in mining and 
metallurgy, in civil, mechanical, electrical and chemical engineering, in 
analytical chemistry and assaying, in physics, and in geology and mineralogy. 
The objects of the institution were to provide thorough instruction both 
theoretical and practical, in the above and other branches of applied science, 
and to adapt courses of study and methods of presentation to the conditions 
prevailing in Canada, so as to secure as nearly as may be a maximum useful- 
ness to the country. 

For several sessions all its Departments were housed in Carruthers 
Science Hall, which had been erected in 1889, but in view of the rapid 
success and increased requirements of the School the Provincial Legislature 
in 1900 provided for its accommodation two large buildings, Ontario Hall 
for the Departments of Mineralogy, Geology and Physics, and Fleming Hall 
for the Departments of Civil, Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. More 
recently the Provincial Government erected Gordon Hall, which is entirely 
devoted to Chemistry; and, through the generosity of Professor Nicol and 
other graduates, Nicol Hall was built for the accommodation of the class 
rooms and laboratories of the Department of Mining and Metallurgy. These 
changes permitted the Civil Engineering Department to move into Carruthers 
Hall, leaving room in Fleming Hall for the already overcrowded departments 
of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. Miller Hall, one of the finest 
buildings on the campus, was opened in 1931 for the Departments of 
Mineralogy and Geology, permitting the Department of Qiemical Engineering 
to move into Ontario Hall. 

From its inception the School of Mining was closely connected with 
the University. The students of the School of Mining received their degrees 


19 


from the University and the graduates in Science enjoyed the same rank and 
privilege as other graduates in representation upon the University Council 
and in the election of University Trustees. The stafl of the School of 
Mining constituted practically the Science Faculty of the University, some 
of its members being actively connected also with the Arts and Medical 
Faculties, and the Faculty being represented with other faculties on the 
Senate of the University. 

The School of Mining was formerly under the control of a separate 
board of Governors, but in the year 1916 it became the Faculty of Applied 
Science of Queen’s University. 

Kingston is well situated as the seat of a college of engineering and 
applied science. Geology and mineralogy, two of the fundamental subjects 
of a mining engineer’s education and also important in other scientific 
professions, are studied to best advantage where the minerals can be seen 
as they lie in nature, and where geological formations can be examined in 
situ. In a few hours a class of students can be taken to a region so rich in 
mineral species that about forty different kinds have been secured in an 
afternoon. There are several geological formations out-cropping within easy 
walking distance of the city. If to this be added the accessibility by a short 
railway journey of mines in operation, it will be seen that the opportunities 
for instructive demonstrations to classes in mineralogy, geology and mining 
are very numerous. The metallurgical works at Deloro, eighty miles from 
Kingston, are also open to our students. It is thus possible to give to the 
study of mineralogy, geology, mining and metallurgy, that practical turn 
which not only adds interest to the college course, but shortens the period 
between graduation and the attainment of proficiency and of confidence in 
professional work. 

The variety of topographical features in the surrounding country affords 
the best of material for practice in all branches of surveying, including 
railway, topographic, hydrographic and land surveying. The main line of 
the Canadian National passes through Kingston, which is also a terminus 
of the Canadian Pacific Railway. The Canadian Locomotive Works, which 
are the largest locomotive shops in Ontario, are within ten minutes’ walk of 
the University, and are open to students for study and for assisting in engine 
testing and similar work. Kingston has a large Dry Dock, in whose yards steel 
construction can be studied practically. The locks of the Rideau Canal can be 
visited at Kingston Mills, six miles from the heart of the city. There are also 
several water powers within easy distance. Students of civil, mechanical and 
electrical engineering thus have easy access to practical illustrations of their 
professional studies. 


20 


EQUIPMENT AND SPECIAL EACILITIES 

THE LIBRARY 

The Douglas Library building provides one large reading room, three 
smaller ones, a number of conference rooms, exhibition rooms and offices for 
the library and administrative staff. 

In the main reading room will be found a collection of some 5,000 
volumes of general reference works on open shelves. The general library 
includes about 160,000 volumes as well as many original manuscripts and 
prints. 

The system of classification used is that of the Library of Congress. 

Seven hundred and fifty joun.als and other serials are currently received. 

In addition to the general library there are departmental libraries for 
physics; chemistry; chemical engineering; mining and metallurgy; geology and 
mineralogy ; civil, mech.,nical and electrical engineering. 

The library of the Aledical Faculty together with a biological library, is 
separately housed in the Old Arts Building. 

The Lome Pierce Collection of Canadian Literature is very rich in first 
editions, original manuscripts and rare Canadiana. 

The Shortt-Haydon Collection of portraits and views relating to Canada 
is one of the finest collections of its kind. 

THE MUSEUMS 

The Miller Memorial Museum, named in memory of the late Willet 
G. Miller, formerly Provincial Geologist of Ontario, has recently been erected 
for the Departments of Geology and Mineralogy. The main floor is entirely 
devoted to museum purposes and contains among other things an excellent 
collection of economic minerals used in industrial processes ; a collection of at 
least a thousand mounted individual crystals, large collections illustrating the 
systematic classification of minerals and rocks ; another illustrating the ores 
found particularly in Canadian mines, a stratigraphic assembly of rocks and a 
paleontological collection illustrating the geologic life record. 

An Ethnological collection of weapons, utensils, dresses and ornaments 
is also housed in the east wing of the museum. 

The Biological Museum, in the Old Arts Building, has a large Botanical 
collection illustrating fully the flora of North America, Europe, Asia, South 
Africa, and Australia; a Zoological collection representing the Canadian fauna 
by a large number of prepared specimens of mammals, birds, reptiles, fishes, 
insects, and mollusca. 

THE LABORATORIES 

The Chemical Laboratories are in Gordon Hall. On the fourth floor 
are the laboratories of Medical Organic, Biochemistry, and Water Analysis. 


21 


On the third floor are two laboratories for General Chemistry, and a laboratory 
for Electro-chemistr>" and Colloid Chemistry. On the second or main floor 
are two laboratories for Quantitative Analysis, two for Organic Chemistry, and 
one for Industrial Chemistry. On the first or basement floor are three labora- 
tories for Qualitative Analysis, and two for Physical Chemistry. Besides these 
there are a number of small separate laboratories for research work. 

The Physics Laboratories occupy the major part of Ontario Hall. The 
basement contains the large elementary laboratory, the liquid air room, numerous 
research laboratories and the research workshop. The main floor is given over 
to undergraduate lecture and laboratory rooms. The second floor has two large 
lecture rooms, laboratory room for advanced imdergraduate classes and for re- 
search. The attic is used for workshop and storage purposes. 

The Geological and Mineralogical Laboratories are in Miller Hall. 
In the basement is a laboratory for the preparation of rock sections and for 
photography and an X-ray laboratory equipped with a Hilger X-ray spectro- 
graph. On the second floor a laboratory occupying the west wing is for elemen- 
tary classes in Geology. Along the north side of the building is a map room 
and the petrographical laboratory. On the south side a large draughting room 
is used by senior students for the preparation of maps and sections required 
in field courses. On the third floor at the west end is a large laboratory for 
blowpipe analysis, a dark room equipped with a two circle goniometer, a mono- 
chromator and Abbe refractometer. The east wing is a laboratory for post- 
graduate students, a dark room for photography, a chemical laboratory with 
space for twelve students, a grinding room for preparation of polished surfaces 
and an adjoining optical laboratory for petrographic and mineralographic work. 
Smaller laboratories for research work are equipped with a Hilger E316 
spectrograph, a Hallimond Electromagmatic concentrator and facilities for 
examination of ores by polarized light. 

The Biological Laboratories are on the main floor and in the basement 
of the Old Arts Building. There is a large laboratory for General Botany, 
one for General Zoology, and one for Medical Biology, as well as smaller 
laboratories for Plant Physiology and Advanced Botany. Laboratories are 
available also for research in Plant Physiology, Cytology, and the growth of 
populations. A very carefully arranged and classified collection of representa- 
tive invertebrate animals as well as a small but growing entomological 
collection are available for study. These supplement the Herbarium and the 
'Collection of larger animals in the Museum. 

THE OBSERVATORY 

The Observatory has a transit room, a computing room, and an equatorial 
room with revolving dome. The equatorial telescope has a six-inch objective, 
declination and right ascension circles, and a driving clock. The transit has a 


22 


three and a half inch objective. The further equipment consists chiefly of a 
striding level, a chronograph, a mean time clock, and a sidereal time clock. 

FACILITIES FOR FIELD WORK 

Geology and Mineralogy. In the vicinity of Kingston a greater variety 
of economic minerals and metalliferous ores is mined than in any similar area 
in Canada. Through the kindness of the managers the various mines may be 
visited by the Geology and Mineralogy classes, and students may thus obtain 
valuable information concerning field conditions. 

Botany and Zoology. Exceptionally good facilities for field study are 
provided in the vicinity of Kingston by the great diversity of land surfaces and 
bodies of water. A wide range of plant and animal associations are within 
easy reach of the University. 


ENGINEERING SOCIETY 

The representative student organization of the Faculty of Applied Science 
is the Engineering Society. All students registered in the Faculty of Applied 
Science are members of this society. Regular monthly meetings are held and 
the Society has been fortunate, in recent years, in securing successful 
engineers to address the students during the session. Any student member 
who wishes to read a scientific paper before the society will always find the 
executive of the Engineering Society ready and willing to arrange a date. 
Prizes are offered in connection with such student papers. 

The Society conducts a Technical Supplies Department, where all books 
prescribed, stationery, note books, drawing paper and instruments, and 
other supplies, may be purchased at prices but slightly over cost. Any books 
not in stock will be ordered on payment of a small deposit. 


FACILITIES FOR ATHLETICS 

The University provides ample facilities for athletics. A new gymnasium, 
one of the finest in Canada, was built during the summer of 1930. In the 
University Grounds is a large covered skating rink with artificial ice. 
Adjoining the University is the football field, with the George Richardson 
Memorial Stadium given by Dr. James Richardson, now Chancellor of the 
University, in memory of his brother, Captain George Richardson, a Queen’s 
graduate and a former athlete, who was killed in the Great War. There is 
room and equipment for all students who wish to take part in football, 
hockey, basketball, tennis, track athletics, swimming, boxing, fencing, of 
wrestling. 


23 


REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

The number of students admitted to the first year of the Faculty of 
Applied, Science is limited. Selection from applicants for admission will be 
made on the basis of their qualifications. Candidates must make application 
by September 1st on forms which may be obtained from the Office of the 
Registrar. This application must be accompanied by academic certificates, a 
certificate of su^ccessful vaccination, a photograph 2" x 3", and a fee of $10 
which will be applied on tuition payable at registration. This fee will be 
returned up until one week before the opening of the session if the student 
notifies the University that he cannot register. 

I.— ADMISSION BY MATRICULATION. 

*A candidate for admission into- the Faculty of Applied Science must 
present certificates showing standing in the following subjects of Pass and 
Honour Matriculation : 

Part I. Pass Matriculation in the following subjects: English, History 
{Canadian and Ancient) or Canadian History and Music, Mathematics, 
{Algebra and Geometry) , Experimental Science {Physics and Chemistry) or 
Agriculture {Parts I and 11), and any two of Latin, Greek, French, German, 
Spanish, Italian, or Arithmetic. Arithmetic to be offered by candidates from 
technical schools only. 

Part II. Honour Afatriculation in the following subjects: English, 
Mathematics {Algebra, Geometry, including Analytical Geometry, and 
Trigonometry with an average of 60%), Experimental Science {Physics 
and Chemistry) , and one of Latin, Greek, French, German, Spanish or 
Italian, History, Biology. 

Note: — Honour Matriculation in History, or in Biology, or in a Foreign 
Language, not offered under Part H may be substituted for one of the 
of Part I. 

Candidates specially qualified for an Engineering Course may be admitted 
at the discretion of the Faculty, on conditions to be determined in each case, 
even though they' do not present precisely the subjects named above. This 
provision applies to graduates of Technical Schools who have passed the 
regular matriculation examinations in the subjects taught in their schools, and 
to candidates with practical engineering experience. 

Candidates entitled to enter the Faculty of Arts may satisfy the require- 
ments of Part 1 1 by extra-mural and Summer School work. 

*The experience of many years has shown that a good foundation in, and a liking 
for mathematics are essential for success in a .Science Course. 


24 


II.— ADMISSION BY EQUIVALENT EXAMINATION 

The following certificates are accepted provided that the subjects covered 
are the same as the subjects of Ontario Junior Matriculation. 


Alberta Third Year High School. 

British Columbia Junior Matriculation (Grade XII). 

Manitoba Grade XI. 

New Brunswick Junior Matriculation. 

Newfoundland .Associate (Junior). 

Nova Scotia Grade XI. 

Ontario Middle School. 

Prince Edward Island First Class Teachers’ License or 

Second Year Certificate from Prince 
of Wales College. 

Quebec Quebec School Leaving Certificate. 

McGill Junior Matriculation. 
Saskatchewan Grade XI. 


Any one of the following certificates will be accepted in place of Honour 
Matriculation in the same subjects if the required standing has been made 
in the subjects covered. 

Alberta Fourth Year High School. 

British Columbia Senior Matriculation (Grade XIII). 

Manitoba First Class. 

New Brunswick Grammar School. 

Newfoundland Associate Grade. 

Nova Scotia Grade XH. 

Ontario Upper School. 

Prince Edward Island Plonour Diploma of Third Year, 

Prince of Wales College. 

Quebec McGill Senior Matriculation. 

Saskatchewan Grade XII. 

NOTE. — A certificate from any school which is on the list of schools 
approved by any University or Technical College of recognized standing 
in the United States will be accepted as equivalent to matriculation exam- 
ination pro tanto. 

III.— ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

A student who transfers to Queen’s University from another educational 
institution will be admitted to the year for which he is qualified. Ordinarily 
such a student must spend a minimum of two years in residence in order 
to obtain the Bachelor of Science degree. 

In view of the fact that laboratory accommodation is limited it may be 
necessary to refuse admission to certain Courses. 

A candidate for advanced standing must submit with his application a 
Calendar of the institution in which he has studied together with an official 
statement of the subjects passed and the standing made. 


25 


IV.— ADMISSION OF SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Students not proceeding to a degree may take any classes for which 
-they are prepared. The work in all classes is so arranged that those who 
wish to study, either for scientific interest or to improve their qualifications 
for any particular position, may profitably pursue their studies in the Faculty 
of Applied Science. 

The Faculty will admit under this paragraph, as special students, only 
such candidates as are fitted to take part of the classes of a course. It will 
not admit as special students those whom, on account of previous poor re- 
cords, it is no longer desirable to retain as regular students. 

Prospective students under this section should correspond with the Dean 
of the Faculty of Applied Science in regard to the arrangement of such a 
course. 


MEDALS, FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 

I.— MEDALS 

Governor-GeneraFs Medal 

The Governor-General’s Medal is awarded each year to the student of the 
graduating class who has made the highest standing throughout the four years 
of his Course. A student who has failed in any year is not eligible. Grades 
obtained on supplemental examinations will not be included in determining 
the candidate’s standing. 

Departmental Medals 

A medal may be awarded annually in each department to the student of 
the graduating class who has made the highest average standing in all subjects 
.of the third and fourth years, and secured honour standing in his fourth year. 

II.— GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

Science Research Fellowships 

1. Applications for Fellowships will be received by the Registrar up to 
May 1st. If no appointment is made by that date further applications will be 
received up to September 1st. 

2. Fellows will be selected and the character of their work will be 
determined by the Department concerned in consultation with the Dean. The 
University reserves the right to dismiss a Fellow whose work is not satis- 
factory. 

3. A student appointed to a Fellowship must carry on research work 
for the whole session and embody the results in a thesis. The research may 
take the form either of independent investigation or of assistance in an in- 
vestigation carried on by some department. The Fellow may be required to 
undertake tutorial work not to exceed six hours a week. 

4. The income of the Fellowship will be paid in five instalments, of 
which the last will be paid only after the thesis has been accepted. A candi- 
date for degree at the May Convocation must submit his thesis by April 20. 
Except by special permission, other Fellows must submit their theses not later 
than September 20. 


26 


The Milton Hersey Fellowship in Chemistry 

This Fellowship of the annual value of $400, has been endowed by 
Milton L. Hersey, M.Sc., LL.D., of Montreal. It is open to graduates of 
all universities and technical colleges. 

William Neish Fellowship in Chemistry 

This Fellowship of an annual value of $400 has been endowed by Ada 
E. Neish and Laura Neish Black of Kingston. It is open to graduate students 
in Chemistry from Queen’s or any other University. 

The holder of this Fellowship shall carry on research work at Queen’s 
for the whole session under the direction of some member of the Department 
of Chemistry and embody the results in a thesis. The Fellow shall be required 
to give laborator}’- instruction or its equivalent not to exceed nine hours a week. 

Royal Society of Canada Fellowships 

Ten annual fellowships to be known as the Royal Society of Canada 
Fellowships, each of $1500, and open on equal terms to men and women, 
have been endowed for a period of five years through the generosity of the 
Carnegie Corporation. They are tenable at institutions of learning or 
research, save in exceptional circumstances outside of Canada, and are 
available for advanced research in Literature, History, Anthropology, 
Sociology, Political Economy, or allied subjects, in French or English; and in 
Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics, Geology, Biology, or subjects associated 
with any of these sciences. 

An applicant for a Fellowship should be a graduate of a Canadian 
university or college, or should have received an equivalent training in a 
Canadian institution possessing adequate facilities in his particular subject, 
and, except in special cases, should have the Master’s degree or its equivalent, 
or, preferably, have completed one or more year’s work beyond that degree. 

Applications, addressed to “The Secretary, Royal Society of Canada 
Fellowships Board, Ottawa, Canada,” should contain particulars of the 
candidate’s age and place of birth, a full statement of his academic career, 
with copies of original papers and any other evidence of his ability or 
originality in his chosen field; also an indication of the particular work he 
proposes to undertake, at what institution, and under whose direction ; and 
should be supported by recommendations from the head of the department 
of the institution in which the candidate has studied, and from the instructors 
under whom he has chiefly worked. All these papers should be in duplicate. 

Further particulars may be obtained from the Registrar. 

The following graduates of Queen’s have held these Fellowships : 

Christine Rice, M.A., Ph.D., 1932-33. 

Harold Williams Fairbairn, B.Sc., 1932-34. 

George Alan Harcourt, M.Sc., 1933-34. 

WiLLiAAi Carruthers Gussow, M.Sc., 1936-37. 

Archibald William Currie, B.A., B.Com., 1937-38. 

John Stewart Marshall, M.A., 1938-39. 

This Fellowship is not controlled by the University. 

The Reuben Wells Leonard Fellowships 

Under the will of the late Reuben Wells Leonard provision was made for 
four Fellowships of the value of $500 to be awarded to graduates of the Uni- 


27 


versity “who are willing and qualified to undertake independent research work 
in the interests of higher culture”. These Fellowships are tenable only by 
students in attendance at Queen’s. 

Application must be made to the Registrar not later than April 1st. 

Exhibition of 1851 Science Research Scholarship. 

This scholarship, of the annual value oif £250 stg., is awarded by Her 
Majesty’s Commissioners for the Exhibition of 1851 to students who have 
given evidence of capacity for original research, and are under 26 years 
of age. A given number of scholarships are awarded annually to students 
in Canada recommended by the Universities approved by the Commissioners. 

The nominee must be a British subject, must have been a bona fide 
student of science for three years, must have been a student of the Univer- 
sity for a full year immediately before his nomination, must be a student of 
the University at the time of his nomination, and must pledge himself not 
to hold any position ofi emolument whilst holding the scholarship without 
special permission from the commissioners. He is recommended to the 
commissioners by the Senate of the University. The scholarship will be 
tenable ordinarily for two years and in cases of exceptional merit for three 
years. The scholar will, in the absence of special circumstances, be required 
to proceed to a country other than that in which he received his scientific 
training, and there pursue some investigation likely to promote technical in- 
dustries or scientific culture. The particular investigation the student pro- 
poses to pursue must be stated before a scholarship can be awarded. 

Students of the Faculty of Applied Science are eligible for this scholarship. 

Recommendations must be received at the office of the Commissioners 
before June 1. 

The following Science Research scholars have been appointed from 
Queen’s University: 

Norman R. Carmichael, M.A., 1894. 

Thomas L. Walker, M.A., 1896. 

Frederick J. Pope, M.A., 1898. 

W. C. Baker, M.A., 1900. 

C. W. Dickson, M.A., 1901. 

C. W. Knight, B.Sc., 1904. 

F. H. McDougall, M.A., B.Sc., 1905. 

Campbell Laidlaw, B.A., M.D., 1907. 

N. L. Bowen, M.A., B.Sc., 1909. 

Walter A. Bell, B.Sc., 1911. 

John R. Tuttle, M.A., 1913. 

Robert C. Cantelo, B.Sc., 1915. 

Douglas G. H. Wright, B.Sc., 1921. 

R. H. F. Manske, M.Sc., 1924. 

Donald C. Rose, M.Sc., 1924. 

H. M. Cave, M.A., 1926. 

B. W. Sargent, M.A., 1928. 

E. H. Charlesworth, M.A., 1931. 

G. S. Farnham, M.Sc., 1932. 


28 


W. J. Henderson, M.A., 1932. 

William Ernest Bennett, M.A., 1934. 

John Stewart Marshall, M.A., 1935. 

Arthur Gowsell Ward, M.A., 1937. 

The Rhodes Scholarship 

1. General Regulations : — A Rhodes Scholarship is tenable at the 
University of Oxford and may be held for three years. Since, however, 
the majority of Rhodes Scholars obtain standing which enables them to take 
a degree in two years, appointments are made for two years in the first 
instance, and a Rhodes Scholar who may wish to remain for a third year 
will be expected to present a definite plan of study for that period satisfactory 
to his College and to the Rhodes Trustees. 

Rhodes Scholars may be allowed, if the conditions are approved by their 
own College and by the Oxford Secretary to the Rhodes Trustees, either to 
postpone their third year, returning to Oxford for it after a period of work 
in their own countries, or may spend their third year in post-graduate work 
at any university of Great Britain, and in special cases at any university on 
the continent of Europe, the overseas dominions, or in the United States, but 
not in the country of their origin. 

The stipend of a Rhodes Scholar is fixed at £400 per year. At most 
Colleges, and for most men, this sum is not sufficient to meet a Rhodes 
Scholar’s necessary expenses for Term-time and Vacations, and Scholars 
who can afford to supplement it by £50 per year from their own resources 
will find it advantageous to do so. 

2. Conditions of Eligibility : — A candidate to be eligible must: 

1. Be a British subject, with at least five years’ domicile in Canada, and 
unmarried. He must have passed his nineteenth year, but not have passed 
his twenty-fifth birthday on October 1st of the year for which he is elected. 

2. Have reached such a stage in his course at one of the Universities in 
Canada that he will have completed at least two years at the university in 
question by October 1st of the year for which he is elected. 

Candidates may apply either for the province in which they have iheir 
ordinary private domicile, home or residence, or for any province in which 
they have received at least two years of their college education before applying. 

In that section of the Will in which he defined the general type of 
scholar he desired, Mr. Rhodes wrote as follows : 

“My desire being that the students who shall be elected to the scholarships 
shall not be merely bookworms, I direct that in the election of a student to a 
Scholarship regard shall be had to: 

1. his literary and scholastic attainments ; 

2. his fondness for and success in manly outdoor sports such as cricket, 
football and the like; 

3. his qualities of manhood, truth, courage, devotion to duty, sympathy 
for and protection of the weak, kindliness, unselfishness and fellowship, and 


29 


4. his exhibitions during school days of moral force of character and ot 
instincts to, lead and tO' take an interest in his schoolmates for those latter 
attributes will be likely in after life to guide him to esteem the performance 
of public duty his highest aim.” 

Full particulars may be obtained from D. R. Michener, 372 Bay St, 
Toronto, Secretary of the Selection Committee for the Province of Ontario. 
Two Scholarships may be awarded annually in the provinces of Quebec and 
Ontario if qualified candidates appear. 

Each candidate for a Scholarship is required to make application to the 
Secretary of the Committee of Selection of the Province in which he wishes 
to compete, not later than November 10th. Application forms may be obtained 
from the Registrar’s Office. 

The following graduates of Queen’s University have been awarded Rhodes 
Scholarships : 

J. M. Macdonnell, M.A., 1905. 

A. G. Cameron, B.A., 1906. 

Norman S. Macdonnell, M.A., 1907. 

Stanley Scott, B.A., 1911. 

H. S. Smith, M.A., 1912. 

A. G. Gumming, M.A., 1914. 

H. R. MacCallum, B.A., 1919. 

K. E. Taylor, B.A., 1920. 

A. D. WiNSPEAR, B.A., 1922. 

L. F. Kindle, B.A., 1925. 

D. A. Skelton, B.A., 1926. 

J. G. Davoud, B.A., 1936. 

G. M. Brown, M.D., C.M., 1937. 

G. P. Grant, 1938. 

This Scholarship is not controlled by the University. 

III.— SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 

Scholarships are tenable in the session following award. By special 
permission of Faculty, the recipient of a Scholarship, available in the third 
and fourth years of his course, may postpone the use of the Scholarship for 
one year in order to engage in practical work connected with his chosen 
profession. 

Scholarships and prizes are awarded on the standing obtained by a student 
on a regular year of work. A student who is repeating his year is not 
eligible. 

A student who is awarded a University, Near, or Leonard Scholarship 
may not hold more than one additional Scholarship. 

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR AWARD IN FIRST YEAR 
University Scholarships . 

Four scholarships O'f $100 each, and four of $75 each will be awarded to 
students in the first year on the basis of the returns in all subjects having 
examinations, namely, English, Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics and Surveying. 

The scholarships will be awarded at the May Convocation, and the money 
will be available in the next session provided that the student registers in 
the Faculty of Applied Science. 


30 


Robert Bruce Scholarships. 

Under provisions of the will of the late Robert Bruce of Quebec the 
University has established a Scholarship worth about $75 in each of tne 
Faculties of Arts, Applied Science, and Medicine. Until 1948 the award is 
limited to students of Scottish extraction. 

The Scholarship in each Faculty will be awarded at the end of the first 
year to the student who has made the highest standing on the regular exam- 
inations of that year. One third of the value of each scholarship will be 
paid to the winner in each of the second, third, and fourth years of his 
Course provided that he is in attendance in the Faculty in which the award 
was made. 

The N. F. Dupuis Scholarship. 

Value $50. This scholarship has been founded by the graduates as a 
mark of their appreciation of the long and effective services of Dr. N. F. 
Dupuis, as Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science and Professor of Mathe- 
matics. The scholarship is of the value of $50, and is awarded to the student 
who makes the highest marks in Mathematics of the first year at the April 
Examinations. 

The Dr. William Moffat Scholarship. 

Value $20. This scholarship has been founded by Dr. William Moffat, 
of Utica, and is awarded annually to the student making the highest standing 
in first year chemistry. The award will be made on combined results of class 
work and examination. 

William Wallace Near Scholarship 

Value $100. Established under provisions of the will of the late William 
Wallace Near of Toronto. To be awarded to the student in the first year who 
has the highest average in all the work of the year. 

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR AWARD IN SECOND YEAR 
University Scholarships 

Six scholarships of $100 each, to be awarded in sections A B C D and E F G 
in proportion to the registration in these sections, on the basis of the returns 
in all subjects having examinations, that is, in all subjects except Drawing 
and Shop Work. 

Association of Professional Engineers Scholarship 

Value $100. Founded by the Association of Professional Engineers of 
Ontario. Awarded in alternate years tO' the student in Courses ABCDM 
and EFGH who makes the highest average in the work of the second year. 
To be awarded to a student in EFGH in 1939-40. 

Mowat Scholarship. 

Value $40. Founded by the late John McDonald Mowat, B.A., '95. 
Awarded to the student in the Faculty of Applied Science who obtains the 
highest average on the examinations at the end of the second year. 

William Wallace Near Scholarships 

Value $100. Established under the provisions of the will of the late 
William Wallace Near of Toronto. To be awarded to the student in the 
second year who has the highest average in all the work of the year. 


31 


Dr. William H. Nichols Scholarship in Chemistry 

Founded by Dr. William H. Nichols. 

A Scholarship of the value of $40' will be awarded to the student obtaining 
the highest marks during the year in Qualitative Analysis I. 

The P. D. Ross Scholarships. 

Two scholarships of the value of $100 and $50 respectively. These 
scholarships are awarded annually to the students obtaining highest and second 
highest standing in the subjects common to the courses of the second year. 

Science Tl Scholarship 

Value $20. Awarded in the Faculty of Applied Science to the student 
with the highest average standing in the term work and examinations of the 
second year. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES FOR AWARD IN THIRD YEAR 

The Joseph Abramsky Scholarship in Mechanical Engineering. 

Value $50. Founded by his sons in memory of the late Joseph Abramsky. 
Awarded to the student in the Faculty of Applied Science who obtains highest 
standing in Mechanical Engineering during his third year. 

The Manley B. Baker Scholarships in Geology. 

Founded by Agnes Moreland Baker. Two Scholarships of the value of 
$125 and $75 will be awarded annually to the students in the Faculties of 
Applied Science or Arts obtaining highest and second highest standing in the 
first three courses in Geology. These may include Mineralogy 10a (Arts) or 
Mineralogy III (Science). If two students are equal preference will be given 
to the one whose need is greater. 

The Kenneth B. Carruthers Scholarships in Mining and Metallurgy. 

Value $110 each. Founded in memory of Major Kenneth B. Carruthers, 
B.Sc., who was killed at Passchendaele in October, 1917. Two scholarships 
are awarded annually on the results of third year work, one to the student 
in Mining and Metallurgical Engineering (Course A) and the other to the 
student in Metallurgical Engineering (Course M) making the highest standing 
in the whole year’s work. 

Isaac Cohenl Scholarship in Electrical Engineering 

Value $100. Awarded to the student in the Faculty of Applied Science 
who has obtained at the end of his third year the highest standing in the 
following subjects: Hydraulics I, Mechanical Engineering I, Electrical Engi- 
neering II and III, Physics V, and Mathematics VII. 

The Reuben Wells Leonard Fellowships 

Under the will of the late Reuben Wells Leonard provision is made for 
two Scholarships of the value of $150 each and one of the value of $200. 
One of these Scholarships is awarded in each Faculty to the student standing 
highest at the end of his penultimate year. The student must be in residence 
in his final year. 

Susan Near Scholarships 

Five scholarships of the value of $100 each. Ifstablishcd under the 
provisions of the will of the late Susan Near of Toronto. To be 
awarded at the end of the third year by Departments in proportion to the 


32 

number of students in each Department. The exact distribution of scholar- 
ships will be announced at the beginning of each session. Eligibility for one 
of these scholarships requires an average of at least 66% on the work of 
the third year with no failures. 

William Wallace Near Scholarships 

Three scholarships of the value of $100 each. Established under the pro- 
visions of the will of the late William Wallace Near of Toronto. To be 
awarded at the end of the third year to the best students in each of the three 
Courses, Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, and Civil Engineering. Eligibility 
for one of these scholarships requires an average of at least 66% on the work 
of the third year with no failures. 

Engineering Institute of Canada Prize. 

Value $25. Awarded by the Engineering Institute of Canada to the' 
student in any department of engineering, who, in the year prior to his 
graduating year, has proved himself most deserving, as disclosed by the 
examination results of the year in combination with his activities in the 
students’ engineering organization, or with a local branch of a recognized 
engineering society. 

Fifth Field Company Prize. 

Value $40. The Fifth Field Company Prize is provided by funds accumu- 
lated for this purpose by the officers, N.CO.’s and sappers of that unit since 
the war, and is given to the student of the third year in courses EF or G who 
makes the highest standing in Hydraulic Engineering I. 

PRIZES FOR AWARD IN FOURTH YEAR 
The L. M. Arkley Prize. 

Value $40. This is a prize founded by the Scots Run Fuel Corporation of 
Morgantown, W. Va., in recognition of Professor Arkley’s interest in the 
proper methods of purchasing, analyzing and burning coal. To be awarded to 
the fourth year student in Mechanical Engineering who gives evidence that 
he understands the sampling and analyzing of coal and submits, before April 
1st of each year, the best paper on the phase of the subject assigned. 

The E. T. Sterne Prize in Chemical Engineering. 

Value $25. To be awarded to a student in Chemical Engineering after finish- 
ing his third year, for the best essay describing his summer’s work. Essays to 
be handed in by December 31st. The donor desires that emphasis be laid on a 
discussion of the theoretical principles in Chemistry and Physics underlying 
any one of the manufacturing processes described. 

GENERAL SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 

B’nai B’rith Kingston, Bursary 

Value $50. Founded by the B’nai B’rith Lodge of Kingston. 

This Bursary will be awarded annually to a student of promising ability 
but straitened circumstances. The award will be made on the basis of the 
April examinations. Applications will be received up until April 1 of each 
year. 

Prizes of The Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. 

Premiums and prizes at the discretion of the Council may be given 
annually for papers read by student-members of the Institute and affiliated 
students during the year. Any such award will be made by the Council 
within three months after the Annual Meeting. 


33 


Engineering Society Prizes. 

The Engineering Society of Queen’s University offers two prizes of 
$15.00 and $10.00 for the two best papers on scientific subjects, by members 
of the society. These papers must be read before the society, and five papers, 
at least, must be presented before the prizes will be awarded. These prizes 
are open for competition to all students of Engineering. 

Khaki University and Y.M.C.A. Memorial Fund 

This fund is part of a sum, left from the Khaki University after the War, 
which was divided among the Canadian Universities. 

The interest, amounting to $240, will be used to award one or more 
scholarships open to undergraduate students in any Faculty. In awarding these 
scholarships the need as well as the standing of applicants will be considered 
and preference will be given to returned men, or sons or daughters of soldiers 
of the Great War. Applications will be received by the Registrar up to 
April 1st. 

George J. MacKay Prize in Metallurgy 

Value $25. A prize given by the Mining and Metallurgical Society of 
Queen’s University in memory of Professor George J. MacKay, formerly 
Head of the Department of Metallurgy at Queen’s University. This prize 
will be awarded annually for seven years to the student in any year who 
submits, by February 1st, the best essay dealing with some branch of 
Metallurgy. 

The A. E. Segsworth Prize. 

Value $40. This is a prize founded by R. F. Segsworth, Esq., Toronto, 
in memory of his brother, A. E. Segsworth, B.A., Ph.D. The prize is awarded 
to the student of any year who hands in before December 1st the best account 
of his previous summer’s experience in practical underground mining. 

Prize of Society of Chemical Industry 

Value $25. The Society of Chemical Industry offers an annual prize of 
$25 to be awarded to the undergraduate student in any branch of chemistry 
who presents a paper on his summer’s work, or on any other chemical subject 
which he may select. This paper may be a thesis or paper required in his 
regular work of the year. The work or subject treated must relate to some 
branch of chemistry. Essays must be submitted not later than February 
28th to the Secretary of the Ottawa Section of the Society of Chemical 
Industry. The successful competitor will be called upon to read his winning 
essay at a regular meeting of the Ottawa Section of the Society. 

IV.— STUDENT EXCHANGES 

It is probable that from time to time student exchanges will be arranged 
with French and German universities. Applications will be received by the 
Registrar from final year and graduate students. 

V.— THE DOUGLAS TUTORSHIPS 

At the beginning of session 1910-11 a gift from Dr. James Douglas, of 
New York, led to the establishment of a system by which first year students 
were tutored by men selected from the senior years. The instruction is given 
out of class hours and as each tutor gives his whole attention to not more 
than five students in a period, the result is that of individual teaching. 


34 


REGULATIONS 

N.B. — Students taking the regular course are subject to all Rules and 
Regulations immediatelv upon publication, unless otherwise specified. 

1. The Faculty may at any time, either during the term, or after the close 
of the term, require any student to withdraw whose conduct, attendance, work 
or progress is deemed unsatisfactory, 

2. Registration. — Students of the first year must register and pay fees on 
the day before the opening of session. Students of other years will register 
and pay fees on the first day of session. A student who fails to register 
at the prescribed time must pay an additional fee of $3.00 on the first day 
with $1.00 for each day after that date, unless granted' exemption by the 
Faculty. No student proceeding to a degree will be allowed to register after 
the seventh day of the session except by special permission of the Faculty, 
which permission must be obtained before the opening of session. 

Any student entering the Faculty of Applied Science for the first time 
must submit a certificate showing successful vaccination. 

3. Attendance. — Students are required to attend seven-eighths of their class 
lectures before permission will bo given to write the examinations, and seven- 
eighths of their laboratory hours before their laboratory work will be certified. 
Exemption from this rule can be obtained only on application to the Faculty. All 
absences for whatever cause, including illness or late registration, must not 
exceed one-eighth of the total number of hours of work required in any subject. 

4. Courses. — All students must take the subjects required in their 
courses in conformity with the calendars of their year of attendance. If a 
student wishes to change his course, he must first obtain the permission of 

the Faculty. 

5. Sessional Examinations. — Sessional examinations are held in all the 
subjects prescribed in the various courses. Fifty per cent, is required in 
each) subject for pass standing. In determining a student’s standing at a 
sessional examination, professors are empowered to take into account his 
entire class record. 

Regular students must take the April examinations in all subjects in 
which they are registered provided that examinations are held. Failure 
in more than four classes, including practical classes in which no written 
examinations are held, involves the loss of the session. A student failing 
in not more than four classes is given supplemental examinations in the 
following September, a mark of 55% being required on each examination. 
If he fails in more than one of these classes he may not proceed to the next 
higher year but must repeat a year’s work, the time-table for which will 
be drawn up by a committee. If a student repeating the work of any year fails 
in classes enough to involve the loss of the year he must withdraw. 


35 


A student may not enter the third year until he has passed all the 
examinations of the first year; or the fourth year until he has passed 
all the examinations of the second year. Engineering Field Work I is 
regarded as a second year class and comes under this regulation both in 
respect to back classes and tO' admission to the fourth year. A student who 
is debarred from entering the third year because of back classes in the first 
year, or from entering the fourth year because of back classes in the second 
year, will not be allowed to write subsequent examinations in these classes 
without special permission from the Faculty. 

6. Repeaters. — No student may repeat more than one year of his course 
except by special permission of the Faculty. 

7. Mid-Term Examinations. — Examinations are held for all first year 
students about the middle of the Autumn term in the regular class hours. 

8. Mid-Session Examinations. — Two hour examinations in all subjects are 
held for first and second year students the week before the Christmas vacation. 
A student repeating his first year who fails in four or more of these examina- 
tions will be required to withdraw from the faculty. A student repeating 
his second year who fails in more than four subjects will be required to with- 
draw. A proper proportion of fees paid will be refunded. The attention of 
all students is called to Regulation No. 1. 

Final examinations are held at the beginning of the second term in all 
subjects in which the instruction terminates at that time. No other papers are 
set in these subjects until the following September. 

9. Supplemental Examinations. — Unless specially excused by the Fac- 
ulty upon application received at the Registrar’s office before July 15th, all 
students who fail in one or more subjects of their year up to a total of four 
must write supplemental examinations in all such subjects in September of 
the same year, as a condition of admission to the next higher year of their 
course. 

A student who has one failure in the April examinations of his final year 
must write this class off by the following April, a pass mark of 55% being 
required. 

A student who has not been registered in the session in which he wishes 
to take any supplemental examinations must pay the registration fee of 
$10 in addition to the examination fee. 

Students may take September examinations at approved outside centres if 
application is made by July 15th to the Registrar. 


36 


10. Penalty For Failure To Write. — If a student fails to write an exam- 
ination from which he has not been excused by the Faculty, a penalty of $10 
is charged. The student must pay in addition the regular supplemental 
examination fee of $10.00. 

11. Practical Work. — Students are required to take the practical courses 
given in the calendar unless they have followed similar courses in other 
educational institutions, but instructors may, at their discretion, modify the 
work for students who have had experience in the field, in engin- 
eering works, etc. Such students may be set immediately at more advanced 
work than that required of those who have not had such experience. 

12. Excursions. — The excur'^ions are compulsory for all fourth year stu- 
dents in courses A, D, E, F, and G, and third year students in course B. 

13. Vacation Work. — Before applying for a degree a candidate is re- 
quired to submit certificates of having had at least six months’ employment 
of a nature that in the opinion of the departments concerned shall have 
given him suitable experience in the practice of his profession. 

14. Graduation. — Applications for degrees must be made before March 15 
on forms which will be supplied by the Registrar. 


37 


GENhRAL INFORMATION 

EXPENSES 

The following statement of expenses for a session in normal times is 
compiled from information obtained from students who have kept an ac- 
count of their expenditures. Personal expenses are not included in the 


estimate. 

Class, Hospital, Athletic and other fees $255.00 $255.00 

Board, lodging and washing 250.00 to 325.00 

Books and Stationery 35.00 to 45.00 

Excursions, Field and Technical 15.00 to 45.00 


$555.00 to $670.00 

The average student pays for board from $4.50 to $5.50 a week; and for 
a room from $2.00 to $3.00 a week. A few pay as little as $6.00 for board 
and room; whilst others, with more expensive tastes, pay over $8.00. Any 
student, however, may count on finding satisfactory board and lodging at 
from $6.50 to $7.50 a week. 

Lists of Boarding Houses for men students may be obtained from the 
Registrar. Meals may be obtained at the cafeteria in the Students’ Union. 

PHYSICAL WELFARE OF STUDENTS 

Every student is required upon registration to contribute $4 towards a 
health insurance fund. In return the student has the free services of the Uni- 
versity medical officer and a special hospital rate of fifty cents a day. Details 
of the plan are given in a printed leaflet which may be had on request. 

All students in their first year are required to take physical training for 
two hours a week, unless excused on account of military training with the 
Officers’ Training Corps. They are examined by the University physician, 
who prescribes proper exercises to correct any physical defects. 

VACCINATION 

Every student registering for the first time must submit evidence of 
successful vaccination. 

TUBERCULIN TESTS 

Tuberculin tests will be given to all students entering Queen’s Uni- 
versity for the first time in September 1939. This service will be free of 
charge but those who react positively must have an X-ray examination at 
their own cost. 

STUDENT SELF-GOVERNMENT 

Queen’s was the first University in Canada to introduce student self- 
government. All students are members of the Alma Mater Society, the chief 
instrument of student government, and are expected to share in its duties and 
responsibilities. 

ALMA MATER SOCIETY LECTURE 

In 1939, as a contribution from the student body to the Centenary En- 
dowment Fund, the Alma Mater Society gave the University its accumulated 
reserve of $1711. The income will be used to provide an annual lecture to 
be known as the Alma Mater Society Lecture. 


38 


THE CANADIAN OFFICERS’ TRAINING CORPS 

The Queen’s University Contingent of the C.O.T.C., formed at the out- 
break of the Great War under Lieut.-Col. A. B. Cunningham, was organized 
as a Unit of the M(ilitia in February, 1915. Reorganized after the war by 
Col. A. Macphail, CM.G., D.S.O., it is now commanded by Lieut.-Col. 
R. O. Earl, and consists of three companies, “A” Coy. (Arts), “B” Coy. 
(Medicine), and “C” Coy. (Science). 

The training, after the recruit year, prepares for examinations. “A” cer- 
tificate qualifies for the rank of Lieutenant, and “B” certificate for that of 
Captain. 

Commissions in the Permanent Force are offered from time to time to 
qualified members of the C.O.T.C. Students who enrol in their first year, 
complete the year’s training, and are returned as fully efficient, are excused 
from Physical Training. 

A Science student who obtains either certificate “A” or “B” in the Cana- 
dian Officers’ Training Corps at Queen’s may, on application, be given credit for 
the surplus marks which he obtains over his military pass mark either in the 
“A” or the “B” certificate examination or in both. This credit may be used to 
supplement the marks gained on any class which the student may select in his 
third or fourth year. If he has a surplus both in the “A” and in the “B” 
certificate he may use both credits separately in two selected classes of the 
third and/or fourth year, but both credits may not be used in the same 
year. In no case may this credit be reckoned for obtaining honours or prizes. 


EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 

An Employment Service has been in successful operation at the University 
for several years. It is under the jurisdiction of the Service Control Com- 
mittee of the Engineering Society and administered by the Secretary of the 
General Alumni Association. It is financed by the Engineering Society and 
the University. The objects of the Service are to assist graduates in all 
Faculties to secure suitable positions, and to help students to obtain work 
during vacation periods. 

Communications should be addressed : Manager, Employment Service, 
Queen’s University. 

FRATERNITIES 

By resolution of Senate no student registered with the University may 
form or become a member of any chapter of any externally-affiliated fraternity 
or sorority at or near Kingston. 


39 


THE STUDENTS’ MEMORIAL UNION 

The Students’ Memorial Union was built to commemorate the service of 
the students and graduates of Queen’s in the Great War. 

Every male student is a member of the Union, which is really a club, 
where the men of all Faculties may meet in a University building designed for 
that particular purpose and privilege. 

There are the usual club facilities, dining room, lounge, billiard room, read- 
ing room and committee rooms. 

FEES 

Students will pay upon registration the Tuition Fees indicated below. 
A student may not attend classes until he has paid at least the first in- 
stalment of his fees, nor enter upon the work of the second term until 
he has paid his fees in full. 

Sessional Fees (including registration, tuition, examination, degree, library, 
laboratory, health insurance and student interests. The fee for athletics, 
which is part of student interests, gives admission to all home games except 


play-offs) : — 

If paid on registration $255.00 

If paid in instalments : 

1st payment on registration $130.00 

2nd payment, on or before Jan. 6 $130.00 

Fifth Year in Commerce. 

If paid in full on registration $150.00 

Student Interests $23.00 

This includes all sessional fees. 


(This year is taken in the Faculty of Arts under regulations of that 
Faculty.) 

Deposits. — For covering expenses of breakages, etc., a first year student 
must deposit $5 with the Treasurer. If at any time the amount of breakages, 
etc., exceeds $3, an additional deposit of $5 must be made. 

For second, third and fourth years the deposit is $5 except in the follow- 


ing courses : — 

Second Year Courses A, B, C, D, M $10.00 

Third Year Courses A and M 10.00 

Third Year Courses B and D 15.00 

Fourth Year Course B 15.00 


Charges will be made for the use of platinum, and other expensive 
chemicals and apparatus. All money to the credit of the depositors will be 
returned at the end of the session on presentation of the deposit receipt pro- 
perly certified. 


40 


The fees below are payable as they are incurred. 


Special Charges. 

Pro tanto allowance of courses $10.00 

Late registration. See Regulation 2 3.00 

Supplemental Examination, one subject 10.00 

Each additional subject 2.00 

Writing at outside centre in April (if permitted) 5.(X) 

Late application for supplemental examination or graduation 3.00 

Special fee for Surveying Field Course 15.00 

Fees for Single Classes. 

Registration 10.00 

Examination 10.00 

Student Interests 23.00 

Any course of lectures 20.00 

Drawing, One Course, per Session 20.00 

Surveying, One Course, per Session 20.00 

Assaying Laboratory, per Session 10.00 

Chemical Laboratory, per Session 20.00 

Petrographical Laboratory, per Session 10.00 


Mechanical, Electrical or General Engineering Laboratory, per Session 20.00 

Fees for M.Sc. Work 

^Total Sessional Fee (including laboratory fee, and student interests) $143.00 
Laboratory deposit 10.00 

Additional charges may' be made in the case of students requiring special 
material and apparatus. 

*If a student decides to spread his work over two 3 "ears, he will pay each 
year $87.50 for total sessional fee, and $10 for laboratory deposit. 

In addition to regular examination fees, supplemental or otherwise, there 
will be the following fees for special examinations : 


Examination in one paper $5.00 

Examination in two or more papers 10.00 


Graduation and Other Fees 

The Graduation Fee is payable before March 15. This fee is returned to 
imsuccessful candidates. 

No graduation fee is charged for B.Sc. unless the degree is taken in 
absentia, in which case there is a charge of $10.00. 


Graduation M.Sc $20.00 

Admission ad eundem statiim 10.00 


41 


DEGREES 


1. Bachelor of Science. 


1. The degree of B.Sc. will be given on the satisfactory completion of a 
four years’ course in any one of the following departments: — 


A. 

B. 

C. 

D. 
M. 

E. 

F. 

G. 

H. 


Mining Engineering. 
Chemistry. 

Mineralogy and Geology. 
Chemical Engineering. 
Metallurgical Engineering. 
Civil Engineering. 
Mechanical Engineering. 
Electrical Engineering. 
Physics. 


A graduate in any course who desires to take the degree of B.Sc. in any 
other course, or a student desiring to change from one course to another, 
shall take all the classes which he has not already passed in that course or 
by examination satisfy the Department in charge of those classes as to his 
knowledge of the subjects involved. 

Graduation with Honours. — Honour standing will be given to any 
student who graduates with an average of seventy-five per cent, or upwards 
on the full work of the fourth year of his course. Credit for Honour standing 
will be given on the diploma, and in the list of graduates a mark of distinction 
will be placed against the names of those graduating with Honour standing. 


The following percentages are required for standing in all courses : 

Division I. — 75% and over 

Division H. — 62 - 74% 

Division HI. — 50 - 61% 

2. The degrees of B.A. and B.Sc. will be given on the satisfactory com- 
pletion of a six years’ course in Arts and Applied Science. See page 59. 

A candidate for graduation must have completed either a four or a 
, 5 ix years’ course and have passed all the required examinations. 


42 


II. Master of Science. 

The Degree of Master of Science (M.Sc.) is granted to candidates who 
have graduated with the B.Sc. degree and thereafter have been m attendance 
in the Faculty of Applied Science for at least one full session. 

The work prescribed consists of two parts, as follows : 

A. Research and Thesis representing not less than half the session’s work. 
Except by special permission the thesis must be submitted by April 20. A 
candidate who is allowed to postpone his thesis must submit it by September 20 
if he desires a degree at the fall convocation. 

B. One or both of the following which must be cognate to the field of 
study and tested by examinations : 

(a) Prescribed lecture courses. These, except by special permission of 
the Faculty, must be advanced courses (i.e. courses not offered for any B.Sc. 
degree). If allowed to take an undergraduate course, the candidate must 
pass a special examination of a standard higher than is exacted from B.Sc. 
candidates. 

(b) Directed special studies with reports. 

Written examinations will be set on the lecture courses prescribed and also 
on the directed special studies and a minimum standing of 66% must be 
made on each paper. 

An oral examination will be given on the subject of the thesis. 

Candidates must apply for permission to enter a M.Sc. course at least one 
week before the opening of the session. 

No candidate who has not made an average of 66% in his final 
year will be accepted for the M.Sc. course except by special recommendation 
of the Department concerned. 

A committee consisting of the Vice-Principal, the Dean, the Head of the 
Department concerned and the Professor or Instructor, selected to supervise the 
candidate’s work shall report to the Faculty on his fitness to enter a M.Sc. 
course and recommend to the Faculty the prescribed programme of work. On 
the recommendation of this committee, the Faculty may decline to accept a 
candidate with the formal requirement of 66% if because of lack of space, 
equipment, time or for other reasons the department concerned finds itself 
unable to conduct the work. 

A candidate in full time employment in the University or elsewhere will not 
normally be accepted as a candidate for the M.Sc. 

THE INSTITUTION OF CIVIL ENGINEERS OF GREAT BRITAIN 

The Council of the Institution of Civil Engineers of Great Britain has 
recognized the degree of B.Sc. of Queen’s University obtained in the depart- 
ments of Civil, Mechanical and Electrical Engineering as exempting from 
Sections A and B of the Institution Associate Membership Examination. 
Graduates in the departments of Mining and Metallurgy are exempt from 
Section B. 


43 


DOMINION LAND SURVEYORS 

Revised Statutes Canada Chap. 117 Sec. 22, 1927 
Every person wno has followed a regular course of study in all the 
branches of education required for this act for admission as a Dominion Land 
Surveyor in any college or university where a complete course of theoretical and 
practical instruction in surveying is organized, and who, after examination, had 
thereupon received from such college or university a degree attesting to his 
completion of the said course of instruction, which degree shall be the degree 

of Bachelor of Science shall be exempt from serving three years as 

aforesaid as an articled pupil, and shall be entitled to examination for a com- 
mission after being admitted upon examination as aforesaid as an articled pupil, 
and serving one year under articles with a Dominion Land Surveyor including 
six months’ actual service with him in the field. 

ONTARIO LAND SURVEYORS 

Revised Statutes Ontario 1927, Chap. 201, Sec. 28 (1). 

The privilege of a shortened term of apprenticeship shall also be accorded 

to any graduate of the or to any graduate in Civil Engineering or of 

Mining Engineering of Queen’s University at Kingston, and such per- 

son shall not be required to pass the preliminary examination for admission to 
apprenticeship, and shall only be bound to serve under articles with a practicing 
surveyor, duly filed as required by section 31, during twelve successive months 
of actual practice after which on complying with all the other requirements 
he may undergo the examination for admission to practice. 


44 


COURSES. 

A. Mining Engineering. 

B. Chemistry. 

C. Mineralogy and Geology. 

D. Chemical Engineering. 

M. Metallurgical Engineering. 

E. Civil Engineering. 

F. Mechanical Engineering. 

G. Electrical Engineering. 

H. Physics. 


First Year, All Courses 

Lect. Hrs. Lab. Hrs. 

per week, per week. Page. 


English 

2 

0 

61 

Mathematics I 

2 

0 

63 

Mathematics II 

2 

0 

63 

Mathematics III 

2 

0 * 

63 

Mathematics IV 

2 

0 

64 

Projection 

0 

3 

117 

Physics 1, & II 

4 

2 

66, 67 

Chemistry I. (!)♦ 

3 

3 

71 

Drawing I 

0 

3 

116 

Surveying I 

0 

2 

105 


— 

— 

— 

Second Year 
Courses A, B, C, D, 

17 

M. 

13 

Total 30 

Mathematics V 

3 

0 

64 

Descriptive Geometry 

0 

2 

117 

Physics XIV 

3a, 2b 

4a, 2b 

68 

Qualitative Analysis I. (Chem. 2)* 

2 

6 

73 

Mineralogy I. (1)’*' 

la, 2b 

2 

84 

Geology I 

2 

0 

80 

General Engineering I 

2 

0 

98 

Surveying II 

1 

3 

105 

Drawing II 

0 

3 

116 


14a 

20 a 

Total 34a 


14b 

18b 

Total 32b 

*The No. of the same course given in the Arts Faculty. 




Students in Courses A, C and E must take Surveying Field Work. See 

p. 106. 


45 


Courses E, F, G. 

Lect. Hrs. Lab. Hrs. 
per week, per week. 


Mathematics V 3 0 

Astronomy II 1 0 

Descriptive Geometry 0 2 

Physics III 2 2 

Physics IV 2 2 

General Chemistry II 2 0 

General Engineering 1 2 0 

Mechanical Engineering IX 1 2 

Surveying II 1 3 

Drawing III 0 5a, 3b 

Shop Work 0 3 


Page. 

64 

65 
117 

67 

67 

72 

98 

112 

105 

117 

115 


14 19a Total 33a 

17b Total 31b 

Students in Courses A, C and E must take Surveying Field Work. See 

p. 106. 

A.— MINING ENGINEERING. 

This course is necessarily a very broad one, so that it may give a foun- 
dation for whatever branch of the profession a graduate may enter. 
Experience has shown that graduates do not usually follow any narrow 
differentiation which they make during their course, but are governed by 
many other factors in the practice of Mining Engineering. These factors 
are often out of their control, and the wisest plan in a four years’ course 
appears to be, not to specialize, but by a broad training in the final years 
to obtain a suitable introduction to any branch of the work. 


There are, however, certain well known avenues towards professional 
work, such as a good training and a manipulative skill in drafting, chemical 
analysis, and surveying. These subjects are essential for almost any profes- 
sional position in mining and metallurgy, and are therefore perfected as far 
as is possible while at college. 

At the present time there are no summer classes, or summer field work 
in mining or metallurgy. Under these conditions the student can, usually, 
obtain practical and remunerative work during four or five months each 
summer. This work, if in connection with Mining, Metallurgy or Survey- 
ing is considered to be more useful as a training than practical work under 
academic supervision. 

Visits are paid to mines and smelters. One trip at least is required of 
each student, the expense not to be more than twenty-five dollars. 


46 


First and Second Years 
See Page 44. 

Third Year 

Before entering the third year in Mining Engineering it will be necessary 
for the student to satisfy the department that he is physically fit for the work 
he intends to follow. This refers particularly to examination of eyes and 
chest. 

Lect. Hrs. Lab. Hrs. 



per week. 

per week 

Page. 

Surveying Field Work 


106 

Quantitative Analysis I. (3)* 

1 

3 

75 

Mineralogy IV. (11)* 

2 

2 

86 

Geology IV 

1 

0 

81 

Geology III. (b) (10b)* .... 

2b 

2b 

80 

Mining I 

2 

2a, lb 

88 

Ore Dressing 

la, 2b 

0 

90 

Metallurgy II 

2 

0 

92 

Thermodynamics I 

1 

0 

113 

General Engineering V 

1 

3 

100 

General Engineering III 

0 

2 

99 

Electrical Engineering I 

2 

2 

106 

Fire Assaying 

lb 

3b 

94 


— 

— 

— 


13a 

14a Total 27a 


17b 

Fourth Year 

Lect. Hrs. 

18b Total 35b 

Lab. Hrs. 


per week. 

per week 

Page. 

Mechanical Engineering IV. . . 

2 

0 

Ill 

Geology V 

1 

0 

81 


Geology VIII. (15)^ 

Hydraulics IV 

Metallurgy IV 

Milling 

Mining II 

Mining III 

Economics I 

Summer Essay 


81 

102 

92 

90 

88 

89 
62 

90 


16 

•■The No. of the same course given in the Arts Faculty. 


14 


Total 30 


47 


To those students who wish to* do further work in Geology the following 

optional course in the fourth year is 

offered. Only specially recommended 

students will be allowed to take this ( 

:ourse. 



Fourth Year, Geology Opttox 




Lect. Hrs. 

Lab. Hrs. 



per week. 

per week Pago. 

Geology II 

0 

2 

80 

Geology V 

1 

0 

81 

Geology VII 

0 

2b 

81 

Geology VIII 

2 

0 

81 

Cjeology X 

0 

3 

82 

Mineralogy II 

2b 

2b 

85 

Mineralogy III 


2a 

85 

Mineralogy VI 

0 

3b 

87 

Mining II : 

3 

0 

88 

Milling 

0 

3 

90 

Metallurgy IV 

3 

0 

92 

Hydraulics IV 

2 

0 

102 

Mechanical Engineering IV 

2 

0 

111 

Economics I 

3 

0 

62 

Summer Essay 



90 


18a 

10a Total 28a 


18b 

15b Total 

33b 

B.— CHEMISTRY (Industrial and Research) 


This course is designed to fit men 

for the profession 

of expert chemists, 

teachers of chemistry, specialists in all 

industrial professions where chemistry 

serves as the basis of the industry. Graduates are fitted 

to do constructive 

work in research laboratories and in 

industrial plants. 



First and Second Years 



See Page 44. 



Third 

Year 




Lect. Hrs. 

Lab. Hrs. 



per week. 

per week Page. 

Quantitative Analysis II. (13)* 

2 

6a. 10b 

75 

Industrial Chemistry II. (17)* 

2 

3 

77 

Physical Chemistry I. (14)* 

2 

3 

76 

Organic Chemistry I. (12)* 

2 

3 

73 

General Chemistry III 

2 

0 

72 

Metallurgy II 

2 

0 

92 

Mineralogy III 


2a 

85 

German A 


0 

61 


17a 

17a Total 

34a 


15b 

19b Total 

34b 


*Tlie No. of the same course given in the Arts Faculty. 


Fourth Year 


Lect. Hrs. Lab. Hrs. 

per week, per week Page. 


Organic Chemistry II. ( 22 )* 

2 

6 

74 

Physical Chemistry II. (25)* 

2 

3 

76 

Physical Chemistry III. (24)* 

2 

3 

77 

Industrial Chemistry Ilia 

2a 

3a 

78 

Colloid Chemistry II 

2 

2a 

79 

Economics I 

3 

0 

62 

Scientific German 

2 

0 

62 


Option in Chemistry 




General and Inorganic Chemistry IV, Organic 
Chemistry IV, Quantitative Analysis IV, Physi- 
cal Chemistry IV or Industrial Chemistry IV. 

0 

9b 

73-78 


15a 

17a 

Total 32a 


13b 

21b 

Total 34b 


*The No. of the same course given in the Arts Faculty. 


C.— MINERALOGY AND GEOLOGY 

This course is designed to meet the requirements of students who desire 
a theoretical and practical knowledge of the constitution and history of the 
Earth. It furnishes a foundation for the professions of mineralogy, geo- 
logical surveying, mining and consulting geology, and is useful for those 
who will in any way be connected with the discovery or the development of 
the mineral resources of the country. It forms a good postgraduate course 
for the mining engineer who wishes to understand thoroughly the grotmd- 
work of his profession. Since a knowledge of chemistry is essential for 
proper comprehension of many mineralogical and geological phenomena, 
considerable stress is laid on this science in the earlier part of the course. 
The departments of mineralogy and geology are furnished with well equip- 
ped laboratories for the physical and chemical examination of minerals, 
rocks and ores, and also with collections of illustrative material. Miller Hall, 
a very fine building in memory of the late W. G. Miller, was completed in 
1931 and has a large museum on the main floor with fine specimens of 
minerals and fossils. Although field excursions are made during the session, 
students are advised to spend the summer vacations in practical field work. 


49 


First and Second Years 
See Page 44. 

Third Year 



Lect. Hrs. 

Lab. Hrs. 



per week. 

per week 

Page. 

Surveying Field Work 

2 weeks 

course 

106 

Quantitative Chemistry 1. (3)* 

1 

3 

75 

Physical Chemistry I. (14)* 

2 

3 

76 

Mineralogy III. (10a)* * 

2a 

2a 

85 

Mineralogy II. (10b)* 

2b 

2b 

85 

Mineralogy IV. (11)* 

2 

2 

86 

Geology II. (11)* 

2 

2 

80 

Geology III. (10b)* 

21d 

2b 

80 

Geology VII. (14b)* 

0 

2b 

81 

Geolog V X 

0 

4 

82 

Ore Dressing 

la, 2b 

0 

90 

Piology XVa 

2a 

0 

62 

Y ^ ... . 

12a 

16a Total 28a 

’ . _ - - 

13b 

20b Total 33b 

Fourth Year 




i 

Lect. Hrs. 

Lab. Hrs. 



per week. 

per week 

Page. 

Mineralogy V. (12)* 

2 

2 

86 

Mineralogy VI. (14b)* 

0 

3b 

87 

Geology V. 

1 

0 

81 

Geology VI. (13)* 

o 

0 

81 

Geology VIII. (15)* 

2 

0 

81 

Reports 

0 

4 

83 

Geology XII. (14a)* 

2a 

0 

82 

Mining IV 

1 

0 

89 

Fire Assaying 

lb 

3b 

94 

Ore Dressing (For Session 1939-40 only) .... 

la, 2b 

0 

90 

Economics I 

3 

0 

62 

German A 

3 

0 

61 

Research and Thesis 

0 

6 

87 


17a 

12a Total 29a 


17b 

18b 

rotal 35b 

Graduates in Course A or Course C who 

wish to take further 

work in 

Geology and Mineralogy are referred to the 

graduate < 

courses in 

Geology, 


p. 59, and in Mineralogy, p. 87. 

*Tlie No. of the same course given in tlie Arts Faculty. 


L 


50 


D— CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Chemical Engineering is the application of the fundamental principles of 
Physics, Chemistry, Engineering, and Physical Chemistry, to the construction 
and operation of Chemical plant. The course must therefore be a broad one 
and avoid too narrow a specialization. Graduates have been foimd to enter 
the most diverse industries. 

The first two years are the same as those for the Mining, Metallurgy and 
Chemistry students. Specialization begins in the third year, more time being 
devoted to Chemistry, whilst continuing fundamental courses in mechanical, 
civil and electrical engineering. Specialization is continued in the fourth year, 
with additional training in Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and 
Applied Thermodynamics. 

The course aims at training students for research and operating positions 
in chemical and allied industries. 

Visits are paid to local chemical works and to a number of the largest 
chemical plants outside of Kingston, attendance being compulsory. The 
expense of the outside trip in the fourth year does not exceed twenty-five 
dollars. 

First and Second Years 
See Page 44. 


Third Year 

Chemical Engineering D. 



Lect. Hrs. 

Lab. Hrs. 


per week. 

per week. Page. 

Quantitative Chemistry I. (3)* 

1 

3 

75 

Physical Chemistry I. (14)* 

2 

3 

76 

Industrial Chemistry II. (17)* 

3a, lb 

3a, 2b 

95 

Chemical Engineering I 

2b 

0 

95 

Organic Chemistry I. (12)* 

2 

3 

73 

Thermodynamics I 

1 

0 

113 

General Engineering III 

0 

2 

99 

General Engineering V 

1 

3 

100 

Electrical Engineering I 


2 

106 

Mechanical Engineering XII 

1 

0 

113 

Mechanical Engineering III 

0 

3b 

110 


13a 

19a 

Total 32a 


13b 

21b 

Total 34b 


51 


Fourth Year 


Chemical Engineering D. 



Lect. Hrs. 

Lab. Hrs. 



per week. 

per week. 

Page, 

Physical Chemistry II. (25)* 

2 

3 

76 

Colloid Chemistry la. (15a)* 


2a 

78 

Chemical Engineering II 

2 

3 

96 

Chemical Engineering III 

la, 2b 

5a, 6b 

96 

Chemical Engineering IV 

2 

0 

97 

Thermodynamics III 

2 

3a 

113 

Mechanical Engineering IV 

2 

0 

111 

Hydraulic Engineering IV 

2 

0 

102 

Shop Work 

0 

3b 

115 

Economics I 

3 

0 

62 


17a 

16a Total 33a 


17b 

15b Total 32b 


*Thc No. of the same course given in the Arts Faculty. 

M— METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING 

Metallurgy is divided into chemical metallurgy, the extraction of the 
metals from their ores and the refining of the metals, and physical metallurgy, 
the use of the metals and their alloys in the industries. The former requires 
in students a grounding in inorganic chemistry and its application in metal- 
lurgical processes; the latter, a grounding in physics and its application in 
the study of the constitution of alloys and their physical changes. 

The first two years of the course are the same as those in Mining 
Engineering, Chemical Engineering and Chemistry. The engineering aspect 
of metallurgical work is to the fore in these preparatory years, and is kept 
in view during the third and fourth years. 

In the third year specialization begins and particular stress is placed on 
inorganic and physical chemistry and chemical metallurgy. In the fourth 
year these are continued, while a foundation is laid in physical metallurgy in 
lecture room and well equipped laboratories. 

As far as industrial conditions permit, students are required to work in 
mills or smelters during their summer vacations. For graduation an essay 
on some phase of this practical experience is demanded. 


52 


First and Sec©nd Years 
See Page 44. 


Third Year 



Lect Hrs. 

Lab. 

Hrs. 


per week. 

per 

week. Page 

Quantitative Analysis I. (3)* 

1 

3 

75 

Physical Chemistry I. (14)* 

2 

3 

76 

Organic Chemistry V 

1 

0 

74 

1 hermodynamics T 

1 

0 

113 

Mineralogy Vila 

2a 

0 

87 

General Engineering III 

0 

2 

99 

General Engineering V 

1 

3 

100 

Electrical Engineering I 

2 

2 

106 

Mechanical Engineerinc: XII 

1 

0 

113 

Mechanical Engineering III 

0 

3b 

110 

Metallurgy II 

2 

0 

92 

Metallurgy III 

0 

2 

92 

Ore Dressing 

la, 2b 

0 

90 

Fire Assaying 

la 

3a 

94 


ISa 

18a 

Total 33a 


13b 

18b 

Total 31b 

Fourth YYar 


Lect. Hrs. 

Lab. 

Hrs. 


per week. 

per 

week. Page 

Physical Chemistry II. (25)* 

2 

3 

76 

Metallurgy IV 

3 

0 

92 

Mining IV 

1 

0 

89 

Metallurgy V 

0 

1 

92 

Metallurgy VI 

lb 

0 

92 

Metallurgy VII 

0 

2 

93 

Metallurgy Lab 

0 

3 

93 

Metallography 

1 

3 

93 

Hydraulic Engineering IV 

2 

0 

103 

Milling 

0 

9 

90 

Economics 

3 

0 

63 

Summer Essay 



94 

Mineralogy VIb, (b) optional 

lb 

3b 

87 


12a 

21a 

Total 33a 

’^Tlie No. of the same course given in the Arts 

13b 

Faculty. 

21b 

Total 34b 


53 


E.— CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

The various branches of Civil Engineering — namely, Surveying, Struc- 
tural Engineering, Municipal Engineering and Hydraulic Engineering, receive 
full consideration. During the earlier years of the course a sound training 
is given in Mathematics, Physics, Mechanics and other allied subjects, which 
are essential to the proper education of an engineer. In Surveying the 
student is made familiar with the various instruments and with the ordinary 
operations of Surveying practice. In Structural Engineering design and 
construction in masonry, concrete and steel is covered. In the testing 
laboratories materials of construction are tested. In Municipal Engineering 
— lectures on Highway work, and in Sanitary Engineering, in the fields of 
water-supply and sewage are given. Laboratory work in these fields enhances 
the value of the lecture work. In Hydraulic Engineering the design and 
construction of dams, power plants, and hydraulic structures is covered. The 
Laboratory work covers flow in closed and open conduits, pressures, flow 
of air, aerodynamics and allied problems. 


First and Second Years 

See Pages 44 and 45. 


Third Year 



Lect. Hrs. 

Lab. Hrs. 


per week. 

per week Page. 

Surveying Field Work 


106 

Metallurgy I 

1 

0 

91 

Thermodynamics I 

1 

0 

113 

General Engineering II 

2 

0 

99 

General Engineering III 

0 

2 

99 

General Engineering VI 

1 

3 

100 

Structural Engineering I 

1 

3 

100 

Hydraulic Engineering I 

2 

0 

101 

Surveying III 


3a 

105 

Municipal Engineering I 

2b 

3b 

103 

Railway Engineering I 

2 

3 

102 

Electrical Engineering I 

2 

2 

106 

Geology IX 

7 

0 

82 


15a 

16a 

Total 31a 


16b 

16b 

Total 32b 


54 


Fourth Year 



Lect. Hrs. 

Lab. Hrs. 



per week. 

per week. 

Page. 

Industrial Chemistry I 


0 

94 

General Engineering IV 

0 

3a 

99 

Municipal Engineering II 

1 

0 

103 

Municipal Engineering III 

1 

3b 

103 

Highway Engineering I 

1 

3a 

104 

Structural Engineering II 

2 

5a, 6b 

101 

Structural Engineering IV 


5 

101 

Mechanical Engineering IV 

2 

0 

111 

Hydraulic Engineering II 

2 

0 

102 

Hydraulic Engineering III 

0 

3b 

102 

Economics I 


0 

62 

Engineering Economics 

1 

0 

103 


— 

— 

— 


15a 

16a Total 31a 

F.— MECHANICAL 

15b 

ENGINEERING. 

17b Total 32b 


Mechanical Engineering embraces the design, manufacture and operation 
of all classes of machinery, of power plants and manufacturing plants, as well 
as the executive management of industries. A four years’ course must there- 
fore be broad enough to give the student a thorough training in the funda- 
mental principles, and not merely provide training for one of the many special 
branches of the profession. 

The first two years are devoted to the study of the fundamental sub- 
jects of Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Mechanics, including experi- 
mental work in the various laboratories. Special attention is given to the 
strength of materials, with practice in testing during the second and third 
years. The study of the steam engine and of other forms of heat-engines 
includes courses in Thermodynamics, Valve Gears, Governors and the 
Balancing of Engines. Instruction is given in Mechanism, Machine Design, 
Shop Work, and the fundamental principles of Electrical Engineering. 
Instruction in drawing extends over the four years, and gives a thorough 
drill in modern drafting-room practice. In the more advanced courses 
of the fourth year the student is taught how to apply the general 
principles to the design and operation of special machinery, steam and gas 
engines, steam boilers and gas producers, and complete power plants ; 
each student is allowed to specialize as far as is practicable. The instruction 
in the laboratories is intended not only to familiarize the student with stand- 
ard methods of testing, but also to teach him how to attack original problems. 


55 


The fourth year students are kept in touch with manufacturing works 
in order to familiarize them with the practice of modern power plants and 
shops. 


First and Second Years 
See Pages 44 and 45. 


Third Year 


Lect. Hrs. Lab. Hrs. 

per week. per week. Page. 


Mathematics VI 

Thermodynamics I 

Thermodynamics V 

General Engineering III. . . 
General Engineering V. ... 
Electrical Engineering IV. . 

Metallurgy I 

Mechanical Engineering I. . 
Mechanical Engineering II. 
Mechanical Engineering III. 

Shop Work 

Hydraulic Engineering I. . 


Fourth Year 


Thermodynamics III 

Thermodynamics IV 

Electrical Engineering VII. . 
Mechanical Engineering V. . . 
Mechanical Engineering VI. . 
Mechanical Engineering VIII, 
Mechanical Engineering XL 
Hydraulic Engineering II. . . 
Hydraulic Engineering III. . . 

Metallurgy VIII 

Economics I 


2a 

0 

64 

1 

0 

113 

2 

2 

114 

0 

2 

99 

1 

3 

100 

2 

2 

107 

1 

0 

91 

2 

0 

109 

3b 

0 

110 

0 

6 

110 

0 

3 

115 

2 

0 

101 

— 

— 

— 

13 a 

18a 

Total 31a 

14b 

18b 

Total 32b 


2 

3a 


113 

0 

5 


114 

2 

2 


108 

3 

6a, 3b 


111 

2a, lb 

0 


112 

0 

6b 


112 

1 

0 


113 

2 

0 


102 

0 

3b 


102 

0 

2a 


93 

3 

0 


62 

15a 

18a 

Total 

33a 

14b 

19b 

Total 

33b 


56 


G.— ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

The instruction in the first two years of the course in Electrical 
Engineering provides for a thorough training in the fundamental 
subjects of Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Mechanics, including suit- 
able work in the various laboratories. Part of the time is devoted to 
elementary drawing and shop work. In the third year the work consists of 
an introduction to the general principles underlying all electrical work to- 
gether with elementary laboratory work. Considerable time is devoted to 
the study of Thermodynamics together with more advanced Mathematics 
and Physics. The fourth year is devoted to the study of the theory and 
action of the main types of electrical apparatus, the design and operation 
of central stations, electric lighting, electric railways and power transmission 
together with a thorough grounding in the principles underlying the electron 
lube. 

An important part of the course consists in solving problems such as 
are frequently met with in practical work. In this way the student is trained 
in the application of theory to the solution of practical problems. 

Arrangements are made for occasional visits to electrical works. 

The whole course is designed to give the student a thorough under- 
standing of the general principles which constitute the basis of all electrical 
work, together with some knowledge of their practical application. No effort 
is made to give that intimate knowledge of practical details which experience 
alone can supply. 

Students are advised not to enter Course G unless they have taken a high 
standing in Physics III., Physics IV., and Mathematics V. 

First and Second Years 
See Pages 44 and 45. 

Third Year 



Lect. Hrs. 

Lab. Hrs. 



per week. 

per week. 

Page. 

Mathematics VII 

2 

0 

65 

♦Physics V 

1 

3 

68 

Thermodynamics I 

1 

0 

113 

General Engineering III 

0 

2 

99 

♦Electrical Engineering II 

2 

3 

107 

♦Electrical Engineering III 

3 

3 

107 

Electrical Engineering VI 

2b 

P 

108 

Mechanical Engineering I 

2 

0 

109 

Mechanical Engineering II 

3b 

0 

110 

Mechanical Engineering VII 

0 

3 

112 

Metallurgy I 

1 

0 

91 

Hydraulic Engineering I 

2 

0 

101 


14a 

14a Total 28a 


19b 

14b Total 33b 


♦Students must pass these subjects before entering the fourth year. 


57 


Fourth Year 



Lect. Hrs. 

Lab. Hrs. 


- 

per week. 

per week 

Pag-. 

Electrical Engineering V 

4 

6 

107 

Electrical Engineering VIII 

1 

3 

108 

Electrical Engineering X 

1 

3 

108 

Electrical Engineering XII 

2 

3 

108 

Hydraulic Engineering II 

2 

0 

102 

Hydraulic Engineering HI 

0 

3a 

102 

Mechanical Engineering IV 

2 

0 

111 

Metallurgy VI 

lb 

0 

92 

Economics I 

3 

0 

62 


15a 

18a 

Total 33a 


16b 

15b 

Total 31b 


H.— PHYSICS 

This course is desigaed to fit men for positions as physicists in research 
laboratories and industries. 

The importance of a thorough grounding in the fundamental subjects 
of Physics, Mathematics, and Chemistry, cannot be over-emphasized, so these 
subjects form the major part of the course. The engineer’s point of view is 
acquired from the classes of the Faculty of Applied Science, while the breadth 
of view necessary for a research worker is gained from the advanced 
theoretical classes in the major subjects of the course. Students intending 
to take this course are urged to acquire a reading knowledge of French 
and German as early in the course as possible. 


First Year 
See Page 44. 


Second Year 

The Second Year of Any Course 


See Pages 44 and 45. 


58 


Thied Year 



Lect. Hrs. 
per week. 

Lab. Hrs. 
per week. 

Page 

Mathematics VI 

2a 

0 


64 

Mathematics XI. (16b)* 

3b 

0 


65 

Physics V 

1 

3 


68 

Physics VI. (10b)* 

3b 

2b 


69 

Physics VII. (14a & 13b)* . 

3a, 2b 

2a, 4 b 

69 

Electrical Engineering II 

2 

3 


107 

Electrical Engineering VI. . . 

2b 

0 


108 

German A 

3 

0 


61 


11a 

8a 

Total 

1 19 a 


16b 

12b 

Total 28b 

Mathematics X. (15b)* 

Fourth Year 
3b 

0 


65 

Physics IX. (16a & 20b)* .. 

3 

0 


69 

Physics X. (17b)* 


3b 


70 

Physics XIII 

0 

6 


70 

Electrical Engineering VIII. . 

1 

3 


108 

Electrical Engineering XII. . . 

2 

3 


108 

Scientific German or French 

2 

0 


62 

Economics I 

-3 

0 


62 


14a 

12a 

Total 26a 


16b 

15b 

Total 31b 


’’The No. of the same course given in the Arts Faculty. 


GRADUATE COURSE IN COMMERCE 

The demand for engineers with business training has led to the estab- 
lishment of a year’s course in Commerce for graduates in Engineering of 
Queen’s and other Universities. 

The purpose of this course is to aid in preparing men who already have 
the technical equipment for work in the administrative or financial branches 
of industry. 

A certificate will be awarded to students successfully completing the 
course. 

Students who have not had an elementary course in Economics should 
read in preparation Clay, Economics for the General Reader, or McGibbon, 
Elementary Economics for the Canadian Reader. 


59 


The year’s work will consist of five full courses or their equivalent, as 
follows : 

1. Accounting and Statistics. 

2. Business Finance. 

3. Principles of Marketing or Money, Banking and International 

Trade. 

4. Two half courses to be selected (e.g. Commercial Law, Invest- 

ments, Cost Accounting, Transportation, Labour Problems). 

5. A Thesis (Commerce 59). 

For more detailed description of courses, see the Announcement of the 
Courses in Commerce and Administration. 

GRADUATE COURSE IN GEOLOGY 

The establishment of the Miller Memorial Research Chair in Geology has 
made it possible to give a year’s graduate work in Geology. 

The courses are planned to give to those men who have graduated in 
Mining Engineering, Geology option, the additional training in Geology that is 
needed for those who^ intend to undertake exploration and development work. 

For those who intend to make Geology their profession a year’s work 
satisfactorily completed at Queen’s is equivalent to a year’s graduate work at 
other universities and is accepted as such at some of the important graduate 
schools in Geology. It has the advantage of giving to graduates who intend 
to practice their profession in Canada an opportunity to study Canadian local- 
ities and problems in more detail than is otherwise possible since the collections 
of material from the important mineral deposits of the Canadian shield are 
large and fairly complete, and there is also in the vicinity of Kingston the 
opportunity for field study of the Pre-Cambrian rocks occurring. 

Graduates in courses A, Geology option, and C in the Faculty of Applied 
Science at Queen’s University and graduates in equivalent courses of other 
universities may proceed to the M.Sc. degree. (See p. 42). The courses are 
open only to graduates. 

For outline of courses see page 83. 

COURSE FOR B.A. LEADING TO THE DEGREES OF B.A. AND B.Sc. 

IN SIX YEARS 

Students taking these courses are required to have Arts Matriculation 
and to register for the first two years in Arts alone and pay the class and 
registration fees in Arts; to register for the second two years in both Arts and 
Applied Science, to pay both registration fees, with examination fees as 
required, and the Applied Science class fees ; and to register the last two 
years in Applied Science only, paying the registration and class fees. Arts 
classes are subject to the regulations in the Arts Calendar, and Applied 
Science classes to the regulations in the Science Calendar. 


60 


The courses toi B.A. and B.Sc. must be taken as laid down in the fol- 
lowing scheme. The regulations regarding back classes on page 34 will be 


applied on these courses. 

First Year 

1. English 1. 

2. French 1 or German 1. 

3. Mathematics 1. 

4. Mathematics IV. (Science). 
.5.*Physics 1. 

6.*General Chemistry 1. 


Second Year 

1. English 2. 

2. French 2 or German 2; or Latin, 

Greek, or Spanish. 

3. Philosophy 1 or 2. 

4. 5. Two of History 1, 3, Economics 4, 

Politics 2. 


Third Year 

1. Course from Group I. 

2. Course in a subject previously taken but not covered by the later courses 

in Science. 

3. Mathematics I, II., and III. 

4. Surveying I. 

5. Drawing I. 

6. Projection I. 

The degree of B. A. will be conferred on candidates who complete four 
years’ work with a minimum standing of fifty per cent, and sixty-two per 
cent, in half their classes. 


Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Years. 

The fourth, fifth, and sixth years are the same as the second, third, and 
fourth years of the B.Sc. Courses. 

If a student on one of these courses wishes to specialize in one or more 
of the Arts subjects, he may do so in the honour classes. 

Attention is called to the fact that by proper selection of classes an entire 
Arts course leading to the degree M.A. and a B.Sc. course in the Faculty of 
Applied Science can be completed in seven years. 

^Students registering on the combined B.A., B.Sc. Course who are eligible 
for allowance on IPpper School certificates will be granted standing in Physics 
and Chemistry subject to the following regulations : 

(a) If theif\ standing on Honour Matriculation is Class I they may pro- 
ceed without conditions. 

(b) If their standing on Honour Matriculation is Class H they must pass 
the final examination in the corresponding course at the University, and unless 
they can present evidence of having satisfactorily completed laboratory tvork in 
connection with the course they must repeat the laboratory work at the Univer- 
sity in whole or part as the department concerned may decide. 

(c) If their standing on Honour Matriculation is Class HI or Credit they 
must repeat in full the corresponding course at the University. 


61 


SUBJECTS OF STUDY 


ENGLISH 

Lecturers — C. J. Vincent, A.M., Ph.D. 

W. Angus, A.M., Ph.D. 

First Year English 

This course consists of the writing of weekly compositions and the study 
of prescribed works by the following authors : Hardy, Huxley, Butler, Conrad, 
Hudson, Wells, Galsworthy, Shaw, Maugham, etc. 

Foerster and Steadman, Writing and Thinking, (Boston: Houghton 
M i ff 1 in Compan y ) . 

Lectures — Sections 1-4. Monday and Wednesday 8-9. 

Sections 5-8, Monday and Wednesday 1-2. 


GERMAN 

Professor — Heinrich Henel, Ph.D. 

Lecturer — S. M. Gilmour, Ph.D. 

german a. — PREPARATORY COURSE. 

For third year students in Courses B. and H. and fourth year students 
in Course C. 

This course is intended to meet the needs of students who enter the 
University with little or no knowledge of German. It is taken by students 
who need it to complete their Matriculation, or who desire to pursue a course 
in which German text-books or works of reference are prescribed or recom- 
mended. The requirements correspond in a general way to those for Junior 
Matriculation. The course will count towards a degree. 

Text-books : 

Fotos & Bray — German Grammar for Chemists and Other Science Students 
(Wiley). 

Fiedler & Sandbach — A First Gcrinan Course for Science Studcjils — (Oxford). 
Nock — An Introduction to Scientific German — (MacMillan). 

Lectures — Mondgy, Wednesday and Friday at 4. 


Dr. Gilmour. 


62 


SCIENTIFIC GERMAN 

For fourth year students in Courses B. and H. or any Science students. 

This course is designed for students who are doing advanced work in 
chemistry, physics, geology and mineralogy. The work consists of a more 
advanced study of German grammar and syntax, and reading of scientific 
texts selected to suit members of the class. Prerequisite: German A, or 
Matriculation in German. 

Text-books : 

Curts — Einfiihning in die Chcmic. (Holt). 

Curts — Readings in Scientific and Technical German. (Holt). 

Scientific Journals bearing on each student’s special field. 

Students are advised to purchase also : 

Patterson, German-English Dictionary for Chemists. (Wiley.) 

Lectures — Tuesday and Thursday at 9. 

Dr. Gilmour. 

FRENCH 

French I. 

For prescription, hours and instructors, see the Arts Calendar. 


ECONOMICS 

Professor of Commerce — C. E. Walker, B.Sc. (Acc.), C.A. 

Economics I. 

Required of Fourth Year Students in all courses. 

A study of the economic and business problems of the engineer with 
regard to the organization, financing and management of engineering enter- 
prises. The course includes a discussion of the law pertaining to general 
contracts, agency and the sale of goods. Attention is also given to the 
nature and purpose of accounting and cost records. The results shown 
by these records are analysed and interpreted to show the extent to which 
they may be used as an aid to management. 

Some of the general principles of industrial management also are dis- 
cussed, the discussion being under the direction of Mr. J. C. Cameron, Head 
•of the Department of Industrial Relations. 

Assigned Readings. 

Lectures — Monday and W cd^nesday at 9. Thursday at 8. 


BIOLOGY 

Associate Professor — John Stanley, M.A., Ph.D. 

BIOLOGY xva — general zoology 
For third year students in course C, first term. 

Lectures on the classification, comparative anatomy, physiology, develop- 
ment, evolution, distribution and economic importance of animals from the 
Protozoa to the Insects. Students taking Geology may make arrangements 
to obtain information regarding groups of animals of interest to a Geologist 
or a Paleontologist. 

Text Book — Hegner, College Zoology, 4th. ed. (MacMillan) 

Lectures — Tuesday and Thursday at 10, first term. 


Professor Stanley. 


63 


MATHEMATICS. 

Professor — J. Matheson, M.A. 

Professor — C. F. Gummer, M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor — N. Miller, M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor — K. P. Johnston, B.A., B.Sc. 

Assistant Professor — G. L. Edgett, M.A., Ph.D. 

Lecturers — J. O. Watts, M.A,, J. D. Stewart, M.A. 

An essential part of the student’s training in all courses in Mathematics 
is the training in accurate computation. He should cultivate the habit of care 
and accuracy in all his numerical work. 

MATHEMATICS I 

For first year students in all courses. 

Trigonometry, to cover spherical trigonometry and a review of the more 
important parts of plane trigonometry. 

Sections 1-4, Tuesday and Thursday 2-3. 

Sections 5-8, Tuesday and Thursday 9-10. 

Mr. Watts and Mr. Stewart. 

MATHEMATICS II 

For first year students in all courses. 

Calculus. A course covering differentiation and the simpler methods 
of integration with applications to rates, maxima and minima and the finding 
of areas, volumes, surfaces, fluid pressure, centres of gravity, moments of 
inertia, etc. 

Text Book — Phillips, Calculus (John Wiley & Sons). 

Sections 1-4, Tuesday and Thursday 1-2. 

Sections 5-8, Tuesday and Thursday 10-11. 

Professor Miller, Mr. Watts, and Mr. Stewart. 

MATHEMATICS III 

For first year students in all courses. 

Analytic Geometry, A review of the geometry of the straight line 
and circle, and a study of the conics and other plane curves of importance 
in engineering. 

Text Book — Tanner and Allen, Brief Course in Analytic Geometry, 
(American Book Company). 

Sections 1-2, Wednesday 10-11, Friday 8-9. 

Sections 3-4, Monday 3-4, Wednesday 10-11. 

Sections 5-8, Wednesday 3-4, Friday 1-2. 

Professor Gummer, and Mr. Stewart. 


64 


MATHEMATICS IV. 

For first year students in all courses. 

Synthetic Solid Geometry, covering the properties of the principal 
solid figures, methods and formulae for areas and volumes, etc. 

Astronomy, including the fundamental principles of the subject, such as 
the systems of co-ordinates, planetary motion, time, the use of the Nautical 
Almanac. 

Sections 1-4, Monday and Friday 10-11. 

Sections 5-8, Monday and Friday 3-4. 

Professor Johnston and Professor Edgett. 

MATHEMATICS V. 

For second year students in all courses. 

Calculus and Algebra. This course continues the Calculus of Mathema- 
tics II., and covers certain important parts of Algebra. It includes such topics 
as curvature, convergence of series, Taylor’s series with applications, deter- 
minants, partial fractions, solution of numerical equations, integration of 
more difficult forms with applications and simple differential equations. 

Text Book: — Phillips, Calculus (John Wiley and Sons). 

A.B.C.D.M. Sections 1 and 2 — Monday and Friday 10-11, Wednesday 1-2. 

A.B.C.D.M. Sections 3 and 4 — Monday, Wednesday and Friday 11-12. 

E.F.G. — Monday, Wednesday and Friday 11-12. 

Professor Johnston, Professor Edgett, and Mr. Watts. 

MATHEMATICS VI. 

For third year students in courses F. and H. 

A continuation of Mathematics V to cover certain topics in analytic solid 
geometry and in addition, partial differentiation, maxima and minima for 
functions of several variables, double and triple integration and simple differ- 
ential equations with applications. 

Text Book: Phillips, Calculus (John Wiley and Sons). 

Wednesday and Friday^ 10-11, first term. 


Professor Miller. 


65 


MATHEMATICS VII. 

For third year students in course G. 

Mathematics VI and a continuation to include such topics as hyperbolic 
functions, the catenary, a more detailed study of differential equations, intro- 
duction to Fourier series and the use of the complex variable. 

Text Book: — Miller, First Course in Differential Equations (Oxford 
University Press). 

Wednesday and Friday, 10-11. 

Professor Miller. 


MATHEMATICS X. 

For fourth year students in course H. 

A course in Analytic Solid Geometry involving a study of various solid 
figures and of the general properties of surfaces. Introduction to Differential 
Geometry. 

Text Book: Snyder and Sisam, Analytical Geometry of Space (Holt). 
Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 8-9, second term. 

Professor Gummer. 


MATHEMATICS XI. 

For third year students in course H. 

A course in Differential Equations to include the more important 
methods of solution of ordinary differential equations, and a brief intro- 
duction to partial differential equations. 

Text Book: Miller, First Course in Differential Equations (Oxford 
University Press). 

Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, 8-9, second term. 

Professor Miller. 


ASTRONOMY II. 

For second year students in courses E. F. and G. 

Applications of Spherical Trigonometry to Geodesy and Astronomy. The 
method of least squares. 


Saturday, 11-12. 


Professor Johnston. 


66 


PHYSICS 

Professor — A. L. Clark, B.Sc., Ph.D., F.R.S.C 

The Chown Research Professor — J. A. Gray, B.Sc., D.Sc., O.B.E., 
F.R.S., F.R.S.C. 

The Robert Waddell Professor of Experimental Physics — J. K. 
Robertson, M.A., F.R.S.C. 

Professor — E. Flammer, B.Sc., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professors — H. M. Cave, M.A., Ph.D.; 

B. W. Sargent, M.A., Ph.D.; E. E. Watson, M.Sc., Ph.D.; H. W. 
Darkness, M.Sc., M.A., Ph.D. 

Demonstrators — J. E. Kennedy, B.A. ; C. M. Cross, B.A. 

The work in Physics is carried on in lecture and laboratory courses which 
run parallel to each other. In the lecture room the fundamental principles arc 
developed and applied, experimental demonstrations given and many prob- 
lems solved. In all classes in Physics weekly exercises are required of stu- 
dents. In the laboratory a large number of experiments are perform- 
ed. These are designed to train the student in manipulation of apparatus and 
mstruments of precision, to teach him to make accurate measurements and to 
give practice in properly recording, interpreting and reducing experimental 
data. 

In all the courses in Physics, the work in the laboratories will be counted 
as a certain percentage of the whole work of the session. In estimating the 
standing in the laboratory work, both the quantity and quality of the work 
done will be considered. 

Physics 1. and II., together forming a complete introductory course, are 
taken by all first year students. Previous knowledge, though valuable, is not 
required. The laboratory work of this year is arranged to supplement the 
lectures in both Physics I. and II., and credit for this work is given on the 
written papers in both subjects. Students in both classes have opportunity 
for assistance by Douglas Tutors. (See page 33). 

PHYSICS I. 

Recuired of all first year students. 

The subjects dealt with include the elementary treatment of uniformly 
accelerated motion, Newton’s Laws and their application as the basis of 
Mechanics, Vector addition applied to simple cases of forces, velocities, mo- 
menta, etc.. Work, Power, Moments, Simple cases of Centre of Mass and of 
Equilibrium, the application cf mechanical ideas to the elementary statics of 
liquids and gases. 

Lectures — Sections 1-4, Monday 11-12, Thursday 3-4. 

— Sections 5-8, Monday 4-5, Thursday 8-9. 

Professor Watson and Dr. Darkness. 


67 


PHYSICS ir. 

Reijuired of all first year students. 

A course of lectures of two hours per week on Magnetism, Electricity, 
Wave Motion, Sound, Light and Heat. These topics are discussed mathema- 
tically and illustrated by experiments. 

Lectures — Sections 1-4, Wednesday and Friday at 11. 

Sections 5-8, Wednesday 4-5, Friday 2-3. 

Professors Robertson and Cave. 

Laboratory — Section 1, Monday, 1-3, Section 2, Monday, 3-5. 

Section 3, Thursday 8-10, Section 4, Thursday 10-12. 

Section 5, Monday 8-10, Section 6, Monday 10-12. 

Section 7, Thursday 1-3, Section 8, Thursday 3-5. 

PHYSICS III. 

This class required of students in the second year in courses E. F. G. 

This course of lectures is a continuation of Physics 1. Mathematics 
V is taken at the same time as this class, consequently during the latter 
part of the year the Calculus is used freely. A general review of the import- 
ant fundamental principles of Physics occupies the first few weeks. These 
are then applied to problems dealing with Motion in a Circle, Simple Harmonic 
Motion, Composition of Simple Harmonic Motions with applications, 
Moments of Inertia, Rotation, Friction of Belts, Pivots and Bearings, 
Oscillations, Centre of Percussion, Elasticity in Stretching, Bending and 
Twisting, Energy and its Transformations. 

The laboratory work, which runs parallel with the lectures, is a con- 
tinuation of the work of the first year. 

Lectures — Monday and Friday, 9-10. 

Professor Harkness. 

Laboratory — Sects. 1, 2, 3, Friday, 1-3 (a), Thursday, 3-5 (b) ; Sects. 
4, 5, 6, Wednesday, 1-3 (a), Thursday, 1-3 (b). 

Professors Sargent, Watson and Harkness. 

PHYSICS IV. 

This class which is required of students in the second year in Courses 
E, F, G, consists of (a) two lectures per week, (b) a laboratory course of 
two hours per week. 

In the lectures, fundamental electrical ideas are discussed, with special 
emphasis on quantitative relations. Problems are assigned weekly dealing 
with basic ideas of Electrostatics, Magnetism, Electromagnetism, Electro- 
dynamics, Electromagnetic Induction, and Alternating Currents. 

The laboratory course includes a series of experiments designed to train 
the student in standard electrical measurements, as well as to illustrate work 
discussed in lectures. 

Lectures — Wednesday, 9-10, Friday, 8-9. Professor Watson. 

Laboratory — Sects. 1, 2, 3, Thursday, 3-5 (a) ; Sects. 4, 5, 6, Thursday, 
1-3 (a) ; Sects. 1-2, Monday, 3-5 (b) ; Sects. 3-4, Saturday, 
8-10 (b) ; Sects. 5-6, Friday, 1-3 (b). 

Professors Sargent, Watson and Harkness. 


68 


PHYSICS XIV. 

This class is required of students in the second year in courses A.B.C.D.M. 
There are three lectures per -week in the first term and two in the second, 
four laboratory hours in the first term and two in the second. 

The work comprises nearly all of the work of Physics III and parts of 
Physics IV. Approximately two-thirds of the time is given to Mechanics 
and one-third to Electricity and Magnetism. 

Lectures — Secs. 1 and 2, Tuesday 8-9, Thursday 10-11; and Saturday 8-9 
first term. 

Secs. 3 and 4, Tuesday 10-11, Thursday 8-9, and Monday 10-11 
first term. 

Professors Flammer, Sargent, and Harkness. 

Laboratory — Secs. 1, 2, Monday 3-5 (first term) ; Tuesday 3-5. 

Secs. 3, 4, Monday 1-3 (first term) ; Tuesday 1-3. 

Professors Sargent, Cave, and Harkness. 

PHYSICS V. 

Required of students in third year of Courses G. and H. 

The work of this class comprises a course of lectures on the Elementary, 
Mathematical Theory of Electricity and Magnetism, and a course of labora- 
tory experiments in advanced electrical measurement. 

In the lectures are treated such topics as the more important laws and 
theories in Electrostatics, the laws of the Magnetic Field, Electrodynamics 
and Electromagnetic Induction. At each lecture problems are assigned for 
solution and these are later discussed in class. 

In the laboratory the students make detailed study of several groups of 
experiments. These comprise careful study of galvanometers using both 
steady and transient currents, measurements of capacities, permeability, 
insulation resistance, and self and mutual induction, the use of the poten- 
tiometer in measurement of electro-motive force of cells, calibration of 
voltmeters and ammeters, and study of electrical waves and discharge 
phenomena. 

Lecture — Thursday, 9-10, first term. 

Thursday 4-5, second term. 

Laboratory — Wednesday, 1-4. 


I 


Professor Flammer. 


69 


PHYSICS VI. 

Elementary Theoretical Mechanics. 

Required of students in third year of Course H, 

This course consists of a series of lectures in which the elements of 
Statics and Dynamics of a Particle are discussed. 

Lectures — Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, 10-11, second term. 

Laboratory — Monday, 1-3, second term. 

Professors Flammer and Watson. 

PHYSICS VII. 

Required of students in third year of Course H. 

HEAT. This part of the course is an introduction to Thermodynamics, 
beginning with a detailed discussion of the isothermal and the basis of 
thermometry and continuing with the development of the laws of Thermo- 
dynamics and a discussion of entropy, its properties and applications. 

ELECTRICITY. The general aim of this part of the course is to 
acquaint the student with the modern developments in such branches of 
Physics as Radiation, X-rays, Conduction of Electricity through Gases, 
Radioactivity, etc. 

Text Book — Ions, Electrons and Ionising Radiations, by J. A. Crowther. 

Lectures — Monday and Wednesday, 10-11; and Friday, 10-11, first term. 

Laboratory — Thursday, 2-4 (a), 3-5 (b) ; and Monday, 1-3, second term. 

Dean Clark, Professor Gray and Professor Cave. 

PHYSICS IX. 

Required of students in fourth year of Course H. 

MECHANICS OF RIGID AND ELASTIC BODIES. This part of 
the course includes a discussion of such topics as the Motion of a Rigid 
Body, Ellipsoids of Inertia, Motion with Fixed Axis and Fixed Point, 
l^uler’s Equations, and applications to motion of the symmetrical top ; Stress 
and Strain relations in Elastic Bodies, Elastic Constants. 

ELECTRICITY. The lectures in this part of the course are on advanced 
Fdectrodynamics. 

Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 11-12. 

Professor Flammer 


70 


PHYSICS X. 

Required of students in fourth year of Course H. 

KINETIC THEORY OF GASES. This part of the course includes 
the topics of the Maxwellian distribution of velocities, free path phenomena, 
viscosity, thermal conductivity, diffusion. Van der Waal’s equation, and the 
quantum theory as applied to specific heats and to radiation. 

PHYSICAL OPTICS. The lectures in this part of the course are on 
the theory and phenomena of Physical Optics, including a discussion of Wave 
Motion, Diffraction, Interference Spectroscopes, Polarization and Double 
Refraction. 

Text Book — Kinetic Theory of Gases by Bloch. 

Lectures — Tuesday and Thursday, 11-12; and Saturday, 11-12, first term. 

Laboratory — Thursday, 2-5, second term. 

Professors Gray and Robertson. 

PHYSICS XIII. 

Required of fourth year students in Course H. 

An advanced laboratory course of experiments in Optics, Electricity and 
Magnetism and Heat. 

Monday and Fridpy, 1-4. Dean Clark and Professor Robertson. 

PHYSICAL LABORATORIES. 

The Physics Department is located in Ontario Hall, and contains two large lec- 
ture rooms, with seating capacities of 125, and 90 respectively, a small lecture room 
with seating capacity of 60, two small class rooms, three large rooms equipped as 
general elementary laboratories, and another room equipped for advanced 
work, offices for the staff, research rooms, a large, well-lighted library and 
leading room, smaller rooms for special purposes, apparatus and store rooms. 
The equipment for lecture table and laboratory is steadily growing and com- 
prises most of the more important pieces of apparatus for these purposes. 

Research in Physics is being carried on by members of the staff and by 
senior students. It is desired to extend this activity as far as possible. A 
limited number of workers who desire to use the facilities of the laboratory 
may be admitted and assisted. Particulars may be obtained from the 
Professor of Physics. 

LIBRARY 

The library contains text-books, works of reference, and journals devoted 
to Physics and related subjects. These may be freely consulted by the 
student in the reading room between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Books 
may in general be taken from the building overnight upon reporting to a 
member of the staff and making a record in a book provided for that 
purpose. It is only by special permission, however, that any book may be 
kept longer than one night at a time. 


71 


CHEMISTRY. 

Professor of Chemistry — Arthur C. Neish, A.M., Ph.D., F.C.I.C. 
Professor — J. A. McRae, M.A., Ph.D., F.I.C., F.R.S.C. 

Associate Professor — Grenville B. Frost, B.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor — L. A. Munro, M.A., Ph.D., F.C.I.C. 
Assistant Professor — Roy L. Dorrance, M.A., F.C.I.C. 

Lecturer — E. G. Taylor, B.Sc., Sc.M., Ph.D., A.I.C. 

Instructor — J. A. Martin, M.A. 

Arts Research Fellow — B. Van Order, B.A. 

Milton Hersey Fellow — A. Abbott, B.Sc. 

William Neish Fellow — J. A. Pearce, B.A. 

Demonstrators — H. K. Coulthart, B.A. 


A. K. Edwards, B.Sc. 
J. Hanna, B.A. 




Second or 

Research 


First 

Advanced 

Training 


Courses. 

Courses. 

Courses. 

General Chemistry 

I 

II, HI 

IV 

Qualitative Analysis 

I 


— 

Organic Chemistry 

I, V 

H 

IV 

Quantitative Analysis 

I, 11 

— 

IV 

Physical Chemistry 

I 

II, HI 

IV 

Industrial Chemistry 

I, H 

Hla 

IV 

Colloid Chemistry 


H 

IV 


General and Inorganic Chemistry 
General Chemistry I. 

For all first year students in Science. 

This course presupposes a mastery of the contents of matriculation 
chemistry. 

In addition to studying in detail the history, methods of preparation, 
properties and industrial applications of the most important non-metals and 
metals and their compounds, the fundamental theories, laws and principles 
are emphasized. Simple unknowns are also given. 

Texts — Kendall, Smith's Inorganic Chemistry, (Century Co.). 

Properties and Numerical Relationship of the Common Elements 
and Compounds — J. E. Belcher and J. C. Colbert. (Century Co.) 

Lectures — Monday., Wednesday, Friday at 9, or Monday and Wednesday 
at 2 and Friday at 11, in room 310, Gordon Hall. 

Laboratory — Sections 5-8, Tuesday, 1-4, Sections 1-4, Wednesday 1-4 
in 305, 308, 301 Gordon Hall. 


Professor Neish and Assistants. 


72 


General Chemistry li. 

For students in Courses EFG Second Year. 

This lecture course is designed to supplement Chemistry I, including in 
its scope such chemical principles, facts and theories as will find application in 
Civil, Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. Some of the topics dealt with 
are the chemistry of the metals, fundamental chemical theory, the laws ot 
solutions, homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibria, the colloidal state and 
simple organic compounds. These topics are illustrated by lecture experiments 
and problems. 

Texts — Kendall, Smith's College Chemistry, (Century Co.) 

Chapin — ^‘Second Year College Chemistry'’ (Wiley & Sons). 

Lectures — Thursday 8-9, and Saturday 10-11. 

Professor Muiiro. 


General Chemistry III. 

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 

For students in Course B, third year. 

A study of inorganic chemistry based on the modern form of the 
periodic system and the electronic theory of valency. 

Text — To be announced at opening of term. 

Lecture — Tuesday and Thursday, 11-12, first term. 

Monday, 10-11, Thursday, 11-12, second term. 

Dr. Taylor 


General and Inorganic Chemistry IV. 

Research Training. 

For graduate students and students in Course B, fourth year, electing 
thesis option in General and Inorganic Chemistry. 


Professors Neish, Frost and Munro 


73 


Qualitative Analysis. 

Qualitative Analysis I. 

For students in Courses A, B, C, D, M, second year. 

The lectures deal with the theory of analytical chemistry. The modern 
'Concept of the structure of matter is related to analytical behaviour. Ihe 
development and application of the laws of equilibrium and solutions are 
emphasized. 

The laboratory work consists of the systematic analysis of basic and acid 
ions leading to the analysis of alloys, salt mixtures, minerals and various 
.commercial products. 

Texts — Miller, Theory of Qiialitative Analysis, (Century Co.). 

A. A. Noyes, Qualitative Chemical Analysis, 9th Edition, (Macmillan). 

Reference Texts — Stieglitz, Qualitative Analysis Vol L, (Century Co.). 

Ware, Essentials of Qualitative Analysis, (Wiley). 

Treadwell & Hall, Vol. I., (Wiley). 

Curtman, Qualitative Chemical Analysis, (Macmillan). 

Lectures — Tuesday and Thursday, 11-12, rooms 310 and 305, Gordon Hall. 

Laboratory — Secs. 1, 2, Thursday 1-4 and Saturday 9-12;* 

Secs. 3, 4, Wednesday 8-11 and Eriday 1-4. 

Professor Munro. 


Organic Chemistry I. 

For students in Courses B and D, third year. 

An introductory course into the chemistry of the compounds of carbon. 
The principal classes of aliphatic and aromatic compounds are studied to 
illustrate both their theoretical and practical importance. In the laboratory 
a number of typical aliphatic and aromatic compounds are prepared to 
illustrate typical operations employed in organic chemistry. 

Texts — Conant, The Chemistry of Organic Compounds (Macmillan & Co.) 

Adams and Johnson, Laboratory Experiments in Organic Chemistry 
(Macmillan & Co.) 

Lectures — Wednesday and Friday, at 11 in room 310 Gordon Hall 
(Wednesdays) and in Nicol Hall (Fridays). 

Laboratory — B students, Saturday, 9-12 in rooms 213 and 201, Gordon Hall. 

D students, Wednesday, 1-4, first term, and Saturday, 9-12, 
in the second term. 


Professor McRae. 


74 


Organic Chemistry V. 

For students in Course M, third year. 

An introductory course in Organic Chemistry for students in Metallurgy. 
Text-book — Conant, Organic Chemistry (Macmillan & Co.). 

Lecture — Friday 9-10. 

Professor McRae. 


Organic Chemistry II. 

Advanced Organic Chemistry, 

For students in Course B, fourth year. 

The principal reactions used in synthetic organic chemistry with practical 
illustrations in the laboratory. The more detailed chemistry of the aliphatic 
and aromatic series and of the simpler types of heterocylic compounds. 
Laboratory practice in qualitative and quantitative organic chemistry. 

Texts — Kipping and Kipping, Perkin and Kipping’s Organic Chemistry,. 
Part III. 

Conant — The Chemistry of Organic Compounds, (Macmillan & Co.) 

Gattermann-Wieland, Laboratory Methods of Organic Chemistry,. 
(Macmillan & Co.) 

Books of Reference — Cohen, Advanced Organic Chemistry, (Arnold). 
Francis, Notes on Organic Chemistry (Arnold). 

ilickinbottom. Reactions of Organic Compounds (Longmans, Green 
and Co.). 

Lectures — Tuesday and Thursday, at 11, in room 105, Gordon Hall, 
Laboratory — Wednesday, 1-4; Saturday, 9-12, in room 213, Gordon Hall.. 

Professor McRae. 


Organic Chemistry IV. 
Research Training. 


For graduate students and students in Course B, fourth year, electing 
thesis option in Organic Chemistry. Professor McRae: 


75 


QuANTITAflVE ANALYSIS I. 

Short course. 

For students in Courses A, C, D and M, third year. 

This is an elementary course designed to illustrate the fundamental pro- 
cedures of Quantitative Analysis. Gravimetric determinations are made of 
sulphur, chlorine and iron. A full treatment of volumetric analysis is given 
including acidimentry and oxidation-reduction methods. The determinations 
include iron and manganese in simple ores, iodimetric copper and other similar 
determinations. 

Text- — Talbot, Quantitative Chemical Analysis. 

Lectures — A and C, Thursday 1-2, D and M, Wednesday 10-11, in 
room 105, Gordon Hall. 

Laboratory — Thursday, 2-5, for A, Sec. 5 and 6, C, and D ; Friday, 

foT M. Tuesday 1-4, Sec. 1 and 2 of A. Saturday 8-11, 
Sec. 3 and 4 of A. 

Professor Dorrance and Mr. Martin. 

Quantitative Analysis II. 

Full course. 

For students in Course B, third year. 

This course is designed to give training in the principles and practice 
of Quantitative Analysis to students specializing in Chemistry. In the 
lectures methods of analysis are discussed showing the relation of the 
principles of theoretical chemistry to analytical problems. In the laboratory 
the volumetric work includes neutralization, oxidation-reduction and pre- 
cipitation reactions, determinations being made of soda ash, iron ores, paris 
green, copper ores, proteins, oxalates, vinegars, zinc ores and silver salts. 
The gravimetric work includes the analysis of chlorides, sulphates, limestone t 
nickel, zinc and lead ores; alloys, steels and industrial products. A number 
of problems are assigned to* illustrate the topics discussed in the lectures 
and to supplement the laboratory analysis. Throughout the course the 
accuracy and limitations of the methods are emphasized. 

Text — Talbot, Quantitative Analysis. 

Lectures — Monday and Wednesday, at 9, in room 105, Gordon Hall. 

Laboratory — Wednesday, 1-4 and Thursday 2-5 and Tuesday, 1-5, second 
term in 207, 209, Gordon Hall. Professor Dorrance and Mr. Martin. 

Quantitative Analysis IV. 

Research Training. 

For graduate students and students in Course B, fourth year, electing 
thesis option in Quantitative Analysis. 


Professors Frost and Dorrance. 


76 


Physical Chemistry. 

Physical Chemistry I. 

For students in Courses B, C, D, M, third year. 

This course is designed to serve as an introduction to the principles of 
theoretical chemistry both for students proceeding to more advanced work 
and for those who desire to obtain some knowledge of the subject in view 
of its application in other fields. Phenomena involving gases, liquids and 
solutions are approached from the standpoint of the simple kinetic theory. 
A few lectures on the crystalline state are included. The phase rule and 
its applications to systems of two and three components is considered 
thoroughly. The elementary principles of thermo-chemistry, equilibria and 
kinetics are also studied. A large number of problems are assigned. 

Lectures — Tuesday and Thursday, at 9, in room 105, Gordon Hall. 

Laboratory — Friday, 1-4 for B, Tuesday, 1-4 for C, in 115, 116 Gordon 
Hall. 

Students in courses D and M will take physical chemical laboratory in 
the Chemical Engineering Department, under Dr. L. F. Goodwin. 

Tuesday, 1-4, D, M, Sect. 1; Wednesday, 1-4, M (a), Sect. 2; Saturday, 
9-12, M (b). Sect. 2. 

Professor Frost 


Physical Chemistry II. 

Electrochemistry. 

For students in Courses B, D, M, fourth year. 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the application of 
electricity to aqueous solutions considering such quantities as the mechanism 
of electrolysis, transport numbers and ionic migration, solvation of ions, 
conductance of solutions, modern dissociation theory, reversible cells with 
and without diffusion, hydrogen electrode, polarization, overvoltage, anodic 
and cathodic reactions. Some industrial applications such as storage batteries, 
electrolysis of fused salts, electroplating are discussed. The laboratory work 
consists in the determination of the quantities discussed in the lectures, 
electrometric titrations, and the production, electrolytically, of such compounds 
as ammonium persulphate and white lead. 

Prerequisite — Chemistry 1, 2, 12, 13, 14. 

Texts — Creighton, Electrochemistry (Vol. I), (John Wiley). 

Findlay, Practical Physical Chemistry, (Longmans, Green & 
Company) . 

Reference — Kolthoff and Furman, Potentiometric Titrations, (John Wiley). 

Lectures — Monday at 10, and Tuesday at 8. 

Laboratory — M Wednesday 1-4 ; B and D Thursday 2-5. 

Professor Dorrance 


77 


Physical Chemistry III. 

Advanced Physical Chemistry. 

For students in Course B, fourth year. 

This course is designed to give a thorough training in the principles of 
chemical thermodynamics and their application to chemical problems. Practice 
is given in the computation of free energies, activities and entropies of 
substances. 

Lectures — Tuesday and Thursday, at 10, in 105 Gordon Hall. 

Laboratory — Friday, 1-4, in 116 Gordon Hall. 

Professor Frost. 


Physical Chemistry IV. 

Research Training. 

For graduate students and students in Course B, fourth year, electing 
thesis option in Physical Chemistry. 

Professors Frost, Dorrance and Muriro 


Industrial Chemistry 
Industrial Chemistry I. 

Short course. 

For students in Course E, fourth year. 

For outline of topics see under Department of Chemical Engineering. 


Industrial Chemistry II. 

Long course. 

For students in courses B and D, third year. 

D students, third year, see under Department of Chemical Engineering. 

In the lectures the following topics, illustrated by specimens, lantern 
slides and motion pictures and visits to plants, will be discussed : Industrial 
applications of air and water, natural gases, petroleum products, producer 
gas, water gas, coal gas, by-product coke, sulphur, sulphuric acid (chamber 
and contact), sulphites, hydrochloric acid, nitric acid and ammonia, nitrates 


78 


(natural and synthetic,) fertilizers, alkalies, mortars, and cements. In the 
laboratory typical industrial processes as crystallization, precipitation, filtration, 
distillation and rectifications, incomplete reactions, gas analysis, industrial 
flow sheets will be carried out and interpreted. 

Text — Rogers, Manual of Industrial Chemistry (Van Nostrand). 

Handbooks — Atack, Chemists’ Year Book (Westman Press) or 

Chemical Rubber Pub, Co., Handbook of Chemistry and 
Physics or 

Lang’s Handbook of Chemistry or 

Olsen, Chemical Annual (Van Nostrand) or 

Perry, Chemical Engineers Handbook (McGraw-Hill). 

Lectures — Tuesday and Thursday at 10, B in room 310, Gordon Hall, 

Laboratory — B, Monday 1-4, in 500, Gordon Plall. 

D students see under Dept, of Chemical Engineering. 

Professor Neish. 

Industrial Chemistry Hla. 

Advanced, 

For students in Course B, fourth year — first term. 

For outline of topics see under Department of Chemical Engineering. 

Lectures — Wednesday and Friday, at 11, first term, in Ontario Hall. 

Laboratory — Monday, 1-4, first term, in Ontario Hall. 

Professor Goodwin. 

Industrial Chemistry IV. 

Research Training. 

For graduate students and students in Course B, fourth year, electing 
thesis option in Industrial Chemistry, 

Professor Neish. 

Colloid Chemistry la 

For students in Course D, fourth year, first term. A short introductory 
course in Colloid Chemistry. The lectures deal with the general properties of 
the colloidal state, particle size and sedimentation analysis, dialysis, ultra- 
filtration and electrokinetic phenomena. 

The laboratory work illustrates and supplements the material dealt with 
in lectures. 

Text books: 

Thomas, Colloid: Chemistry (McGraw-Hill). 

Lectures — Wednesday at 10, first term. 

Laboratory — Tuesday 1-3, first term. 


Professor Munro 


79 


Colloid Chemistry II 


For students in Course B, fourth year. 

A course in Surface Chemistry treating the general properties of the 
colloidal state and heteroteneous catalysis. The lectures deal with the follow- 
ing topics: the colloidal state, particle size and sedimentation, dialysis, 
Donnan equilibrium, ultrafiltration, electrokinetic phenomena, surface energy, 
interfacial tensions, flocculation and protective action, emulsions, foams, gels, 
plastics, sorption, the mechanism ol catalysts, activation, promotors, carriers, 
retarders, mixed catalysts and heterogeneous chain reactions. 

The laboratory work illustrates the topics dealt with in lectures. 

Texts — 

Thomas, Colloid Chemistry (McGraw-Hill). 

Griffith, The Mechanism of Contact Catalysis (Oxford University 
Press). 


Reference texts — 

Weiser, Inorganic Colloid Chemistry (Wiley and Sons). 
Heuser, Colloidal Phenomena (McGraw-Hill). 

McBain, The Sorption of Gases by Solids (Routledge Co.). 
Maxted, Catalysis and its Industrial Applications (Churchill). 
Schwab-Taylor, Catalysis (Van Nostrand). 


Lectures — First term, Wednesday and Friday at 10 a.m. 

Second term, Wednesday and Friday at 11 a.m. 

Laboratory — Tuesday 1-3 p.m., first term only. 

Professor Munro 

GEOLOGY 


Professor — M. B. Baker, B.A., B.Sc., F.G.S.A., F.R.S.C. 

Miller Memorial Research Professor — 

E. L. Bruce, B.Sc., M.A., Ph.D., F.R.S.C, F.G.S.A. 

Professor — B. Rose, B.Sc., Ph.D., F.G.S.A., F.R.S.C. 

Lecturer — Newton W. Buerger, S.M. 

Assistants — W. C. Giissow, M.Sc., Ph.D.; H. F. Morrow, B.Sc. 

Research Assistant^ — W. T. Love, B.Sc. 

The Geological and Mineralogical Museum, situated on the ground floor 
of Miller Hall, is equipped with splendid collections of minerals, ores, rocks 
and fossils, classified and systematically arranged to illustrate most of the 
subjects treated in lectures. This is a section of the work in which the co- 
operation of the mining public is invited, and all donations to this museum 
will be kept and credited to the donor. 

The various courses in Geology, described in some detail below, are in- 
tended to equip the professional geologist, the mining engineer, the civil 
engineer requiring a knowledge of the relative merits of natural construction 
material. 


80 


GEOLOGY I. 

For second year students in courses A, B, C, D, M. 

Elementary Geology. Students taking this class must have passed in 
Chemistry I. 

An introductory course in general Geology is given preparatory for those 
students who proceed to a more advanced course in Geology or Mining, and 
at the same time a more or less complete, though elementary course for those 
who do not pursue the subject any farther. 

During the month of October excursions will be conducted to places ot 
geological interest in the vicinity of Kingston. Students in Geology and 
Mineralogy are required to take part in these excursions. 

Text-book: Miller, Elements of Geology, (Van Nostrand Co.). 

Lectures — Tuesday and Thursday, 9-10. Professor M. B. Baker. 

GEOLOGY II. 

For third year students in course C. 

Structural, Dynamical, and Physiographical Geology. Before taking 
this class students must have passed in Geology I. 

The principles of gradation, deformation, faulting, mountain formation^ 
and vulcanism are covered in a more general and a more advanced way 
than in Geology I. Attention is also given to the origin of the earth; the 
metamorphic cycle; types of marine and continental sedimentation; an in- 
troduction to paleontology, physiography, map reading and interpretation. 

Text-books : Nevin, Structural Geology. 

Platt, Geological Map Exercises. 

Lectures — Wednesday and Friday, 9-10. Professor Rose. 

Laboratory — Monday, 8-10. 

geology III. (b) 

For students in Courses A and C, third year. 

Elementary Petrography. Students must have passed in Geology I. 

This course is essentially on igneous geology and petrography, and on 
the determination of some of the more common igneous rocks by both micro- 
scopic and field tests. The lectures will be supplemented by laboratory work 
on hand specimens and rock slices. 

Text-book — Pirsson, Rocks and Rock Minerals (John Wiley & Sons). 

Lectures — Thursday 10-11, and Friday 11-12, second term. 

Mr, Buerger. 

Laboratory — Second term. Course A, Sections 1 and 2, Friday 3-5 ; 

Sections 3 and 4, Friday 1-3 ; Sections 5 and 6, Wednesday 
1-3. Course C. Wednesday 1-3. 

Professor Baker, and Mr. Buerger. 


81 


GEOLOGY IV. 


For third year students in Course A. 

Structural Geology — Students must have passed in Geology I. 

Imposed structures in sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks, with 
particular attention to faulting, folding, and shearing. Illustrated mainly 
from Canadian occurrences where possible. 

Text-book — Nevin, Structural Geology. 

Lecture — Friday 11-12, first term and Tuesday 10-11, second term. 


GEOLOGY V. 


Professor Rose. 


For fourth year students in Courses A. and C. 

Geology of Canada. Before taking this class, students must have 
passed in Geology I. and Illb. 

In this course special attention will be given to Pre-Cambrian Geology, 
and the distribution of the various rock formations in Canada. The topo- 
graphy as well as the structural make-up of the Dominion is studied. 

Leeture — Monday, 10-11. Professor Bruce. 


geology VI. 

For fourth year students in Course C. 

Historical Geology. After a brief study of the various types of 
sedimentary formations and the principles of paleogeography, the history 
of the North American continent is taken up with supplementary refer- 
ences to the other continents when desirable. Emphasis is laid on Can- 
adian occurrences. A number of the more important fossils of each period 
are studied, and their recognition on sight required. Brief consideration 
is also given to the history of the Science of Geology. 

Text-book — Pirsson and Schuchert, Text-book of Geology Part II. 

(Historical), (John Wiley & Sons.) 

Lectures — Tuesday and Thursday, 9-10. Professor Rose. 

geology VII. 

For third year students in Course C. 

Advanced Petrography. A laboratory class in which a more intensive 
study is made on the petrographic features of igneous, sedimentary and 
metamorphic rocks than was possible in Geology III. 

Laboratory — Thursday, 2-4, second term. Mr. Buerger 

geology VIII. 

For fourth year students in Courses A and C. 

Economic Geology. This class treats of the principles of ore deposition. 
The basis of classification and the fundamental principles underlying economic 
deposits are studied with particular reference to iron, copper, nickel, zinc. 


82 


lead, silver, gold, aluminum, peat, coal, gas, oil, salt, abrasive and refractory 
materials. A few lectures on building stones as well as on clays and the 
manufacture of clay products will be given. 

Lectures — Tuesday, 11-12, and Thursday, 1-2. 

Professor Baker. 


GEOLOGY IX. 


For third year students in Course E. 

Engineering Geology. This course is intended for students in Civil 

Engineering, and after a brief introduction to geology will treat of the 

occurrence, composition, texture, structure and alterations of rocks, with 
special reference to their effects on the workability or removal of the rocks 
in excavation, and in the selection of raw material in construction work. 
There will also be lectures on clay-products and the selection of building 
materials, and an outline of the manufacture of bricks, fire-proof blocks, 

terra-cotta, roofing-tile, sewer-pipe, and drainage-tile, will be given. Physio- 
graphy and drainage will also be studied, and a brief discussion of the 

principles of economic geology. 

Text-book — Ries & Watson, Elements of Engineering Geology, (John 
Wiley & Sons). 

Lectures — Wednesday and Thursday, 11-12. Professor Baker. 


GEOLOGY X. 

For third year students in Course C. 

Field and Laboratory Geology. The laboratory exercises in this 
course are designed to illustrate by means of specimens, models, photo- 
graphs, maps and sections, the principal original and secondary structures 
of rocks ; and their interpretation and representation in geological surveys. 

The field work comprises practice in methods of surveying and geological 
mapping and construction of sections ; measuring the thickness of strata and 
determining the relative ages of geological structures, and the preparation of a 
map to scale. 

Four working hours per week will be arranged to suit the class at the 
beginning oi the first term. 

Field Work— Monday, 1-5. Professor Rose. 


geology xii. 

For fourth year students in course C. 

A course of lectures will be given on classification of igneous rocks, 
their mode of occurrence, and their field characters. 

Text-book — Harker, Petrology for Students. (Cambridge Press). 
Lectures — Wednesday and Friday, 10-11, first term. 


Mr. Buerger. 


83 


Reports 

For fourih year students in Course C. 

Weekly reports or essays based on field trips, summer work, or on 
topics of a mineralogical or geological nature as prescribed by the departments 
of Geology and Mineralogy will be required. These are intended to test the 
students’ ability to read up a subject, and then to summarize it in presentable 
form for publication. The class will be conducted by the department of 
Geology for the first term, and by the department of Mineralogy for the 
second term. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

For graduates in Courses A (Geology option) and C. 

GEOLOGY XIII. 

Principles of Pre-Cambrian Geology. The origin, history and distribu- 
tion of the rocks older than the Cambrian. Special attention will be given 
to the Canadian Pre-Cambrian areas. The course will be given in alternate 
years. It will be offered in 1939-40. 

Lectures — Wednesday and Friday at 9. 

Reading and Laboratory Work — Wednesday, 1-4. Professor Bruce. 

geology XIV. 

Metamorphic and Structural Geology. The processes of rock weather- 
ing, consolidation of sediments, formation of gneiss, and the wall rock 
alterations produced by veins are studied in detail. The principles of rock 
deformation are discussed. The course will be offered in alternate years. It 
will not be offered in 1939-40. 

Lectures — Tuesday and Thursday at 9. 

Reading and. Laboratory Work — Thursday, 1-4. Professor Bruce. 

geology XV. 

Pre-Cambrian Ore Deposits. Discussion of ore deposits in Pre-Cambrian 
rocks with especial reference to those in Canada. The genesis and character 
of the deposits will be studied in detail. It will be offered in 1939-40. 

Text Book: Bruce, Mineral Deposits of the Canadian Shield, (The 

MacMillan Co.). 

Lectures — Tuesday and Thursday, 9. 

Reading and Laboratory Work — Thursday, 1-4. Professor Bruce. 

Excursions to accessible localities are required. 

Seminar — A Seminar for students in graduate courses meets two even- 
ings each month. It is voluntary and no registration is required. 


84 


MINERALOGY 

Professor— J. E. Hawley, M.A., Ph.D., F.G.S.A., F.R.S.C. 

Lecturer — N. W. Buerger, S.M. 

Assistant — W. J. McGill, B.Sc. 

The work in this department is intended for students taking the courses 
in (1) Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, (2) Chemistry, (3) Mineralogy 
and Geology, and (4) Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering. 

MINERALOGY I. 

For Second year students in Courses A, B, C, D, M. 

Elementary Mineralogy — Lectures cover (1) the physical properties and 
identification of the common rock and ore forming minerals, (2) The rela- 
tion between Mineralogy and Geology, (3) The chemistry of minerals, (4) 
Crystallography, (5) World distribution of minerals which are of economic 
importance, (6) the detailed properties, occurrence and uses of about one 
hundred important minerals. In the laboratory practical work is given in 
crystallography and in the identification of minerals by physical tests and 
blowpipe methods. 

Field trips during October and November are held in conjunction with 
the Department of Geology. 

Each student is supplied for the session with a locked cabinet containing 
a collection of minerals for which he is held responsible. A practical examina- 
tion requiring the identification of minerals in hand specimens must he passed 
by each student before credit in this course will be given. Students are urged 
to make use of the museum, and of the study room provided for them in the 
Mineralogy department. 

Text-books: For Courses A, and C, Ford, Dana's Text-book of Mineralogy 
(Wiley and Sons, 1932). 4th Edition. 

For Courses B. and D, choice of : 

Ford, Dana’s Manual of Mineralogy, 14th Edition, 1929. 

Kraus, Hunt and Ramsdell, Mineralogy (McGraw Hill 
1936). 

Books of Reference: 

Mineralogy — E. H. Kraus and W. F. Hunt, 3rd Edn. 

(McGraw Hill 1936). 

Study of Minerals and Rocks — H. F. Rogers, 2nd Edn. 

(McGraw Hill 1924). 

Brush & Penfield, Manual of Determinative Minera- 
logy and Blowpipe Analysis, 17th Ed., 1912 (Wiley 
& Sons). 

Saturday Excursions. 

Leetiires — Monday at 9 first term; Monday and Friday, at 9 second 
term, Sections 1 and 2; Friday at 10 first term; Frid^ay at 10, 
Monday at 2, second term, Sections 3 and 4. 

Professor Hawley and Mr. Buerger. 

Laboratory — Monday, 1-3, Sections 1 and 2; Monday, 3-5, Sections 3 and 4. 


85 


MINERALOGY II. 

Physical Mineralogy. For students in Course C. Third year, and 
Course A, Fourth year, Geology option. 

The work consists of a course of lectures, dealing with crystallography, 
crystal measurements and drawing, and a more advanced study of the physical 
properties of minerals. 

Text-books — Dana, Text-hook of Mineralogy, 1932. (Wiley & Sons). 

James, R. W., X-Ray Crystallography (Methuen), 1930. 
Books of Reference : 

Bragg, W. L., Atomic Structure of Minerals (Cornell Univ. Press), 
1937. 

Wyckoff, R. W. G., The Structure of Crystals (1931). 

Bragg, X-ray, and Crystal Structure, 4th Ed. 

Lectures — Monday and Wednesday, 10-11, 2nd term. Mr. Buerger. 

Laboratory — Saturday, 10-12, 2nd term. 

MINERALOGY III. 

For students in Courses B, and C, third year, and Course A, Fourth 
year. Geology option, first term. 

Optical Mineralogy — The work of this class deals with the optical 
properties of nonopaque chemical substances and natural minerals. For 
chemistry students it serves as an accurate method of identifying both organic 
and inorganic solid chemical substances by their indices of refraction and other 
optical properties, provided these are known, as a method of proving 
homogeneity of fine chemical compounds, and as an introduction to micros 
chemical methods O'f testing for minor constituents in inorganic compounds. 
For geology and mineralogy students it is preparatory to the classes of 
petrography and determinative mineralogy and deals with the optical properties 
of the common rock forming minerals. 

Text-book: — Dana, Text-book of Mineralogy — 4th ed., 1932. (Wiley and 
Sons), or Elements of Optical Mineralogy (Part I), A. N. Winchell, 
3rd Ed'., (Wiley and Sons), 1928. 

Reference Books: — Optic Properties of Crystals, Groth and Jackson, (Wiley 
and Sons) 1910. 

Crystals and the Polarising Microscope, Hartshorne and Stuart, (E. 
Arnold & Co.), 1934. 

Thin Section Mineralogy, Rogers and Kerr, (McGraw Hill), 1933. 
Lectures — Monday and Friday, 10-11, first term. 

Laboratory — A — Geology Option — Tuesday 1-3, B — Friday 8-10, C — Friday 
1-3, first term. 


Professor Hawley and Assistants. 


86 


MINERALOGY IV. 

For students in Courses A and C, Third year. 

Descriptive and Determinative Mineralogy — Ore Minerals. A course 
dealing with minerals which are important as ores of iron, manganese, chrom- 
ium, tungsten* vanadium, tin, nickel, cobalt, gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc and 
aluminum. In the laboratory suites of ore minerals from various mining 
camps are examined by blowpipe methods and microscopically by polished 
sections. A brief survey is made of some important non-metallic minerals. 
Cabinets furnished with specimens of minerals from various parts of the 
world are supplied for students’ use. Examination of a variety of mineral 
deposits in the vicinity of Kingston are made in October and November. 
Reports on these are required. 

Text-books: Dana, Text-hook of Mineralogy, 4th Ed. 1932. (Wiley and 
Sons). 

Lindgren, Mineral Deposits. (McGraw Hill), 1933. 

Reports on various deposits will be available in reading room. 

Lectures: Tuesday and Thursday at 8. 

Laboratory: Wednesday 1-3, Course A Sections 1, 2 and 3; Wednesday 
3-5, Course C and Sections 4, 5 and 6 of A. 

Professor Hawley and Mr. Buerger,. 
mineralogy V. 

For students in Course C, Fourth year. 

Advanced Descriptive and Determinative Mineralogy — Non-Metallic 
Minerals. A course dealing (1) with the identification of rock forming 
minerals by physical and optical properties ; (2) the occurrence and utilization 
of non-metallic minerals used for Abrasives, Refractories, Ceramic Ware,. 
Lime, Cements, Plaster, Fertilizers, Pigments, Insulators, Building Stone, 
Gems, etc. 

Text-book: Elements of Optical Mineralogy — Part II, (Description of 
Minerals), A. N. Winchell, (Wiley and Sons). 

Reference Books : Publications of Geological Survey of Canada. 

Publications of Mines Branch, Dept, of Mines, Canada.^ 
Publications of U.S. Geol. Survey. 

Non-Metallic Minerals — Ladoo (McGraw-Hill, 1925).. 

Lectures: Wednesday and Friday at 11. 

Laboratory: Saturday, 10-12. Professor Hawley. 


87 


MINERALOGY VI. 

For students in Course C, A (Geology Option) and M, fourth year, 

Mineralography — An advanced laboratory course in the study of metallic 
minerals in polished sections. 

Text — Microscopic Determination of Ore Minerals, U.S.G.S. Bull. 825, 
M. N. Shortt. 

Laboratory — Second term. Tuesday 1-4, Course M, Thursday 2-5, Course C, 
Friday 1-3, Course A (Geol. Opt.), 

Lecture and Discussion — 1 hour to be arranged. 

Professor Hawley. 

Research and Thesis — Students wishing to undertake the research work 
and thesis of the fourth year under the Department of Mineralogy should 
consult with the instructors not later than the beginning of their fourth 
year with regard to research subjects and hours. 

MINERALOGY Vila 

For third year students in Course M. 

Ore Minerals — Their properties, chemistry and association. A course 
of lectures for third year Metallurgy students consisting of the first term 
lectures of Mineralogy IV. 

Lectures — Tuesday and Thursday at 8, first term. 


GRADUATE COURSES 

For graduates in Courses A and C. 


MINERALOGY XV. 

Advanced Optical Mineralogy — A course designed to give students 
further training in the determination of optical properties of minerals. Special 
study will be made of igneous and metamorphic minerals, and of the heavy 
residuals of sedimentary rocks. Not offered during session 1939-40, 

Lectures and Laboratory — 6 hours a week, to be arranged. 


MINERALOGY XVI. 


Professor Hawley. 


(a) Advanced Study of Ore Minerals and Mineralography: 

Texts — Lindgren’s Mineral Deposits (McGraw Hill 1933). 

Determination of the Opaque Minerals — C. M. Farnham, 1st Ed, 
(McGraw Hill, 1931). 

This course alternates with Mineralogy XV, Offered in session 1939-40. 
Lectures and Laboratory — Four hours a week to be arranged. 

Professor Hawley. 


88 


MINING ENGINEERING. 

Professor — S. N. Graham, B.Sc. 

Mining I. 

For students in Course A, third year. 

The first part of this course includes a discussion of the shape and attitude 
of ore bodies and the description of the methods of surveying the under- 
ground openings required to work them. This is accompanied by drafting 
room work on mine mapping. 

The lectures for the balance of the year include the following subjects: 
Prospecting for lode and placer deposits. 

Mining laws and the methods of staking and acquiring mineral prospects. 
Exploration and development of prospects. 

Boring by diamond, churn and other drills. 

Rock drills and steel used in mining operations. 

Explosives, their characteristics and uses. 

Systematic development and methods of shaft-sinking, drifting, cross- 
cutting and raising. 

A brief description of the common mining methods. 

One hour per week in the second term will be given to the reading and 
discussion of essays on prescribed subjects. 

Text Books — Peele, Mining Engineers Handbook. 

Lewis, Elements of Mining. 

Lectures — Monday, 9-10; Tuesday, 9-10 (a) ; Thursday, 9-10 (b). 
Laboratory — Monday, 10-11; and Tuesday, 10-11, first term. 

Professor Graham. 


Mining II. 

For students in course A, fourth year. 

This course is a continuation of Mining I and includes the following 
subjects : 

Rock pressure and methods of support. 

A systematic study of underground metal mining methods. 

A brief discussion of open-pit, placer and coal mining methods. 


89 


Transportation, including mucking, tramming and hoisting. 
Drainage, source of water and methods of handling it. 
Mine atmospheres and mine ventilation. 

The sampling and estimation of ore. 

A study of mine organization and mining costs. 

Mine valuation and reports. 


The course will also include a brief discussion of the principles und( r- 
lying the more common methods of geophysical prospecting, with special 
attention to electrical and magnetic methods. 

Two hours per week throughout the year will be given to the reading 
and discussion of papers on prescribed subjects. 

Text Books — Peele, Mining Engineers Handbook. 

Lewis, Elements of Mining. 

Lectures — Monday, 8-9; Tuesday, 8-9; and Wednesday, 10-11. 

Laboratory — Monday, 2-3; Tuesday, 1-2, first term and 2-3 second term. 

Professor Graham. 

Mining III. 

For students in Course A, fourth year. 

The first term work includes practice and problems in Mine Surveying, 
also the reduction and plotting of a mine survey. 

In the second term these hours are given to furnace and metallurgical 
work or to any subject suitable to the course, as a subject for designing, 
for example, the designing of mill, smelter, surface plant of a mine. 

Wednesday, 1-4. 

Professor Graham 


Mining IV. 

For students in Courses C and M, fourth year. 

This is a course of lectures briefly discussing the formation of ore-bodies, 
their development and exploitation, the machinery and equipment required, and 
the sampling and valuation of mining properties. It is intended to link up the 
work of the geologist and metallurgist with the mine 

Text Book : Lewis, Elements of Mining. 

Lectures- Monday 1-2. Professor Graham. 


90 


Summer Essay. 

For students in Course A, fourth year. 

In order to encourage close observation, and the faculty of expressing by 
text and illustration, the student during his summer vacations is expected to 
gather material for an essay of from two to three thousand words. 

The essay must cover the result of personal observation and be on some 
subject relating to mining, milling, metallurgy or geology. 

The subject title must be given before the end of October, and the essay 
handed in before the first of March. Essays requiring revision must be 
returned before the spring examinations begin. 

All essays must be type-written and suitably bound. 

Ore Dressing. 

For students in Courses A, C and M, third year. 

These lectures follow the sequence of operations on an ore from the time 
it reaches the mill until it leaves as a concentrate or bullion. The principles 
and practice of rock crushing, ball milling, classification and concentration 
on jigs and tables are fully discussed. Particular attention is paid to the 
concentration of ores by flotation. Other accessory processes such as magnetic 
concentration are taken up and the flow sheets of different mills are studied. 

Books of references : Taggart — Handbook of Ore Dressing. 

Truscott, Ore Dressing. 

Richards & Locke, Textbook of Ore Dressing. 

Lectures — Thursday, 11-12; and Wednesday, 8-9, second term. 

Professor Graham. 


Milling. 

For students in Course A and M, fourth year. 

Ores of the more common metals are investigated in the laboratories to 
determine suitable methods of concentration of or recovery of their metals by 
milling. Groups of two or three students are given an ore to investigate. 
Examination of the ore is first carried through by use of the microscope, by 
screen analyses, etc. Based on the information thus gained, a course of 
treatment on a sample of the ore is carried through. Each student takes part 
in the investigation and treatment of as many ores of the precious metals, 
and also of those of base metals as time will permit. 

Laboratory — Friday, 9-4, and Saturday, 9-12. 


Professor Lord 


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Ore Dressing Laboratories 

These are equipped for the testing of ores in small lots from various 
mining districts. 

The equipment consists of a 7 x 10' Blake crusher, rolls and fine grinders. 
There is a complete equipment of modern small, or miniature machines for test- 
ing ores and illustrating principles and processes of treatment. These consist 
of small ball and pebble mills, various types of screens and classifiers, jigs, 
Wilfley tables, several types of small flotation machines and magnetic 
concentrators. 

The Metallurgical Laboratories. 

The Metallurgical laboratories proper contain a blast furnace and a 
large roasting furnace, each served by a bag house ; a Monarch oil furnace 
snd a gas furnace for obtaining temperatures up to 1400'° C; a Hoskins electric 
furnace for temperatures up to 1700° C; three electric arc furnaces; a vacuum 
electric furnace ; two tubular electric furnaces ; a Hump furnace ; an electric 
muffle furnace ; a recording potentiometer ; thermocouple and optical pyro- 
meters ; and calorimeters. 

The Fire Assaying laboratory contains seven gas muffle furnaces of 
different sizes, a three-muffle crude oil furnace, and four gasoline crucible 
furnaces. 

The Metallography laboratory is equipped with a complete cutting and 
grinding plant ; a disc polishing machine ; microscopes, with complete optical 
equipment; a vertical micrograph outfit, and the necessary dark room and 
equipment ; and well selected sets of specimens. 

Two well appointed chemical laboratories, a balance room and a room for 
electrolytic assaying complete the laboratory equipment of the Department. 


METALLURGY. 

Professor — T. V. Lord, B.Sc. 

Assistant Professor — O. A. Carson, B.Sc., Ph.D. 

Metallurgy I. 

For students in Courses E, F, G, third year. 

A brief discussion of the physical properties and uses of the common 
metals. The more important industrial alloys, their composition, properties 
and uses. Refractory materials. The properties of iron and steel, the effects 
of impurities and of methods of manufacture and working, and the heat 
treatment of steel. 

Text-book — Rosenholtz, Elcmous of Ferrous Metallurgy. 

Lecture — Tuesday, 10-11 (a), JVednesday, 4-5 (b). 


Dr. Carson. 


92 


Metallurgy 11. 

For students in Courses A, B, M, third year. 

Heat, calorimetry and pyrometry. Solid, liquid, and gaseous fuels and 
the special metallurgical uses of each kind. An introduction to general 
metallurgy — principles, operations and appliances. The metallurgy of iron 
and steel. 


Text-book — Rosenholtz, Elements of Ferrous Metallurgy. 


Austin, Metallurgy of the Common Metals. 


Leetures — Monday, 11-12; Wednesday, 8-9 (a) ; Tuesday, 11-12 (b). 

Dr. Carson. 


Metallurgy III. 

For students in Course M, third year. 

Metallurgy calculations based on the work covered in Metallurgy II. — 
heat, calorimetry, and pyrometry ; heat balance, iron blast furnace charges, 

etc. 


Laboratory — Monday, 9-10; Wednesday 9-10, first term; Monday and 
Tuesday, 10-11, second term. 


Dr, Carson. 


Metallurgy IV. 

For students in Courses A, M, fourth year. 


The metallurgy of the more common non-ferrous metals — gold, silver, 
copper, lead, and zinc. The extraction of these metals from their ores, the 
refining of the metals, their uses, and the alloys into which they enter. 

A consideration of the ordinary methods of recovering nickel, cobalt, tin, 
arsenic, antimony, etc., from the ores. 

Text-book — Austin, Metallurgy of the Common Metals. 


Dorr, Cyanidation and Concentration of Gold and Silver Ores. 
Lectures — Tuesday, 9-10; Wednesday, 11-12; Thursday, 11-12. 

Professor Lord. 


Metallurgy V. 

For students in Course M, fourth year. 


Metallurgical calculations related to the work covered in Metallurgy IV. 
Discussions of metallurgical subjects by the students and the reading and 
discussion of students’ essays. 


Laboratory — Tuesday, 11-12, first term; Thursday, 9-10, second term. 

Professor Lord. 


Metallurgy VI. 
For students in Courses M, G, fourth year. 


Electro-metallurgy; introductory course in electro-chemistry followed by 
the consideration of the electrolytic refining of copper, gold and silver and 
the electrical smelting of aluminum and iron ores, etc. 

Lecture — Wednesday, 8-9, second term. 


Dr. Carson. 


93 


Metallurgy VII. 


For students in Course M, fourth year. 

Metallurgical plant design. The calculation of the capacities of units in 
a plant — agitators, sumps, pipes, launders, pumps, furnaces, converters, etc. 
Details of equipment. Flow sheets. General layout ol plants. Bills of 
material. Power requirements. 

The work will consist largely of individual problems for the library and 
drafting room. 

Laboratory, Monday, 2-4. 

Professor Lord. 


Metallurgy VIII. 

For students in Course F, fourth year. 

Laboratory course dealing with the heat treatment of steel. 

Laboratory — Friday, 8-10, first term. 

Dr. Carson. 


Metallography. 

For students in Course M, fourth year. 


Introductory course in metallography, including : 

(a) Explanation and interpretation of equilibrium diagrams. 

{b) Constitution and structure of some industrial alloys, with special 
reference to brasses, bronzes, bearing metals and different grades of steel. 
Lecture and Laboratory zvork — Monday, 8-9; Tuesday, 2-5 (a), 1-4 (b). 
Students in Course M, fourth year, who' are going into Milling have the 
option of dropping Metallography at Christmas and substituting Mineralogy 
VIb for the second term. 


Lecture — Tuesday, 1-5 (b). 


Dr. Carson. 


Metallurgical Laboratory. 

For students in Course M, fourth year. 

Laboratory course dealing with a number of metallurgical operations. 


The following experiments are made by the students attending this course : 
Determination of calorific power and impurities in coals, standardization of 
pyrometers by various methods, determinations of cooling curves, decomposition 
of sulphates and reduction of oxides, heat treatment of steel. • 


Electroplating, operation of electric furnaces. 


Laboratory — Thursday, 1-4, first term. 

7'hursd^ay, 2-5, second term. 


Dr. Carson. 


94 


Summer Essay. 

Required of students in Course M, fourth year. 

In order to encourage close observation, and the faculty of expressing by 
text and illustration, the student during his summer vacations is expected to 
gather material for an essay of from two to three thousand words. 

The subject title must be given in by October 15th of the final year, and 
the essay handed in before the end of the first term of the final year. Essays 
requiring revision must be returned before the spring examinations begin. 

The material on which the essay is based must be information gained at 
first hand in metallurgical or chemical plants or laboratories or in mills during 
the equivalent of, at least, one complete summer vacation. 

Fire Assaying. 

For students in Courses A, M, third year, and Course C, fourth year. 

The Laboratory course in fire assaying consists of ; 

(a) A number of experiments to test the action of the different re- 
agents used and slags made in assaying. 

(b) The determination of lead by fire assay methods. 

(c) The determination of gold and silver in silicious, oxidized and 
sulphide ores and mattes. 

Laboratory — First term. Course M, Section ' 2, Tuesday, 1-5. Course A, 
Saturday, 8-12, Sections 1 and 2 and Course M, Section 1 ; 
Second term. Course A, Tuesday 1-5, Sections 3 and 4; 
Saturday 8-12, Sections 5 and 6. Course C, Tuesday 1-5 (b). 


CHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 

Professor — L. F. Goodwin, A.C.G.I., Ph.D., F.I.C. 

Lecturer — G. A. Revell, B.Sc., S.M. 

All lectures and laboratory work in Ontario Hall. 

Industrial Chemistry I. Engineering Chemistry. 

For students in Course E, fourth year. 

A lecture course developed for students in Mining, Mechanical and Civil 
Engineering. Topics such as the rusting of iron and its preservation from 
corrosion, water for steam raising and domestic use, paints, lubricants, ex- 
plosives, pyroxylins and cements are discussed, mainly from the engineer’s 
point of view. 

Texts — Leighou, Chemistry of Materials, (McGraw-Hill Co,) 

Bulletins of the US. Bureau of Mines, Canadian Bureau of 
Explosives, and other pamphlets. 

Lecture — Wednesday, at 10, in Ontario Hall. 


Professor Goodwin. 


95 


Industrial Chemistry II. 

For students in course D, third year. 

For outline of topics, see under Department of Chemistry. 

Texts — E. R. Riegel, Industrial Chemistry, 

T. M. Lo'wry, Inorganic Chemistry, (The MacMillan Co.), 
or J. R. Partington, Inorganic Chemistry. 

Lectures — Tuesday at 10 ; Thursday, 10-11, 11-12, first term, Ontario Hall. 
Laboratory — Saturday, 9-12, first term, Monday, 10-12, second term. 

Professor Goodwin and Mr. Revell. 

Industrial Chemistry Ilia.— -Advanced. 

For students in Course B, fourth year — first term. 

This course deals with the following subjects: Distillation and dephlegma- 
tion, wood distillation, alcohol, acetic acid, acetone. Manufacture of organic 
nitro compounds and explosives. Equilibrium and optimal conditions for contact 
sulphuric acid, synthetic ammonia and nitric acid processes. Catalytic reactions 
in industry and high pressure syntheses. The absorption of gases by liquids 
and solids, absorption and reaction towers, potash manufacture and recovery, 
recovery of waste acids, sulphite, sulphate and mechanical wood pulp. 

Texts — Partington, The Alkali Industry. 

Assigned Reading from Maxted, Catalysis and its Industrial Appli- 
cations. And other publications. 

Lectures — Wednesday and Friday, at 11, in Ontario Hall. 

Laboratory — Monday, 1-4. 

Professor Goodwin. 

Industrial Chemistry iv. 

Research Training 

For graduate students and students in Course B, fourth year, electing 
thesis option in Industrial Chemistry. 

Professor Goodwin. 

Chemical Engineering i. 

For students in Course D, third year. 

A preparatory course in stoichiometrical and plant calculations, and in 
problems in Applied Physical Chemistry. 

Text— Hitchcock and Robinson, Differential Equations in Applied 
Chemistry, (John Wiley and Sons). 

Handbook of Chemistry and Physics. Hodgman-Lange. 

Lecture and Laboratory — Thursday at 11, Friday at 9, second term. 

Professor Goodwin. 


96 


Chemical Engineering ii. 

For students in Course D, fourth year. 

Industrial Processes — The topics dealt with are similar to those under 
Industrial Chemistry III (a), with the addition of: Plant for nitric acid 
manufacture, the influence of heats of reaction. Dissolution, decantation, 
filtration, centrifugals. The moving of gases, liquids and solids. The mea- 
surement of gases, and their absorption by liquids and solids. Absorption and 
reaction towers, their design and the study of filling materials. The manufac- 
ture of nitro compounds, the concentration of weak acids and the recovery of 
waste acids. 

Pulp, Paper and Synthetic Plastics — Absorption principles and sul- 
phite towers. The manufacture of mechanical and sulphite wood pulp. The 
Kraft or Sulphate, and the soda process, modern methods of causticising, 
washing, and of lime, soda and heat recovery. The manufacture of gim- 
cotton, cordite, nitro-cellulose powder, celluloid, viscose or artificial silk, and 
other synthetic colloids. 

A collection of industrial products and apparatus is available for demon- 
stration, and visits are paid to outside chemical works in the final year, at 
which attendance is required. 

Designing of Chemical Plant. Calculations and exercises in designing 
chemical plant and factories. Considerations underlying the choice of materials 
of construction, acid proof containers and cements. Manufacturing costs as 
dependent on the cost of plant, raw materials, labour, etc. 

Texts. — Partington, The Alkali Industry. 

Badger & MacCabe, Elements of Chemical Engineering. 

Hougen and Watson, Industrial Chemical Calculations. 

Assigned Reading from: 

Maxted, Catalysis and its Industrial Applications. 

Davies, Handbook of Chemical Engineering. 

Lunge. Sulphuric Acid and Alkali. 

And Original Publications. 

Lectures — Wednesday and Friday, 11 a.m. 

Laboratory — Saturday, 9-12, first term; Wednesday, 1-4, second term. 

Professor Goodwin. 

Chemical Engineering hi. 

For students in Course D, fourth year. 

A detailed study of apparatus and chemical engineering plant, based on 
the chemical and physical conditions underlying the various processes. The 
elaboration in the laboratory of the best working conditions for a given 
chemical process. 


97 


The designing and drawing of parts of a chemical plant, based on ex- 
perimental results worked out in the laboratory. Experimental work with semi- 
plant scale chemical engineering apparatus. Fuel and heating calculations. 
The gas producer. Materials of construction, stainless steels, their manufac- 
ture and equilibrium diagrams, alloys for high pressure work. 

The practical work will be divided between the laboratory and the 
draughting room as is found necessary. 

Lecture — Tuesday, 3-4, first term; Thursday, 10-11, Saturday, 11-12, 
second term. 

Laboratory — Monday, 1-4 (a), 1-5 (b), Friday, 9-11. 

Professor Goodwin and Mr. Revell. 

Texts : Handbook of Chemistry and Physics; or, Chemiker Kalender, or 
Chemical Engineer’s Handbook. 

Assigned reading from: 

Davies, Handbook of Chemical Engineering. 

Lunge- Cummings, Sulphuric Acid and Alkali. 

And published papers and pamphlets. 

Chemical Engineering iv. 

For students in Course D, Fourth Year. 

Introduction to dimensional analysis and graphical presentation. Illustrative 
chemical engineering problems in fluid flow and heat transmission are given. 

Lectures include the processing of raw materials in chemical plants and 
the necessary apparatus together with the methods and instruments used for 
control. 

In the second term the lectures cover the metallurgy of iron and steel 
and some of the common metals, and non-rusting and other alloys of im- 
portance to chemical industry. 

Texts — Badger and McCabe, Elements of Chemical Engineering ; 

Rosenholtz, Elements of Ferrous Metallurgy. 

Reference Text — Chemical Engineers’ Handbook, Perry. 

Lectures — Wednesday 8-9 (a) ; Tuesday 11-12 (b) ; Thursday 11-12. 

Mr. Revell. 

\ LABORATORY OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 

The laboratory is provided with large size models of steam- jacketed 
evaporating pans, porcelain lined and fitted with stirring gear, with a steam- 
jacketed rectifying column and still, a steam- jacketed vacuum evaporator, 
pump and condenser, a jacketed vacuum shelf dryer, a high pressure acid 
proof filter, a Sweetland self-dumping filter press with sludge tank and 
centrifugal pump, a Sperry plate and frame filter press, a model stream-line 
filter, an ordinary and a high speed centrifuge, a rotating high pressure 
autoclave, and with other technical apparatus. Apparatus is being installed 
ior high pressure synthesis, up to 100 atmospheres. 


98 


There is further installed a large reaction tower of earthenware designed 
for experiments in recovering smelter and other fumes or gases, connected to 
a fan, circulating and measuring devices, and with selected types of earthen- 
ware filling material. 

Instruction in this laboratory is planned to train the student to handle 
fairly large quantities of material and to become familiar with standard types 
of technical chemical apparatus, to work out the experimental methods re- 
quired for attacking a manufacturing problem, and to translate the laboratory 
results obtained into practice. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

Professor — A. Macphail, B.Sc., LL.D. 

Professor — W. P. Wilgar, B.Sc. 

Professor — D. S. Ellis, B.Sc., M.A., M.C.E. 

Assistant Professor — R. A. Low, B.Sc., M.C.E. 

Assistant Professor — J. B. Baty, B.S. 

Lecturer — M. W. Huggins, M.A.Sc. 

Demonstrators — M. A. Dolan, B.Sc. 

C. O. P. Klotz, B.Sc. 

General Engineering I. 

For students in all Courses second year. 

This subject embraces the physical properties of materials used in the 
different branches of engineering and the principles involved in the theory 
of beams, columns, and structures. 

Materials of Construction — Resistance of elasticity of materials ; 
stresses in brick, cement, mortar, and concrete; physical properties of the 
metals and alloys used in engineering, and effects of impurities in them ; 
testing for tensile, compressive and transverse strength. 

Graphical Statics. Graphical representation of stress ; funicular and 
force polygons ; dead and wind loads ; graphical methods of determining 
centres of gravity, shear and bending moments. 

Mechanics of Materials. — Resistance and elasticity of materials : stress 
and strain diagrams ; bending and shearing forces ; compound stress ; de- 
flection of beams; columns and struts; riveted joints; centres of gravity and 
moments of inertia. 

Text-books — Wolfe, Graphical Analysis. 

Seely, Resistance of Materials. 

Books of Reference : 

Merriman, Strength of Materials. 

Thurston, Materials of Construction. 

Merriman and Jacoby, Roofs and Bridges, Part II. 

Slocum & Hancock, Strength of Materials. 

Lectures— Monday and Friday, 11-12, Sections .1 and 2; 9-10, Sections 
3 and 4, A. B. C. D. M. ; 10-11, E. F. G. 


Mr. Huggins. 


99 


General Engineering II. 

For students in Course E, third year. 

Graphical Statics. Graphical determination of stresses in roof trusses, 
bridges, cranes, earth-works, retaining walls, dams, arches, arched ribs, canti- 
lever and suspension bridges. 

Mechanics of Materials. Analysis of restrained and continuous beams 
and columns; torsion of shafts; combined stress;, flexure of beams and 
theorem of three moments ; influence lines ; reinforced concrete ; plate and 
lattice girders and columns ; resilience and fatigue of materials ; initial and 
temperature stresses ; earthworks, retaining walls and dams ; arches and arched 
ribs ; suspension bridges. 

Theory of Structures. Girders, roofs and bridges; selection of types 
v/ith reference to span, landing head-room, cost and other considerations ; 
relative advantages of riveted and pin connections ; wind bracing and stiffen- 
ing trusses ; trestles and towers. 

Text-books — Wolfe, Graphical Analysis. 

Merriman, Mechanics of Materials. 

Books of Reference — 

Slocum & Hancock, Strength of Materials. 

Bovey, Theory of Structures. 

Merriman and Jacoby, Roofs and Bridges, Parts, I., II., III. 

Lecture — Tuesday, 11-12; Thursday, 10-11. 

Professor Macphail. 

General Engineering III. 

For students in Courses, A, D, M, E, F, G, third year. 

This course consists of practical work in the mechanical and testing 
laboratories. Its object is to give the student a knowledge of the practical 
application of the fundamental principles of engineering in general. 

Routine tests of cement, lime, mortar, brick, stone, timber, iron, steel, etc. 
Specific gravity, fineness, tensile and compressive strength of cement, etc. 

Demonstration Photo-Elastic methods. 

Measurement of mechanical power by means of indicators, dynamometers, 
etc. Simple experiments in thermodynamic laboratory. 

Laboratory — Monday, 1-3, for A and E. 

Monday, 3-5, for D, F, G and M Students. 

Professor Ellis, Mr. H. G. Conn. 

General Engineering IV. 

For students in Course E, fourth year. 

Independent work in the testing laboratories. 

Laboratory — Tuesday, 1-4, first term. 


Professor Wilgar. 


100 


General Engineering V. 

For students in Courses A, D, F, M, third year. 

A combined course of lectures, and designing covering the same sub- 
jects as in General Engineering II. 

Text-books — Same as for General Engineering II. 

Lecture — Wednesday, 9-10, A, D; Wednesday, 11-12, M, F; draughting 
Thursday, 2-5, for A, Sects. 1, 2, 3, 4, and M students, Friday, 1-4 for A, Sects. 
5 and 6, D and F students. 

Professor Macphail, Professor Low. 

Gfn'eral Engineering VI. 

For students in C urse E, third year. 

Graphical Representation. Representation of engineering formulae and 
data. Progress and cost diagrams, interpretation of diagrams, solution of 
problems by means of diagrams. 

Graphical Statics. Continuation of work in General Engineering L, 
with relation to roofs, bridges, arches, reinforced concrete and other structures. 

Text-book — Wolfe, Graphical Analysis. 

A.I.S.C. Steel Construction. 

Lecture — Wednesday, 9-10. 

Draughting — Friday, 1-4. Mr. Huggins. 


Structural Engineering I. 

For students in Course E, third year. 

The work of this class comprises lectures and draughting room work 
in the design of buildings. 

In the draughting room students are required tO' design and detail 
structures and structural members. 

Text-book — Young, Structural Problems, A.I.S.C. Steel Construction. 
Books of Reference — Standard Specifications for Concrete and Reinforced 
Concrete. 

Urquhart-O’Rourke, Design of Concrete Structures. 

Hool-Johnson, Handbook of Building Construction. 

Ho'ol-Kinnc, Stresses in Framed Structures. 

U.S. Forest Products Laborator}^ — Wood Handbook. 

Lee til re — Thursday, 9-10. 

Draughting — Thursday, 1-4. 


Mr. Huggins. 


101 


Structural Engineering II. 

For students in Course E, fourth year. 

Design of reinforced concrete structures. Foundations of bridges, build- 
ings and other structures, cofferdams, caissons, substructure types and designs. 

Text-books — Urquhart and O’Rourke, Design of Concrete Structures. 

and 

Jacoby and Davis, Foundations of Bridges and Buildings. 

Books of Reference — 

Haydon, The Rigid Frame Bridge. 

Turnaure and Maurer, Principles of Reinforced Concrete Construction. 

Caughey, Reinforced Concrete Construction. 

Lectures — Monday, 1-2, Thursday, 10-11, first term; Tuesday, 10-11, 
Thursday, 10-11, second term. 

Draughting — Monday, 2-4, first term; 1-4, second term; Friday, 1-4. 

Professor Wilgar 

Structural Engineering IV. 

For students in Course E, fourth year. 

Design of Structures. Lectures comprise the design of details in steel 
bridge trusses and other structures. 

Projects will be given to the class in Bridge Design according to Standard 
Specifications, usually consisting of riveted truss, pin-connected truss, etc. 
Complete stress sheets, working drawings, estimates, etc., being required. 

Text-books — Ketchum, Structural Engineer’s Handbook ; Steel Handbook. 

Books of Reference — 

Merriman and Jacoby, Roofs and Bridges, Pts. I. -IV. 

Waddell, Bridge Engineering. 

Lecture — Tuesday, 9-10. 

Draughting — Wednesday, 1-4; Friday, 10-12. 

Professor Macphail. 

Hydraulic Engineering I. 

For students in courses E, F, G, third year. 

Application of hydrostatic pressure in the case of dams, gates and pipes. 
Flow of water and other fluids and measurement of volume by various orifices 
and weirs. Flow in open channels, ditches, flumes, etc., and the use and 
application of these conductors of waters. Flow through tubes and pipes. Use 
of pipes as conductors of supply for domestic and power purposes. Dynamic 
and static pressure as applied to motors for power purposes. Study of flow 
of liquids other than water. 

Experiments to cover above principles. 

Text-book — Daugherty, Hydraulics. 

Professor Ellis. 

Lectures — Tuesday, 9-10, Wednesday, 8-9, E, F, G. 


102 


Hydraulic Engineering II. 

For students in E, F, and G, fourth year. 

Comprises the study of centrifugal pumps, fans and hydraulic turbines ; 
the elements of hydrology, the design and construction of dams and ap- 
pendages ; measurement, development and transmission of water power ; the 
design of hydraulic power plants : 

Problems in relation to these subjects. 

Text-books — Hydroelectric Hand Book, Creager and Justin. 

Hydraulic Structures, Schoklitsh. 

Air Conditioning and Engineering. 

Centrifugal Pumps — Daugherty. 

Lecture— Monday, 11-12 and Thursday, 9-10, F., Tuesday, 8-9, 

Friday, 9-10, E. G. Professor Ellis. 

Hydraulic Engineering III. 

For students in Courses E, F, G, fourth year. 

Work in Hydraulics Laboratory on selected experiments dealing with 
hydrostatic pressure, orifice, and weir flow, flow through pipes and open 
channels, loss in valves and pipe fittings, efficiency tests on centrifugal 
pumps, and reaction and impulse turbine. Investigation of flow in draft 
tube. Air flow in ducts. Tests on fans. Studies on air foils, etc., in wind 
tunnel. 

Laboratory — Wednesday, 1-4 G, first term. Saturday, 9-12 E, second term 
F — Tuesday, 1-4, second term. Professor Ellis. 

Hydraulic Engineering IV. 

For students in Courses A, D, M, of fourth year. 

Hydrostatics as applied to dams, gates, pipes, etc. Flow of water and 
other liquids through orifices, pipes, and channels ; study of water wheels and 
pumps ; hydraulic models ; air flow ; fans ; ventilation problems on mines 
and buildings. 

Demonstration of experiments in Laboratory. 

Text-books — Hydraulics, King and Wisler. 

Theory and Practice of Mine Ventilation, Montgomery. 

Mine Ventilation, Weekes. 

Lectures — Thursday, 10-11 (a) ; Friday, 8-9 (a) ; Tuesday, 10-11 (b) 
A; Thursday, 10-11 (b) A; Wednesday, 10-11 (b) D, M; 
Thursday, 1-2 (b) D, M. Professor Ellis.. 

Railway Engineering I. 

For students in Course E, third year. 

The work of this class comprises the study of economics of railway 
location ; estimation of traffic ; effects of distance, rise and fall and curvature 
on costs of operation ; the paper location of a railway ; economic selection of 
alternative routes ; turnouts ; crossings ; Mass diagrams ; overhaul ; estimation 
of costs of construction ; signalling, yard design and operation. 

Text-book — Webb, Railroad Construction. 

Lectures — Monday, 11-12; Friday, 11-12. 

Field Work and Draughting — Wedinesday, 1-4. 


Professor Wilgai. 


103 


Engineering Economics. 

For students in Course E, fourth year. 

Valuation of public utilities, depreciation, amortization, government con- 
trol of public utilities as exemplified by the Railway Act. Engineering 
Contracts and Specifications. Economic selection of structures and plant. 

Each student will be required to address the class on a subject of his 
own selection. 

Books of Reference — Gillette and Dana, Construction Cost Keeping and 
Management. 

Mead, Contracts, Specifications and Engineering 
Relations. 

Lecture — Monday, 10-11. Professor Wilgar. 

Municipal Engineering I. 

For students in Course E, third year. 

Discussion of Municipal Problems. Civic Government, financing of 
work, debentures and assessments, introduction to sewerage and water supply, 
roads, walks, gutters, excavation, macadam roads and block paving. 

Laboratory work includes the design of a domestic sewerage system, and 
laboratory practice in sewage and water treatment. 

Lectures — Monday, 10-11 and Tuesday 10-11, second term. 

Laboratory — Tuesday 1-4, second term. 

Special notes and references to chapters in Text-books for Municipal 
Engineering II and III and Highway Engineering. Professor Baty. 

Municipal Engineering 11 . 

For students in Course E, fourth year. 

Water Supply. Municipal water supply. Rainfall. Source of sup- 
ply. Quantity, quality and purification of water. Distribution, designing and 
details of construction. Domestic systems. 

Text-book — Turneaure and Russell, Public Water Supplies. 

Lecture — Thursday, 11-12. 

Laboratory — Thursday, 1-4 (in part) Professor Baty. 

Municipal Engineering III. 

For students in Course E, fourth year. 

The Collection and Disposal of Sewage and Refuse. 

Sewage. The various systems for the collection and removal of sewage. 
Consideration of rainfall, run off, and water consumption. Grades and flow 
in sewers. Design. Methods of construction and materials used. Plumbing. 
Maintenance of sewer systems, including ventilation, flushing, and inspection. 

Sewage Disposal. Methods employed, design, construction, and main- 
tenance of the various systems. 


104 


Refuse Disposal. Kinds of refuse. Methods of collection and disposal 
and economic value of same. Incinerators. 

Text-book — Metcalf and Eddy — Sewerage and Sewage Disposal. 

Books of Reference — Metcalf and Eddy, American Sewerage Practice 
Vols. 1. II. and 111. 

Babbit, Sewerage and Sewage Treatment. 

Lecture — Tuesdgy, 11-12. Professor Baty. 

Laboratory — Thursday 1-4, second term. 

Note. 

Work in Municipal Engineering II and III and Highway Engineering 
has been arranged for one period of three hours per week. Thursday, 1-4. 
Projects in water works, sewer designs, etc., are set and completed during 
these hours. As far as possible each student will be given separate problems. 
A time limit is set on each problem. 

Highway Engineering. 

For students in Fourth Year, Course E. 

Country and city roads and pavements. Lay out, grades, and roadbeds. 
Various kinds of pavements and methods of construction. Cost and dura- 
bility. Method of dust prevention. Low cost bituminous roads. Soil 
mechanics. Traffic control. Street railway track work. 

Projects in highway work are set under actual conditions for design and 
estimate. 

Text-book — Bruce, Highzvay Design and Construction.. 

Books of Reference — American Highway Engineers Handbook. 

Blanchard and Drowne, Highway Construction. 

Agg, Construction of Roads and Pavements. 

Lecture — Wednesday, 11-12. 

Professor Wilgar. 

Laboratory — Thursday, 1-4, first term, in part. 

Surveying. 

All branches of Surveying receive full consideration. During the out- 
door instruction students are given every opportunity to become familiar 
with the instruments. Notes of all field work are plotted in the draughting- 
room, and the rules and regulations for field work and instruments-room 
must be strictly adhered to. Students must be engaged in the work of a 
class in the hours set apart for it, otherwise their attendance will not be 
counted. Attendance and character of work done will be considered in the 
class standing. 


105 

Surveying I. 

Required of all first year students. 

The description, use, adjustment and care of chains, tapes, compasses, 
levels, transits and minor surveying equipment. Methods employed in ele- 
mentary surveying. 

The practical work in the field and draughting rooms is an important 
part of this course. 

Text Books — Davis, Foote and Rayner — Surveying. 

Breed and Hosmer : Elementary Surveying. 

Lecture — {Field Work), Sects. 1, 2, Friday, 1-3, Sects. 3, 4, Monday, 1-3. 

Lecture — {Field Work), Sects. 5-6, Friday 9-11, Sects. 7-8, Monday, 9-11. 

Professor Low, Mr. Klotz. 

Surveying II. 

For students in all courses, second year. 

It continues the work of Surveying I., and includes Land Surveying — 
Route Surveying — profiles, circular and vertical curves, earthwork, elements 
of switchwork : Topographic Surveying — with stadia, plane table, hand level, 
and transit and level; Hydrographic Surveying — Methods, sextant, river 
surveying, stream flow ; Laying out of buildings and engineering construction. 
Underground Surveying. Observations. Errors. 

Text Books — Davis, Foote and Rayner — Surveying. 

Breed and Hosmer : Elementary Surveying. 

Lecture — A. B. C. D. M., Sections 1-2, Wednesday, 8-9; Sections 3-4, 
Thursday, 10-11; E. F. G., Tuesday, 8-9. 

Field Work and Draughting — A. B. C. D. M., Sections 1-2, Wednesday, 
9-12; Sections 3-4, Saturday, 9-12; E. F. G., Sections 1-4, 
Tuesday, 9-12; Sections 5-6, Tuesday, 1-4. 

Professor Low, Mr. Klotz. 

Surveying HI. 

For students in Course E, third year, first term. 

Topographic Surveying, Stream Measurement, Hydrographic Surveying, 
Mine Surveying, Base Line Measurement, Triangulations, Adjustment of 
simple figures. Computation of coordinates. Map Projections; Precise level- 
ling; Observations for Azimuth, Latitude, Time. Introduction to adjust- 
.ment of observations. Outlines of D.L.S. and O.L.S. systems. Descriptions. 

Practice. Field work taken at Field Survey class which is pre-requisite. 

Text-book — Davis, Foote and Rayner, Surveying. 

Lecture — Wednesday, 10-11, first term. 

Field Work and Draughting — Tuesday, 1-4, first term. 


Professor Ellis. 


106 


SURVEYING FIELD WORK 

The class in surveying field work is intended to give the third year students 
in courses A, C and E an oppoTtunity to become familiar with instruments 
and methods of survey under conditions approximating those of commercial 
work. It is prerequisite for Surveying III. 

The syllabus covers field work on the following lines, simple triangula- 
tion, base lines, stadia, plane table, location of engineering structures, land' 
boundaries and possibly soundings and stream measurements ; azimuth obser- 
vations on sun and polaris, mine surveying. 

In rotation each student will take charge of his own party and ability tO‘ 
organize and direct work will in part determine his standing. 

Individual copies of the notes will be prepared day by day by the note 
recorders of each party. These will be used later in preparing plans, etc. 
Observations, etc., will be worked out as taken. 

The work will be carried out in the vicinity of Kingston. Transport wilk 
be arranged by the department. Students will require to carry lunches on. 
most days. Each student will require tables, etc., and a reading glass is com- 
pulsory. 

Students intending to take this class are required to notify the Registrar 
not later than August 1st. 

The class work will commence at 9.00 a.m. on Monday, September 11th,, 
and will end Saturday, September 23rd. 

Professor Ellis and Professor Low.. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

Professor — D. M. Jemmett, B.Sc., M.A. 

Assistant Professor — H. H. Stewart, B.Sc., M.S. 

Lecturer — H. S. Pollock, M.Sc. 

Demonstrators — R. A. Doherty, B.Sc. 

D. M. Bews, B.Sc. 

Electrical Engineering I. 

FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES 

For third year students in Courses A, D, M, E. 

The electric circuit. The magnetic circuit. Generated and induced'" 
electro-motive forces. Self and mutual induction. Elementary theory of 
alternating and direct current generators and motors. Common systems of 
transmission and distribution ol electric current. General principles of 
illumination. Storage batteries. 

Lectures — Monday, 10-11 (a), 9-10 (b) ; Friday, 10-11, for D, M and 
E students; Tuesday, 11-12 (a), 9-10 (b) and Friday, 8-9' 
for A students. 

Laboratory — D, M, Monday, 1-3; A, Sects. 1, 2, 3, and E, Monday, 3-5; 

A, Sects. 4, 5, 6, Wednesday, 10-12. 

Mr. Pollock, Mr. Dohert>^ and Mr. Bews.. 


107 


Electrical Engineering II. 

For third year students in Courses G and H. 

Alternating currents. The use of the complex quantity. Energy and 
power in A. C. circuits. Laws governing the flow of current in circuits con- 
taining resistance, inductance and condensance. The theory, construction and 
operation of the transformer. Meters and the measurement of electrical 
quantities. 

Lectures — Wednesday, 9-10; Thursday, 11-12. Professor Stewart 

Laboratory — Tuesday, 1-4. Professor Stewart, Mr. Doherty. 

Electrical Engineering III. 

For third year students in Course G. 

The electric and magnetic circuits, hysteresis and hysteresis loss. 
Measurement of magnetic quantities. Some simple transients. Theory of dir- 
ect current generators and motors. Series, shunt and compound machines. 
Energy losses, efficiency and commutation, methods of control, Storage bat- 
teries. Application of direct current in commercial work. Illumination and 
photometry. 

Lectures — Monday, 9-10 (a); Tuesday, 10-11 (b) ; Wednesday, 11-12; 
Thursday, 10-11. Professor Jeramett. 

Laboratory — Saturday, 9-12. Professor Jemmett, Mr. Bews. 

Electrical Engineering IV. 

For third year students in Course F. 

The electric circuit. Continuous-current meters. Continuous-current gen- 
erator and motor. Batteries. Illumination. 

Lectures — Monday, 9-10, (a) ; Tuesday, 10-11 (b) ; Friday, 11-12 (a) ; 
Thursday, 8-9 (b). Mr. Pollock. 

Laboratory — Tuesday, 3-5. Mr. Pollock, Mr. Doherty, 

and Mr. Bews. 

Electrical Engineering V. 

For fourth year students in Course G. 

Theory of alternating current generators. Synchronous and Asynchronous 
Motors. Rotary Converters. Potential Regulators, Phase changing. IMulti- 
phase Systems. Transmission of power. Applications of alternating current 
in commercial work. 

Lectures — Monday, 11-12; Tuesday, 9-10; Thursday, 11-12; Friday, 10-11. 

Professor Jemmett. 

Laboratory — Thursday, 1-4; Friday, 1-4. 

Professor Jemmett and Mr. Doherty. 


108 


Electrical Engineering VI. 

For third year students in Courses G and H. 

Properties of electrons and their dislodgement from atoms of vapours, 
gases and solids. Physics of thermonic vacuum tube. Photo electricity. 
Gaseous rectifiers. 

Lectures — Monday, 9-10 (b) ; Thursday, 9-10 (b). 

Professor Stewart 

Electrical Engineering VII. 

For fourth year students in Course F. 

Fundamental principles of alternating-current circuits. Single phase and 
polyphase circuits. Study of the alternating-current generator, the transformer, 
the induction motor, the synchronous motor, single-phase motors, and rectify- 
ing devices. 

Lectures — Monday, 10-11; Wednesday, 1-2. Professor Stewart. 

Laboratory — Wednesday, 2-4. Professor Stewart and Mr. Bews. 

Electrical Engineering VIII. 

For fourth year students in Courses G and H. 

Exact solution of transmission lines in the steady state. The general 
differential equation. Solution in hyperbolic functions. Free, grounded 
and loaded lines. Nominal and Equivalent tt and T lines. Constant volt- 
age systems. Theory of Filters. Use of complex circular and hyperbolic 
tables and charts. Solution of power and telephone lines. 

Lecture — Monday, 10-11. 

Laboratory — Tuesday, 1-4 (a) ; 2-5 (b). Professor Jemmett. 

Electrical Engineering X. 

For fourth year students in Course G. 

Design and Calculation of performance of transformers, generators and 
•motors. 

Lecture — Tuesday, 11-12 (a) ; 10-11 (b). 

Draughting Room — Monday, 1-4. Professor Stewart. 

Electrical Engineering XII. 

For fourth year students in' Courses G and H. 

A course for the study of the various types of electron tubes and their 
applications. The three-electrode vacuum tube as an amplifier, oscillator, 
detector and modulator. Special types of vacuum tubes. Application of 
electron tubes to radio, wire telephony and power. 

Lectures — Wednesday, 10-11; Thursday, 10-11. Professor Stewart. 

Laboratory — Saturday, 9-12. Professor Stewart and Mr. Pollock. 


109 


Electrical Engineering Laboratories. 

Laboratories Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 are equipped with standard types of direct 
and alternating current machines which include synchronous motors and 
generators, rotary converters, polyphase induction motors, repulsion and com- 
pensated induction motors, constant current transformers, series and potential 
transformers, power transformers, direct current shunt, series and compound 
wound machines. A complete set of rheostats and brakes with all necessary 
meters are available for determining the performance of these machines. 

Laboratory No. 5 is the radio laboratory and is equipped with power 
supplies of all kinds necessary for vacuum tube experiments, audio frequency 
oscillators and calibrated attenuators, vacuum tube voltmeters, a signal gen- 
erator and output meter for measuring receiving characteristics, a distortion 
and noise measuring set, two audio frequency bridges for measurement of 
resistance, inductance and capacity and all necessary meters. A magnetic and 
a cathode ray oscillograph are available for wave form, study. 

Laboratory No. 6 contains the experimental broadcasting station CFRC 
which operates on a commercial basis for about sixteen hours a day. 

Laboratory No. 2 contains the storage battery, balancer and booster con- 
trol panels and a transformer giving voltages up to 100,000 volts. A sphere gap 
voltmeter is available for measuring high voltages. 

Power is available from the University Plant at 220/110 volts D.C. direct 
or through a motor — generator set which delivers power at 120/60 volts D.C. 
and 2 phase 85 volts 25 cycles A.C. A 125 volt, 200 ampere hour storage 
battery and city power at 3 phase 220/110 volts 60 cycles are also provided. 

A large number of circuits which have terminals in the various labora- 
tories enable power to be easily transferred from any machine to any other 
machine. 

The University Power Plant is a combination direct and alternating 
current system making available for study and observation such apparatus as 
D.C. generators, synchronous motors, Tirril regulators, balancer sets, storage 
batteries, power transformers, watthour meters, boosters, switchboard ap- 
paratus, etc. 

The City of Kingston has a new and up-to-date hydro-electric station, to 
which visits are made for instruction and observation. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

Professor — L. M. Arkley, M.Sc. 

Associate Professor — L. T. Rutledge, B.A.Sc. 

Lecturer— H. G. Conn, B.Sc. 

Mechanical Engineering I. 

Elements of Machine Design. 

For students in courses F and G, third year. 

The work in this class comprises a study of the following: — Charac- 
teristic of materials used in machine construction ; a review of the principles 
of simple stress and bending moments, their application to beams, columns 
and machine fixtures ; principles governing design, selection of working 


no 


stresses; horizontal and vertical shear atid compound stress; distribution of 
stress in machine parts; analysis of stress and design of fixtures; for 
example, rivetted connections, bolts, nuts, screws, keys, cotters and pins; 
analysis of stress in simple shafting, crank shafts on two bearings; shaft 
couplings; miscellaneous problems of design, i.e., design of wall brackets, 
bases and frames for machinery; bearings; graphical solutions applicable in 
design, i.e., Mohr’s Method of determining the position of the Centre of 
Gravity and Moment of Inertia of a complex section; study of manufacturing 
and machine processes as applied to the manufacture of machinery. 

Text-books — FmidmnentaJs of Machine Design by Norman Ault and 
Zarobsky; Marks, Mechanical Engineers’ Handbook. 

Lectures — Monday, lO-ll; Tuesday, 11-12, F. and G. 

Professor Rutledge. 


Mechanical Engineering II. 

Transmission of Power and Machinery. 

For students in courses F, G, third year. 

The work in this class consists of analyses of stress and design of power 
transmission systems, comprising belt, rope, chain and gear drives ; study of 
couplings, friction clutches and brakes. Dynamics of Machinery including 
speed fluctuations in machinery, kinetic energy of machines, inertia, proper 
weights of flywheels, accelerations in machines and their effects. Disturbing 
lorces : stresses due to inertia, balancing of machinery. 

Text-books — Fnndmnentals of Machine Design by Norman Ault and 
Zarobsky; Theory of Machines, by Angus; Mark’s 
Mechanical Handbook. 

Lectures — Monday, 11-12; Friday, 9-10 and 11-12; second term only. 

Professor Rutledge. 


Mechanical Enginedring III. 

Practical Machine Design. 

For students in courses F, D, M, third year. 

This course is a practical application of work taken up in Mechanical 
Engineering I. and II., which courses are prerequisites of the course Mech- 
anical III., Dept. F. 

Draughting — Wednesday, 1-4, F : Thursday, 1-4 F ; Wednesday, 1-4, D 
and M, second term. Professor Rutledge, 

and Demonstrator 


Ill 


Mechanical F,ngineering IV. 

The Elements of the Power Plant 

For students in Courses A, D, E, and G, fourth year. 

This course covers the following: — Fuels and combustion; transfer of 
heat; heating surface; generation of steam; types of boilers; chimneys; arti- 
ficial draft ; smoke prevention ; mechanical stoking ; coal handling ; use of 
superheated steam ; feedwater heaters ; condensing systems ; pumping machin- 
ery; compressed air; gas and oil engines; gas producers and heating systems. 

Lectures — Thursday, 9-10, and Tuesday, 10-11 (a), 1-2 (b). 

Professor Arkley. 

Mechanical Engineering V. 

Advanced Machine Design 

For students in Course F, fourth year. 

This course consists of a more intensive treatment of the elements of 
Machine Design and a more intensive study of simple and combined stresses. 
It covers the following: — Theory of the curved beam and the application of 
the theory to the design of curved beams, crane hooks, curved links, rings, 
punch press frames; eccentricity of loading; stress in a member acting 
as a beam and a strut simultaneously ; the study of stresses in crank shafts 
including multiple cylinder crank shafts with more than two bearings ; forces 
acting on and through the moving parts of machines involving the study of 
kinetics ; analysis of stress in a member which is built up of two or more 
materials of different values of the modulus of elasticity; effect of wide 
variations of temperature on stress values in machine parts. Analyses of 
;stresses in automobile parts. 

This course includes the study of lubrication and lubricants, the design 
of bearings of all types; the design of flywheels, brakes, clutches, spiral and 
worm gearing ; the mechanical details and design of mine hoisting equip- 
ment, miscellaneous mine machinery such as skips, cages, mine cars and 
loading pockets. 

Tool engineering including the design and operation of cutting tools, 
jigs, fixtures, gauges, cams. Studies of manufacturing processes and methods 
in automobile and aircraft manufacture and assembly; safety devices and 
■equipment in industry. 

Text-books — Reference books and technical journals in the Mechanical 
Library. 

Lectures — Tuesday, 10-11; Wednesday, 11-12; 7'hursday, 11-12. 

Laboratory — Monday, 1-4; Tuesday, 1-4 (a). 


Professor Rutledge. 


112 


Mechanical Engineering VI. 

Design of Power Plants, Heating, Ventilating and Refrigeration. 

For students in Course F, fourth year. 

This course deals with the following: — The proportioning and selection- 
of elements and, their combination in steam power plants to obtain the maxi- 
mum profit from investment and operation. Theoretical and practical prin- 
ciples governing the design and operation of gas producer plants. Power 
plant testing methods and apparatus. 

Heat losses from buildings ; design of warm air, hot water and steam 
heating systems. Discussion of refrigeration systems. 

Text-books — Reference books in Library, Hoffman, Heating and Ventilat- 
ing; Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning by Allen 
and Walker. 

Lectures — Wednesday, 10-11 (a), and Thursday, 10-11. 

Professor Arkley. 

Mechanical Engineering VII. 

Practical Machine Design. 

For students in Course G, third year. 

This course is a practical application of work taken up in Mechanical L 
and II. which courses are pre-requisites of the course. 

Draughting — Thursday, 1-4. Professor Rutledge. 

Mechanical Engineering VIII. 

Fuel Testing. 

For students in Course F, fourth year. 

This course covers the following: — 

Testing of fuels, gaseous, liquid and solid, with respect of their suitability 
for power generation. Gas and fuel analysis. Calculation and calorimetric 
determination of the heating value of fuels. Gas analysis in connection with 
the operation of steam boilers, gas and gas producers. Physical tests of 
lubricants. Causes and prevention of boiler scale. Treatment of feed-waters. 

Laboratory — Thursday, 1-4; Saturday, 9-12, second term. 

Professor Arkley and Demonstrator. 

Mechanical Engineering IX. 

Kinematics of Machinery. 

For students in Courses E, F, and G, second year. 

This course treats of the theory of mechanisms with special attention to 
the following: The nature of a machine; uniform and variable motion in 
machines; velocity diagrams, motion diagrams using the phorograph method; 
applications to various mechanisms found in engines, locomotives and 
machinery ; crank effort and torque. 


113 


The design of gears and cams are treated from first principles including 
development and design of tooth profiles for cycloidal involute and stub teeth ; 
simple, compound and epicyclic gear trains and proportioning of speeds in 
machine tools. 

Text-book — Angus, Theory of Machines. 

Lecture — Wednesday, 10-11. 

Draughting — Sections 1, 2, 3, Thursday, 1-3 ; Sections 4, 5, 6, Thursday, 3-5. 

Professor Rutledge and Demonstrator, 

Mechanical Engineering XI, 

Internal Combustion Engines. 

For students in Course F, fourth year. 

This course consists of the design of gas, gasoline and oil engines, suitable 
for use in automobile, tractors and stationary engines. 

Text-book — Streeter and Lichty, Internal Combustion Engine. 

Lecture — Wednesday, 8-9 (a) and 10-11 (b). Mr. Conn. 

Mechanical Engineering XII. 

A short course in the Elements of Machine Design for third year D and 
M students. 

Similar to Mechanical Engineering I. 

Lectures — Tuesday, 11-12 (a) ; Thursday, 10-11 (b) Mr. Conn. 

1 Thermodynamics I. 

Elementary Thermodynamics. 

For students in Courses A, D. M, E, F, and G, third year. 

The course consists of a study of the following : — Fundamental laws of 
Thermodynamics ; specific heats ; special changes of state, i.e., constant 
volume, constant pressure, isothermal, adiabatic, polytropic ; ideal cycles 
with perfect gases. Carnot, Stirling and Ericsson cycles ; air compression, 
work and temperatures, maximum economy of compression; thermal properties 
of saturated vapors and of vapor and liquid mixtures ; properties of steam ; 
use of steam tables ; miscellaneous type problems on the above. 

Text-book — Elementary Engineering Thermodynamics by V. W. and 
G, A. Young. 

Lectures — A, Friday, 10-11; D, M, E, F, G, Fridgy, 8-9. 

Professor Rutledge. 

Thermodynamics III. 

■ Advanced Thermodynamics, i 

For students in Courses D, and F, fourth year. 

This course treats of the following ; — Theory of refrigerating machines 
and systems. Entropy and entropy-temperature diagrams. Superheated 
steam. Performance of actual engines. Influence of size, speed, valve gear 


114 


and ratio of expansion on economy. Steam jackets, Compound and triple 
expansion engines. Advanced theory of gas and oil engines. Action of steam 
upon turbine buckets. Flow of steam through nozzles, orifices, and turbine 
passages. Effects of friction on flow. Types of steam turbines, and their 
operation. 

Experiments in Thermodynamic Laboratory and local power plants. 

Lectures — Monday, 8-9; Tuesday, 9-10. 

Laboratory — D, IV ednesday, 1-4; F, Thursday, 1-4, first term. 

Professor Arkley and Mr. Conn. 

Thermodynamics IV. 

Advanced Thermodynamic Laboratory Work. 

For students in Course F, fourth year. 

This course consists of advanced engine and power plant testing. 

Laboratory — Friday, 10-12, 1-4. 

Professor Arkley and Demonstrator. 

Thermodynamics V. 

Elementary Power Plant Engineering. 

For students in Course F, third year. 

This course consists of a study of the design and action of slide, corliss, 
piston and poppet valves, etc., valve diagrams of fixed and reversible gears, 
engine governors. It also includes work on steam boilers ; steam engines ; 
pumps, and steam piping; mechanical stoking and the burning of pulverized 
fuel; compressed air, gas and oil engines; gas producers and locomotives. 

This work is carried on in conjunction with draughting room exercises 
and practical valve setting on laboratory apparatus. 

Lectures — Monday, 9-10 (b) ; 11-12 (a) ; Wednesday, 9-10. 

Laboratory — Tuesday, 1-3. Professor Arkley and Demonstrator. 

Thermodynamics Laboratory. 

The Thermodynamics Laboratories are now divided into two sections, 
first the Internal Combustion Engine laboratory in Fleming Hall, and second, 
the steam laboratory located at the New Central Heating Plant on King 
Street. The equipment of the former includes a nine horsepower Diesel 
engine, a four stroke cycle oil engine, a two stroke cycle gasoline engine, 
a two cylinder Westinghouse gas engine directly connected to a generator 
and completely equipped for testing, a semi-Diesel Hoag engine, a six 
cylinder Buick motor car engine, an eight cylinder Ford motor car engine, 
a Chrysler 77 sectionalized engine and chassis, a Ford sectionalized engine 
and chassis, a modern motor driven air compressor, a Froude Brake and 
equipment for testing radiators and heating systems in the building. 


115 


The steam laboratory proper containing a number of types of steam en- 
gine, an air compressor, a condenser and pump, injector testing equipment, etc. 

The work in this laboratory is given in connection with the Central 
Heating Plant where the auxiliary equipment such as steam turbines, centri- 
fugal and reciprocating pumps, water tube and fire tube boilers and feed- 
water heaters are all available for study and investigation by the students, they 
having been designed with this object in view. 

A valuable feature in connection with this plant is the study of different 
methods of heating as carried out from one Central Plant. The whole plant 
is conveniently equipped for making overal efficiency tests under practical 
working conditions. 

The boilers are equipped with superheaters which makes investigations 
on the important question of superheated steam possible. 

SHOP WORK 

Instructors — A. C. Baiden, Machine Shop. 

W. E. Connolly, Blacksmith Shop and Welding. 

For students in Courses E, F, and G, second year; Course F, third 
year ; Course D, fourth year. 

Students in courses F and G shall enter any commercial works approved 
by the School and take a special course of shop training extending over a 
period of thirty-six weeks (18 weeks between second and third, and 18 weeks 
between third and fourth college years) ; or, in case accommodation cannot be 
secured, they shall attend a special course in the workshops of the school, 
extending over a period of 8 weeks (4 weeks preceding their third college 
year and 4 weeks preceding their fourth college year). 

A student in Course H. shall enter any commercial works approved by 
the University and take a special course of shop training extending over a 
period of 12 weeks, between the second and third years of his course. 

If a student enters a commercial machine shop tO' take his practical 
work, as indicated above, he must at the end of each term present a 
certificate from the manager of the plant stating the character of the 
work taken and the amount of time spent in the various departments. 

The student must present the certificate to the Professor of Mechanical 
Engineering who has general supervision over all shop work. 

A complete forge shop forms part of the equipment, so that efficient 
instruction can be given in machine shop practice, and in blacksmithing. The 
forge shop is located in the basement of the workshop building, and is equipped 
with the latest type of down draft forges, and electric drive for the blower 
and exhauster. 


116 


In connection with the work in blacksmithing a short course is now 
given in cutting and welding by the Oxy-Acetylene process. Five welding 
tables and one cutting bench have been installed and completely equipped with 
the most modern torches and other apparatus supplied by the Dominion 
Oxygen Company. Instruction is also given in electric welding. 

Students in all courses will be given a course of practical work in work- 
shops of the School as per schedule of courses. 

Work Shop — Second year, E, F, and G, Sections 1-2, Wednesday, 1-4; 

Sections 3-4, Tuesday, 1-4; Sections 5-6, Tuesday, 9-12. 

Third Year, F, Saturday, 8-11 (a), 9-12 (b). 

Fourth Year, D, Friday, 1-4, second term. 

DRAWING 

Professor — A. Jackson, B.Sc. 

Lecturer — H. J. Styles, B.Sc. 

Demonstrator — A. O. Monk, B.Sc. 

All drawings are to be drawn in the drafting room assigned. Drawings 
made by the students are considered the property of the department. 

DRAWING I. 

For all first year students. 

Each student at the opening of the term must provide himself with a set 
of drawing instruments of approved standard. 

The class standing will be determined by the term’s work. 

The work will consist of freehand lettering and sketching, geometrical 
drawings, auxiliary views, sections, screw threads, dimensioning, working 
drawings, assembly drawings, tracing, checking and blue printing. 

Text-books — Svensen, Drafting for Engineers. 

Svensen, Schumann and Street, Drafting Problem Layouts. 

Sections 1-4, Tuesday, 9-12. 

Sections 5-8, Wednesday, 9-12. 

1 DRAWING II. 

* For students in Courses A, B, C, D, and M, second year. 

The work will include structural and machine drawing, assembly drawings, 
detail drawings from free-hand sketches of details of machines, developed 
surfaces and intersections, tracing, checking and blue-printing. 

The class standing is determined by the term’s work. 

Text-books— Svensen, Drafting for Engineers. 

Svensen, Schumann and Street, Drafting Problem Layouts. 

Secs. 1 and 2, Friday, 1-4; Secs. 3 and 4, Wedpesday^ 1-4. 


117 


DRAWING III. 

For students in Courses E, F, and G, second year. 

A more extended course than as outlined in Drawing II. 

The class standing is determined by the term’s work. 

Text-books — Svensen, Drafting for Engineers. 

Svensen, Schumann and Street, Drafting Problem Layouts. 

Monday, 3-5, first term; Thursday, 9-12. 

Projection 

For first year students in all courses. 

A course in the principles of Orthographic, Axonometric and Isometric 
Projection, and the projections of a solid revolved about different axes. 

Also a short course in Descriptive Geometry preparatory to that subject 
in the second year dealing with problems involving true length of line and 
size of a plane, true slope of line and plane and projection of lines and planes 
on auxiliary planes. 

Text-books — Svensen, Drafting for Engineers. 

Warner, Applied Descriptive Geometry. 

Sections 1-2, Thursday, 9-12. 

Sections 3-4, Friday, 1-4. 

Sections 5-6, Thursday, 1-4. 

Sections 7-8, Friday, 8-11. 

Descriptive Geometry 

Required of all second year students. 

This class continues the work in Descriptive Geometry which was taken 
in the class in Projection and includes solution of problems dealing with 
perpendiculars to lines and planes, intersections of planes, common perpen- 
diculars to two lines, dihedral angles, angle between line and a plane, 
projections of plane figures and solids lying on a plane, mining and guide 
pulleys, tangent planes, revolution of lines and planes and perspective drawing. 

Text-book— Warner, Applied Descriptive Geometry. 

A, B, C, D, M, Secs. 1 and 2, Tuesday, 1-3; Secs. 3 and 4, Thursday, 1-3. 

E, F, G, Monday, 1-3. 


118 


PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Medical Officer: Dr. J. T. Tweddell. 

Physical Director: James G. Bews. 

Assist. Physical Director: John F. Edwards, B.A. 

Each first year student is given a careful examination by the Medical 
Officer at the beginning of his college course, the appointments being made 
on the day of registration. Corrective and remedial work is then given in 
the gymnasium when it is needed by the students. 

With the exception of those excused by the Medical Officer because of 
ill-health, all first year students are required to take two hours of gymnasium 
work per week during the whole of the school year. The timetable for 
such classes is posted in the gymnasium very soon after registration and 
these classes may be taken voluntarily by any registered sophomore, junior, 
or senior in good standing. The work varies throughout the year and as 
much time as possible is spent outdoors in the early Fall and Spring. This 
consists of touch football, track and field, and softball, while every student 
is given a swimming test and the non-swimmers are automatically placed in 
an instruction group. 

Indoor work follows with cooler weather and consists of swimming, 

Danish calisthenics, marching, setting up exercises, and apparatus work on 
the parallel bars, the side horse, the mats, and the horizontal bar. The 

winter term brings basketball, indoor softball, group games, and indoor 
track and field. Each student is encouraged to learn something about all of 
these activities and a wide variance of exercise is achieved. 

Equivalent credit is given for attendance at regular organized swimming 
and life-saving classes, C.O.T.C. training, and for participation on university 
teams in track, football, basketball, hockey, water polo, gymnastics, tennis, 
and boxing and wrestling. Such credit TERMINATES WITH THh 
REGULAR SCHEDULED PROGRAMME OF ACTIVITIES OF EACH 
RESPECTIVE CLUB, when students will rejoin the weekly gymnasium 
classes or engage in any other of the sports listed above. At the start of 

the Fall term, each new student must report at the office of the Physical 

Director, located in the main gymnasium building. 


119 


MEDALS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PRIZES IN SCIENCE 

Awarded 1938 

Medals 

Governor-General’s Medal — K. W. Scobie, Hamilton, Ontario. 
Departmental Medals : 

Mining Engineering — T. M. Kerr, Vankleek Hill, Ontario. 

Chemical Engineering — E. J. Wiggins, Trenton, Ontario. 
Metallurgical Engineering — K. W. Scobie, Hamilton, Ontario. 

Civil Engineering — A. D. McGinnis, Kingston, Ontario. 

Mechanical Engineering — K. El. McKibbin, Kingston, Ontario. 
Electrical Engineering — E. E. Bimm, Eganville, Ontario. 

First Year Scholarships 

The University Scholarships in first year Science — 

Group A, value $100 each : 

R. S. Rettie, Ottawa, Ontario. 

J. M. Lynch, Trenton, Ontario 

W. M. Martin, Heatherdale, Prince Edward Island. 

E. E. Campbell, Toronto, Ontario. 

Group B, value $75 each : 

J. Van Damme, Arvida, Quebec. 

J. A. Breadner, Ottawa, Ontario. 

S. W. Breckon, Norwood, Ontario. 

H. V. Smeltzer, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. 


The W. W. Near Scholarship $100 

R. S. Rettie, Ottawa, Ontario. 

The Robert Bruce Scholarship about $80 

H. P. Thomas, Ottawa, Ontario. 

The N. F. Dupuis Scholarship $50 

J. M. Lynch, Trenton, Ontario. 

The W. M. Moffat Scholarship $40 


W. M. Martin, Heatherdale, Prince Edward Island. 


120 


Second Year Scholarships 

The W. W. Near Scholarship 

N. Z. Alcock, Vancouver, British Columbia, 

The P. D. Ross Scholarship, No. 1 

R. W. Kraft, Kitchener, Ontario. 

The P. D. Ross Scholarship, No. 2 

G. M. Wright, Kingston, Ontario. 

The University Scholarships in second year Science 
Courses A B C D M, value $100 each : 

R. W. Kraft, Kitchener, Ontario. 

D. C. Brunton, Ottawa, Ontario. 

G. M. Wright, Kingston, Ontario. 

D. Caplan, Ottawa, Ontario. 

Courses E F G, value $90 each : 

N. Z. Alcock, Vancouver, British Columbia. 


J. A. Jarvis, Ottawa, Ontario. 

The J. M. Mowat Scholarship $40 

J. A. Jarvis, Ottawa, Ontario. 

Science T1 Scholarship $20 

R. S, Lockeberg, Ottawa, Ontario. 

W. H. Nichols Scholarship, No. 2 $32 


R. D. McQuire, Port Colborne, Ontario. 

Third Year Scholarships 


Kenneth B. Carruthers Scholarships — 

Mining Engineering $110 

J. A. McLaren, Niagara Falls, Ontario. 

Metallurgical Engineering $110 

J. G. Eby, Hamilton, Ontario. 

Manley B. Baker Scholarship $125 

J. O’Neill, Waterloo, Ontario. 


$100 

$100 

,.$50 


121 


W. W. Near Scholarships — 

Chemistry $100 

G, E. Monteith, Aylmer (West), Ontario. 

Chemical Engineering $100 

A. J. Gunn, Brantfotrci, Ontario. 

Civil Engineering $100 

J. W. Brooks, London, Ontario. 

The Joseph Abramsky Scholarship $50 

G. V. Knowles, Ottawa, Ontario. 

The Isaac Cohen Scholarship $100 

E. W. Nier garth, Waterloo, Ontario. 

The Reuben Wells Leonard Scholarship for highest standing in the 

penultimate year $200 

J. H. Waghorne, Sarnia, Ontario. 

Khaki University and Y.M.C.A. Memorial Scholarship $60 

A. J. Gunn, Brantford, Ontario. 

Susan Near Scholarships — 

Mining Engineering $100 

J. A. McLaren, Niagara Falls, Ontario. 

L. S. Brooks, Paris, Ontario. 

Chemical Engineering $100 

A. J. Gunn, Brantford, Ontario'. 

Electrical Engineering .$100 

E. W. Niergarth, Waterloo, Ontario. 

Physics $100 

J. H. Waghorne, Sarnia, Ontario. 

Prizes 

Engineering Institute of Canada Prize $25 

N. S. Edgar, Regina, Saskatchewan. 

Fifth Field Company Prize $40 

E. W. Niergarth, Waterloo, Ontario. 

L. M. Arkley Prize $40 

D. W. McKay, Portage La Prairie, Manitoba. 

A. E. Segsworth Prize $40 

A. N. Miller, Montreal, Quebec. 


122 


DEGREES 

AWARDED IN THE FACULTY OF 
APPLIED SCIENCE, 1938 


Master of Science 

Name 

Address 

♦Dewar, D. J 


Gilbert, J. F 


Hay, R. H 


Lazier, T. A 



Bachelor of Science (Honours) 

Bimm, E. E 

Blay, R. A 

Bulbuk, S 


Kerr, T. M 


McGinnis, A. D 

McKibbin, K. H. . . . 

Kingston, Ontario. 

Pallister, E. G 


Reid, J. L 

Reid, T. L 


Scobie, K. W 

Sunnucks, D. C. ... 


Wiggins, E. J 



Bachelor of Science (Pass) 

Abbott, A. J 

Allan, R. G 

Alton, W 


Baker, R. D 

Bayles, A. K 

Beckham, J. W 

Berry, R. A 

Booth, C. R 

Boyd, W. E 

Bright, J. E 

Broadhurst, P. S. . . 

♦Brown, C. E 

Brown, D. W 

Ottawa, Ontario. 


♦Indicates graduates of October, 1938. 


Name 

123 

Address 

Bruce, C. G 

Bulmer, J. S 

Burton, R. H 


*Cadario', H. P 

Galium, J. P 

Campbell, A. M 

Campbell, K. W 

Carmichael, J. W 

Cole, C. 0 

Craig, C. E 

Cunnington, D. W 

Cuthbertson, C. C 

Calgary, Alberta. 

Davis, H. A 

Dixon, W. G 


Edwards, A. K 


*Ferguson, J. A 

Ferguson, R. N 

*File, H. A 

Freeman, R. E 

Chatham, Ontario. 

Mapanee, Ontario. 

Godfrey, G. M 

Graham, E, P 

Saskatoon, Sask. 

Halme, T. J 

Hames, C. A 

Hill, J. A 

*PIiIton, J. S 

Holmes, R. R 


Janes, T. H 

*Johnston, J. L 


Keeley, W. D 

*Kennedy, J. W 

LeCaine, H 

Lord, R. D 

Schumacher, Ontario. 

Martin, J. C R 

Miller, A. N 

Mitchell, J. G. S 

Morazain, J. F 

Morgan, R. G. P 

Mumford, R. D 

Winnipeg, Manitoba. 

McDonald, D. C 

McEwen, M, A 



Indicates graduates of October, 1938. 


124 


Name 


Address 


McKay, D. W. .. 
MacLeod, D. A. . 
MacMillan, D. C. 
McRoberts, R. D. 


London, Ontario. 
Jarvis, Ontario. 
Ottawa, Ontario. 
North Bay, Ontario. 


Neal, E. L 

Nobbs, F. W 


Papove, W. W 

=^Park, J. H 

Patzalek, E. A 

Piuze, L. C 

Poliskin, J 

Pugsley, R. L 


Ramsay, R. D 

♦Reid, J. W 

Reynolds, G. G 

Rice, F. G. H 

♦Richardson, W. G 

Ritzel, V. H 

♦Riverin, P. E 


♦Smallian, R. J 

♦Stark, R. G. 

Stubbs, K. H 

Stubbs, T. L 

Sarnia, Ontario. 

Traver, L. A 

Tremblav, E 



Vessie, I. D Ottawa, Ontario. 

"^Viberg, H. M Montreal, P.Q. 

Vollmer, G. L. T St. Catharines, Ontario. 

Walker, R. F Norwich, Ontario. 

Warren, G. T Shawbridge, P.Q. 

Webb, G. F Guelph, Ontario. 

Williams, J. T Clandeboye, Ontario. 

Williams, N. A Oshawa, Ontario. 

Wilson, H. C Port Arthur, Ontario. 

Wilson, J. P McGregor, Ontario. 

Woodrow, W. R Hamilton, Ontario. 

Wright, E. B Westport, Ontario. 


*Young, C. T. 


Windsor, Ontario. 


Indicates graduates of October, 1938. 


TIME TABLE 

: ' L. 


FIRST YEAR— ALL COURSES 


126 



I. 

5-8 





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Phys. 

Sects. 

Phys. II. 

Sect. 




Phys. 

Sects. 



Phys. II. 

Sect. 


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Math. III. 

Sects. 3-4 

Math. IV. 

Sects. 5-8 

Phys. II. Lab. 

Sbct. 2 

Chem. I. 

Sects. 5-8 

Math. III. 

Sects. 5-8 

Chem. I. 

1 Sects. 1-4 

1. i 

Phys. I. 

Sects. 1-4 ! 

Phys. II. Lab. 

Sect. 8 

Projection 

1 Sects. 5-6 j 


Math. IV. 

Sects. 5-8 

Projection 

Sects. 3-4 j 




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3-4 

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5-8 

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Chem. 

Sects. 

Phys. II. 

Sect. 

Surv. 

Sbcts. 

Math. 

Sects. 

Chem. 

Sects. 

Chem. 

Sects. 

Chem. 

Sects. 

Math. 

Sects. 

Phys. II. 

Sect. 

Projeci 

Sects. 

Surv. 

Sects. 

Phys. 

Sects. 

Projeci 

Sects. 




English I. 

Sects. 5-8 

Phys. II. Lab. 

Sect. 1 

Surv, I. 
Sects. 3 4 

Math. II. 

S'ects. 1-4 

Chem. I. 

Sects. 5-8 

English I. 
Sects. 5-8 

Chem. I. 
Sects. 1-4 I 

Math. II. 

Sects. 1-4 

Phys. II. Lab. 

Sect. 7 

Projection 
Sects. 5-6 

Math. III. 

Sects. 5-8 

Surv. I. 

Sects. 1-2 

Pro'ection 

Sects. 3-4 

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Phys. 

Sects. 

Phys. II. 

Sect. 



Draw. 

Sects. 

Phys. 

Sects. 

Draw. 

Sects. 


Phys. II. 

Sect. 

Projeci 

Sects. 

Phys. 

Sects. 


Chem. 

Sects. 




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English I. 
Sects. 1-4 

Phys. II. Lab. 

Sect. 5 



1 

English I. 
Sects. 1-4 

Phys. I. 
Sects. 5-8 

Phys. II. Lab. 
Sect. 3 


Math. III. 

Sects. 1-2 


Projection 
Sects. 7-8 




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127 


IV. 

Phys. XIV. (a) 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 
Miner. I. 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 
Phys. IV. (b) 
E.F.G., 1, 2 
Drawing III. (a) 
E.F.G. 

Phys. XIV. 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 


Phys. IV. (a) 

E.F.G., 1,2, 3 

Phys. III. (b) 

E.F.G., 1,2,3 

Mech. IX. 

E.F.G., 4, 5, 6 

Engineering 

Society 

1 

1 

1 

III. 

Phys. XIV. (a) 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 
Miner. I. 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 
Phys. IV. (b) 
E.F.G., 1, 2 
Drawing III. (a) 
E.F.G. 

Phys. XIV. 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 

Shop Work 
E.F.G. 3, 4 
Surv. II. 
E.F.G., 5, 6 

Drawing II. 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 

Shop Work 

E.F.G., 1, 2 

Qual. Anal. I. 

A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 

Phys. IV. (a) 

E.F.G., 1, 2, 3 

Phys. III. (b) 

E.F.G., 1, 2, 3 

Mech. IX. 

E.F.G., 4, 5, 6 

Drawing II. 

A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 

Qual. Anal. I. 

A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 

! 1 

i ^ 

I 

n. 1 

Miner. I. 
A.B.C.D.M., 1:, 2 
Miner. I. (b) 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 
Phys. XIV. (a) 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 
Descrip. Geom. 
E.F.G. 

Descrip. Geom. 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 
Phys. XIV. 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 
Shop Work 
E.F.G., 3, 4 
Surv. II. 
E.F.G., 5, 6 

Drawing II. 
A.B.C.D.M., .1. 4 
Shop Work 
E.F.G., 1, 2 
Phys. III. (a) 
E.F.G., 4, 5, 6 

Qual. Anal. I. 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 
Descrip. Geom. 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 

Mech. IX. 

E.F.G., 1, 2. 3 

Phys. IV. (a) 

E.F.G., 4, 5, 6 

Phys. III. (b) 

E.F.G., 4, 5, 6 

Drawing II. 

A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 

Qual. Anal I. 

A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 

Phys. III. (a) 

E.F.G., 1, 2, 3 

Phys. IV. (b) 

E.F.G., 5, 6 


hI 

Miner. I. 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 
Phys. XIV. (a) 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 
Descrip. Geom. 
E.F.G. 

Descrip. Geom. 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 
Phys. XIV. 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 
Shop Work 
E.F.G., 3, 4 
Surv. II. 
E.F.G., 5, 6 

Math. V. 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 
Drawing II. 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 
Shop Work 
E.F.G., 1, 2 
Phys. III. (a) 
E.F.G., 4, 5, 6 

Qual. Anal. I. 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 
Descrip. Geom. 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 
Mech. IX. 
E.F.G., 1, 2, 3 
Phys. IV. (a) 
E.F.G., 4, 5, 6 
Phys. III. (b) 
E.F.G., 4, 5, 6 

Drawing II. 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 

Qual. Anal. I. 

A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 

Phys. III. (a) 

E.F.G., 1, 2, 3 

Phys. IV. (b) 

E.F.G., 5, 6 


1 XI. 1 

Genl. I. 

A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 
Math. V. 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 
Math. V. 
E.F.G. 

Qual. Anal. I. 
A.B.C.D.M. 

Surv. II. 
E.F.G., 1, 2, 3, 4 
Shop Work 
E.F.G., 5, 6 

Surv. II. 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 
Math. V. 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 

Math. V. 
E.F.G. 

Qual. Anal. I. 
A.B.C.D.M. 

Drawing III. 
E.F.G. 

Genl. I. 

A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 
Math. V. 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 

Math. V. 
E.F.G. 

Qual. Anal. I. 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 
Surv. II. 

A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 

Ast. II. 

E.F.G. 


Math. V. 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 
Phys. XIV. (a) 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 
Genl. I. 
E.F.G. 

Phys. XIV. 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 
Surv. II. 
E.F.G., 1, 2, 3,4 
Shop Work 
E.F.G., 5, 6 

Surv. II. 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 
Qual. Anal. I. 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 

Mech. IX. 
E.F.G. 

Phys. XIV 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 
Surv. II. 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 

Drawing III. 
E.F.G. 

Math. V. 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 
Miner. I. 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 

Genl. I, 
E.F.G. 

Qual. Anal. I. 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 
Surv. II. 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 
Chem. II. 
E.F.G. 

1 IX. 

Miner. I. 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 
Genl. I. 

A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 
Phys. III. 
E.F.G. 

Geol. I. 
A.B.C.D.M. 

Surv. II. 
E.F.G., 1, 2, 3, 4 
Shop Work 
E.F.G., 5, 6 

Surv. II. 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 
Qual. Anal. I. 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 

Phys. IV. 
E.F.G. 

Geol. I. 
A.B.C.D.M. 

Drawing III. 
E.F.G. 

Miner. I. (b) 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 
Genl. I. 

A.B.C.D.M., 3. 4 

Phys. III. 
E.F.G. 

Qual. Anal. I. 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 
Surv. II. 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 
Phys. IV. (b) 
E.F.G., 3, 4 

> 


Phys. XIV. 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 

Surv. II. 
E.F.G. 

Surv. II. 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 
Qual. Anal. I. 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 

Phys. XIV. 
A.B.C.D.M., 3, 4 

Chem. II. 
E.F.G. 

Phys. IV. 
E.F.G. 

Phys. XIV. (a) 
A.B.C.D.M., 1, 2 

Phys. IV. (b) 
E.F.G., 3, 4 


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1 IV. 

Genl. V. 

M. 

A., Sects. 1,2, 3, 4 

Quant. Chem. II. 
B. 

Quant. Chem. I. 
C.D. 

A., Sects. 5 & 6 

Geol. III. (b) 

A., Sects. 1 & 2 

German A. 

B.H. 

Engineering 

Society 


1 III. 

Genl. V. 

M. 

A., Sects. 1,2, 3, 4 
Quant. Chem. II. 

B. 

Quant. Chem. I. 
C.D. 

A., Sects. 5 & 6 
Geol. VII. (b) 

C. 

Geol. III. (b) 
A., Sects. 1 & 2 
Genl. V. 

A, Sects 5 & 6 
D.F. 

Quant. Chem. I. 

M. 

Phys. Chem. I. 

B. 


- 

Genl. V. 

M 

A., Sects. 1, 2, 3,4 
Quant. Chem. II. 

B. 

Quant. Chem. I. 
C.D. 

A., Sects. 5 & 6 

Geol. VII. (b) 

C. 

Geol. III. (b) 
A., Sects. 3 & 4 
Genl. V. 

A, Sects 5 & 6 
D.F. 

Quant. Chem. I. 
M. 

Phys. Chem. I, 

B. 

Min. III. (a) 

C. 


- 

Quant. Chem. I. 
A.C. 

Geol. III. (b) 

A., Sects. 3 & 4 
Genl. V. 

A, Sects 5 & 6 
D.F. 

Quant. Chem. I. 

M. 

Phys. Chem. I. 

B. 

Min. III. (a) 

C. 


M 

X 

Ore Dressing 
A.C.M. 

Genl. Chem. III. 
B. 

Ind. Chem. II. 

D. (a) 

Chem. Eng. I. (b) 
D. 

Geol. IV. (a) 

A. 

Geol. III. (b) 

A. C. 

Org. Chem. I. 

B. D. 

Fire Assay 

A, Sects. 1 &2 (a) 
Sects. 5 & 6 (b) 
M, Sect. 1 (a) 

Org. Chem. I. 

B.D. (b) 

Ind. Chem. II. 
D. (a) 

Min. II. (b) 

C. 

Phys. Chem. I. 

M (b), Sect. 2 

>< 

Geol. III. (b) 
A.C. 

Ind. Chem. II. 

B.D. (a) 

Biol. XV. (a) 

C. 

Mech. XII. (b) 
D.M. 

Thermo. I. 

A. 

Min. III. (a) 
B.C. 

Elect. I. 
D.M.E. 

Fire Assay 

A, Sects. 1 &2(a) 
Sects. 5 & 6 (b) 
M, Sect. 1 (a) 

Quant. Chem. I. 
A., Sects. 3 & 4 
Org. Chem. I. 

B.D. (b) 

Ind. Chem. II. 

D (a) 

Min. II. (b) 

C. 

Phys. Chem. I. 

M (b), Sect. 2 

d 

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Phys. Chem. I. 
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Min. III. (a) 

B. 

Geol. II. 

C. 

Chem. Eng. I. 

D. (b) 

Org. Chem. V. 
M. 

Fire Assay 
A,Sects. 1 &2 (a) 
Sects. 5 & 6 (b) 
M, Sect. 1 (a) 

Quant. Chem. I. 
A., Sects. 3 & 4 
Org. Chem. I. 

B.D. (b) 

Ind. Chem. II. 

D. (a) 

Phys. Chem. I. 

M (b), Sect. 2 

1 'IIIA 

Min. IV. 

A.C. 

Min. VII. 

M. (a) 

Elect. I. 

A. 1 

Min. III. (a) 

B. 

Thermo. I. 
D.M.E.F.G. 

Fire Assay 

A, Sects. 1 & 2 (a) 
Sects. 5 & 6 (b) 
M, Sect. 1 (a) 

Quant. Chem. I. 
A., Sects. 3 & 4 

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3 

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THIRD YEAR E. 


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THIRD YEAR E. 


131 


> 

M 

Phys. V. (b) 

G.H. 

Phys. VII. 

H. (b) 

German A. 

B.H. 

Engineering 

Society 


1 -III 

Struct. I. 

E. 

Mech. III. 

F. 

Mech. VII. 

G. 

Phys. VII. 

H. 

Genl. VI. 

E. 

Genl. V. 

F. 


M 

Struct. I. 

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Mech. III. 

F. 

Mech. VII. 

G. 

Phys. VII. 

H. (a) 

Genl. VI. 

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Genl. V. 

F. 


M 

Struct. I. 

E. 

Mech. III. 

F. 

Mech. VII. 

G. 

Genl. VI. 

E. 

Genl. V. 

F. 



Geol. IX. 

E. 

Elect. II. 

G.H. 

Ry. I. 

E. 

Elect IV. 

F. (a) 

Mech. II. (b) 
F.G. 

Shop Work 

F. fb) 

Elect III. 

G. 

x' 

Genl. II. 

E. 

Elect III. 

G. 

Phys. VI. (b) 

H. 

Elect I. 
D.M.E. 

Math. VI. (a) 

■p JJ 

Math'. VII. 

G. 

Phys. VII. 

H. (a) 

Shop Work 

F. 

Elect III. 

G. 

Phys. VI. (b) 

H. 

X 

M 

Struct. I. 

E. 

Phys. V. (a) 

Elect Vi. (b) 
G.H. 

Mech. II. (b) 
F.G. 

Shop Work 

F. 

Elect III. 

G. 

1 TIIA 1 

Elect IV. 

F. (b) 

Math, XI. 

H. (b) 

Thermo. I. 
D.M.E.F.G. 

Shop Work 

F. (a) 

Math. XI. 

H. (b) 

Thurs. 

Fri. 

Xfl 


(a) — First term. (b) — Second term. 


FOURTH YEAR 


132 


IV. 

German A. 

C. 

Chem. Eng. III. 

D. (b) 

Fire Assay (b) 

C. 

Metallography 

M. (a) 

Elect VIII. 

G.H. (b) 

III. 

Ind. Chem. III. 

B. (a) 

Chem. Opt. 

B. rb) 

Chem. Eng. III. 

D. 

Met. VII. 

M. 

Struct. II. 

E. 

Mech. V. 

F. 

Elect X. 

G. 

Phys. XIII. 

H. 

Chem. Opt. 

B. (b) 

Fire Assay (b) 

C. 

Chem. Eng. III. 

D. (a) 

Metallography 

M. 

Min. VI. (b) 

M. 

Genl. IV. (a) 

E. 

Mech. V. (a) 

F. 

Hydr. III. (b) 

F. 

Elect VIII. 

G.H. 

II. 

Mining II. 

A. 

Ind, Chem. III. 

B. (a) 

Chem. Opt. 

B. (b) 

Chem. Eng. III. 
D. 

Met. VII. 

M. 

Struct. II. 

1 E. 

1 Mech. V. 

F. 

Elect X. 

G. 

Phys. XIII. 

H. 

Mining II. (b) 
A. 

Coll. Chem. I. (a) 

D. 

Coll. Chem. II. 

B. (a) 

Chem. Opt. 

B. (b) 

Fire Assay (b) 

C. 

Metallography 

M. 

•Min. VI. (b) 

M. 

Genl. IV. (a) 

E. 

Mech. V. (a) 

F. 

Hydr. III. (b) 

F. 

Elect VIII. 

G.H. 

I. 

Ind. Chem. III. 
B. (a) 

Chem. Opt. 

B. (b) 
Mining IV. 
C.M. 

Chem. Eng. III. 

D. 

Struct. II. 

E. 

Mech. V. 

F. 

Elect X. 

G. 

Phys. XIII. 

H. 

Mining II. (a) 

A. 

Coll. Chem. I. (a) 

G- 

Coll. Chem. 11. 

B. (a) 

Chem. Opt. 

B. fb) 

Fire Assay (b) 

C. 

Metallography 

M. (b) 

Min. VI. (b) 

M. 

Genl. IV. (a) 

E. 

Mech. V. (a) 

F. 

Mech. IV. (b) 

A.D.E.G. 

Hydr. III. (b) 

F. 

Elect VIII. 

G.H. (a) 

XI 

1 Hydraulics II. 

F. 

1 Elect. V. 

1 

Phys. IX. 

H. 

i 

Geol. VIII 
A.C. 

Org. Chem. II. 
B. 

Chem. Eng. IV. (b) 

! D. 

1 Met V. (a) 

1 M. 

Mun. III. 

E. 

Elect X. 

G. (a) 

Phys. X. 

H. 

X. 

Geol. V. 

A.C. 

Phys. Chem. II. 
B.D.M. 

Eng. Econ. 

E. 

Elect VII. 

F. 

Elect VIII. 
G.H. 

Mech. IV. (a) 
A.D.E.G. 

Hydr. IV. (b) 

A. 

Phys. Chem. III. 

B. 

Struct II. (b) 

E. 

Mech. V. 

F. 

Elect. X. 

G. (b) 

IX. 

Econ. I. 
A.B.C.D.M. 
E.F.G.H. 

Met IV. 

A. M. 

Sci. Germ. 

B. H. 

Geol. VI. 

C. 

Thermo. III. 
D.F. 

Struct. IV. 

E. 

Elect. V. 

G. 

VIII. 

Mining II. 

A. 

Thermo. III. 
D.F. 

Metallography 

M. 

Math. X. (b) 

H. 

Mining II. 

A. 

Phys. Chem. II. 
B.D.M. 

Hydraulics II. 
E.G. 

• 1 

Mon. 

Tues. 


(a) — First term. (b) — Second term. 


FOURTH YEAR 


133 


> 

German A. 

C. 

Phys. Chem. 1 1. 

B. D. 

Min. VI. (b) 

C. 

Met. Lab. 

M. (b) 

Phys. X. 

H. (b) 


Mining HI. 

A. 

Org. Chem. II. 

B. 

Thesis 

C. 

Thermo. III. (a) 

D. 

Chem. Eng. II. 
D. (b) 

Phys. Chem. II. 
M. 

Struct. IV. 

E. 

Elect. VII. 

F. 

Hydr. III. (a) 

G. 

Phys. Chem. II. 

B. D. 

Min. VI. (b) 

C. 

Met. Lab. 

M. 

Highway 

E. (a) 

Mun. H. 

E. 

Mun. HI. 

E. (b) 

Thermo. HI. (a) 

F. 

Mech. VHI. (b) 

F. 

Elect V. 

G. 

Phys. X. 

H. (b) 

M 

Mining HI. 

A. 

Org. Chem. 1 1. 

B. 

Thesis 

C. 

Thermo. IH. (a) 

D. 

Chem. Eng. 1 1. 
D. (b) 

Phys. Chem. H. 
M. 

Struct. IV. 

E. 

Elect. VII. 

F. 

Hydr. HI. (a) 

G. 

Phys. Chem. II. 

B. D. 

Min. VI. (b) 

C. 

Met Lab. 

M. 

Highway 

E. (a) 

Mun. H. 

E. 

Mun. IH. 

E. (b) 

Thermo. IH. (a) 

F. 

Mech. VIII. (b) 

F. 

Elect. V. 

G. 

Phys. X. 

H. (b) 

M 

Mining III. 

A. 

Org. Chem. H. 

B. 

Tliesis 

C. 

Thermo. HI. (a) 

D. 

Chem. Eng. H. 
D. (b) 

Phys. Chem. H. 
M. 

Struct. IV. 

E. 

Elect. VH. 

F. 

Hydr. HI. (a) 

G . 

Geol. VHI. 
A.C. 

Hydr. IV. (b) 

D. M. 

Met. Lab. 

M. (a) 
Highway 

E. (a) 

Mun. II. 

E. 

Mun. HI. 

E. (b) 

Thermo. III. (a) 

F. 

Mech. VIII. (b) 

F. 

Elect. V. 

G. 

M 

X 

X 

Met. IV. 

A.M. 

Ind. Chem. HI. 
B. (a) 

Coll. Chem. II. 

B. (b) 

Min. V. 

r. 

Chem. Eng. 1 1, 

D. 

Highway 

E. 

Mech. V. 

F. 

Phys. IX. 

H. 

Met IV. 

A.M. 1 

Org. Chem. II. 
B. 

Chem. Eng. IV. 

D- 

Mun. H. 

E. 

Mech. V. 

F. 

Elect V. 

G. 

Phys. X. 

H. 

Mining H. 

A. 

Coll. Chem. II. 

B. (a) 

Coll. Chem. I. (a) 

D. 

Geol. XII. (a) 

C. 

Hydro. IV. (b) 
D.M. 

Ind. Chem. I. 

E. 

Mech. VI. (a) 

F. 

Mech. XI. (b) 

F. 

Elect. XII. 
G.H. 

Hydr. IV. 

A.D. (a), M (a) 

Chem. Eng. III. 
D. (b) 

Phys. Chem. III. 
B. 

Struct. II. 

E. 

Mech. VI. 

F. 

Elect XII. 
G.H. 

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Geol. VI. 

C. 

Met V. (b) 

M. 

Sci. Germ. 

B.H. 

Hydr. II. 

F. 

VIII 

Chem. Eng. IV. (a) 

D. 

Met. VI. (b) 
M.G. 

Mech. XI. (a) 

F. 

Math. X. (b) 

H. 

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FOURTH YEAR 


134 


A.I 1 III 1 

German A. 

C. 

Engineering 

Society 


Milling 

A.M. 

Phys. Chem. III. 

B. 

Thesis 

C. 

Shop Work (b) 

D. 

Struct. II. 

E. 

Thermo. IV. 

F. 

Elect. V. 

G. 

Phys. XIII. 

H. 

i 


1 11 

Milling 

A.M. 

Min. VI. (b) 

A. (Geol. opt.) 

Phys. Chem. III. 

B. 

Thesis 

C. 

Shop Work (b) 

D. 

Struct. II. 

E. 

Thermo. IV. 

F. 

Elect. V. 

G. 

Phys. XIII. 

H. 



Milling 

A.M. 

Min. VI. (b) 

A. (Geol. opt.) 

Phys. Chem. III. 

B. 

Thesis 

C. 

Shop Work (b) 

D. 

Struct. II. 

E. 

Thermo. IV. 

F. 

Elect. V. 

G. 

Phys. XIII. 

H. 


1 ! 

Milling 

A.M. 

Ind. Chem. III. 

B. U) 

Coll. Chem. II. 
B. (b) 

Min. V. 

C. 

Chem. Eng. II. 

D. 

Struct. IV. 

E. 

Thermo. IV. 

F. 

Phys. IX. 

H. 

Milling 

A.M. 

Org. Chem. II. 

B. 

Min. V. 

c. 

Chem. Eng. II. 

D. (a) 

Chem. Eng. III. 
D (b) 

Hydr. III. 

E. (b) 

Mech. Eng. VIII, 

F. (b) 

Phys. X. (a) 

H. 

Elect. XII. 
G.H. 

1 X- 1 

Milling 

A.M. 

Coll. Chem. II. 

B. (a) 

Geol. XII. (a) 

C. 

Chem, Opt. 

B (b) 

Chem. Eng. III. 

D. 

Struct. IV. 

E. 

Thermo. IV. 

F. 

Elect. V. 

G. 

Milling 

A.M. 

Org. Chem. II. 

B. 

Min. V. 

c. 

Chem. Eng. II. 

D. (a) 

Hydr. III. 

E. (b) 

Mech. Eng. VIII. 

F. (b) 

Elect. XII. 

G.H. 

1 XI 

Milling 

A.M. i 

Chem. Opt. 

B. (b) 

Chem. Eng. III. 
D. 

Hydr. II. 

E.G. 

Met. VIII. (a) 

F. 

Milling 

A.M. 

Org. Chem. II. 
B. 

Chem. Eng. II. 

D. (a) 

Hydr. III. 

E. (b) 

Mech. Eng. VIII. 

F. (b) 

Elect. XII. 

G.H. 

1 IIIA 1 

Hydr. IV. (a) 

A. D.M. 

Chem. Opt. 

B. (b) 

Met. VIII. (a) 

F. 

Math. X. (b) 

H. 



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V 




PLAM OF QUEEN’S 


UNIVERSITY GROUNDS 


1. Central Heating Plant. 

2. Commerce Building 

3. Observatory 

4. Ban Righ Hall 

5. Old Arts Building 

6. Principal’s Residence 

7. Old Medical Building 

8. Hydraulics Laboratory 

9. Medical Laboratory 
10. Jock Harty Arena 


11. Carruthers Hall 

12. Fleming Hall 

13. Technical Supplies and Storehouse 

14. Mechanical Laboratory 

15. Nicol Hall 

16. Gordon Hall 

17. Douglas Library 

18. Ontario Hall 

19. Grant Hall 

20. Kingston Hall 


21. Richardson Stadium 

22. Leonard Field 

23. Kingston General Hospital 
and Richardson Laboratory 

24. Miller Hall 

25. Gymnasium 

26. Students’ Memorial Union 

27. Gordon House 

28. Goodwin House 

29. Macdonnell House